Feast of St. Cornelius, Centurion and Bishop (February 4)   Leave a comment

Above: Peter Baptizing Cornelius the Centurion, by Franceso Trevasani, 1709

Image in the Public Domain

The Faith of a Gentile

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The Listed Lections for This Feast Day:

Acts 11:1-18

Psalm 67 or Psalm 33:1-5, 20-21

Luke 13:22-29

The Collect:

O God, by your Spirit you called Cornelius the Centurion to be the first Christian among the Gentiles; Grant to your Church such a ready will to go where you send and to do what you command, that under your guidance it may welcome all who turn to you in love and faith, and proclaim the Gospel to all nations; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

St. Cornelius was a centurion, or Roman officer who commanded 100 men.  Centurions were respected military men and Roman citizens renowned for courage and competence.  St. Cornelius was one of the Gentile God-fearers, who worshiped the one God of Judaism.  He  received a divine revelation, and summoned St Peter, whom he helped to recognize the equality of Jewish and Gentile believers, and accepted baptism.

The baptism of St. Cornelius and his household at Caesarea was a pivotal event in the movement to welcome Gentiles as equals within nascent Christianity.

The household of St. Cornelius became the nucleus of the first Christian Church at Caesarea, the city where he became the second Bishop.    Acts 8:40 and 21:8 contain references to this congregation.

Here is my rhetorical question:  Who are our “Gentiles” today?

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 12, 2010

THE FEAST OF ENMEGAHBOWH, EPISCOPAL PRIEST

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Revised on November 27, 2016

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Advertisements

Posted June 12, 2010 by neatnik2009 in February, Saints of 29-199 C.E.

Tagged with

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: