Archive for January 2014

Feast of George Duffield, Jr., and Samuel Duffield (July 6)   1 comment

Samuel Duffield

Above:  Samuel Duffield

Image Source = http://www.hymntime.com/tch/bio/d/u/f/duffield_saw.htm

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GEORGE DUFFIELD, JR. (SEPTEMBER 11, 1818-JULY 6, 1888)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

father of

SAMUEL AUGUSTUS WILLOUGHBY DUFFIELD (SEPTEMBER 24, 1843-MAY 12, 1887)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

Sometimes, as I research a proposed saint whose name I found somewhere, the trail leads me to at least one other remarkable person.  That happened as I read about George Duffield, Jr. (1818-1888); I learned about his son, Samuel, also.

The Duffield family produced a lineage of distinguished Presbyterian clergymen.  One George Duffield (1732-1790) served in the Continental Army as a chaplain during the U.S. War for Independence.  His grandson, George Duffield, Sr. (1796-1868), was the 1862 Moderator of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (New School) (1838-1869).  From that stock came George Duffield, Jr.

George Jr., born at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, graduated from Yale University and Union Theological Seminary.  His ministerial career, spent building up small congregations while relying on his wealth to sustain himself financially, was as follows:

  1. Fifth Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, New York (1840-1847);
  2. First Presbyterian Church, Bloomfield, New Jersey (1847-1852);
  3. Central Presbyterian Church of the Northern Liberties, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1852-1861);
  4. Adrian, Michigan (1861-1865);
  5. Second Presbyterian Church, Galesburg, Illinois (1865-1869);
  6. Saginaw, Michigan (1869); and
  7. Ann Arbor and Lansing, Michigan (1869-1884).

George Jr. retired in 1884 and spent his final years with his son, Samuel, whom he survived by slightly less than one year.

Samuel Augustus Willoughby Duffield (1843-1887), born in Brooklyn, New York, graduated from Yale University in 1863.  He, licensed to preach in 1866 and ordained the following year, served in the following places:

  1. Bergers, New Jersey;
  2. Ann Arbor, Michigan;
  3. Altoona, Pennsylvania; and
  4. Westminster Presbyterian Church, Bloomfield, New Jersey (1881-1887).

He, a translator and author of hymns, was also a scholar of hymnody.  His publications included:

  1. A translation of Bernard’s Hora Novissima (1867);
  2. Warp and Woof:  A Book of Verse (1868);
  3. The Burial of the Dead (1882);
  4. English Hymns:  Their Authors and History (1886); and
  5. Latin Hymn Writers and Their Hymns (1889).

I excavated one of Samuel’s hymns, “Oh, Land Relieved from Sorrow,” from the Southern Presbyterian Hymns of the Ages (1891):

Oh, land relieved from sorrow!

Oh, land secure from tears!

Oh, respite on the morrow

From all the toil of years!

To thee we hasten ever,

To thee our steps ascend,

Where darkness cometh never,

And joy shall never end.

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Oh, happy, holy, portal

For God’s own blest elect:

Oh, region, pure, immortal,

With better spring bedecked:

Thy pearly doors for ever

Their welcome shall extend,

Where darkness cometh never,

And joy shall never end.

+++++

Oh, home where God the Father

Takes all His children in:

Where Christ the Son shall gather

The sinners saved from sin:

No might nor fear shall sever

A friend from any friend,

For darkness cometh never,

And joy shall never end.

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Rise, then, O brightest morning!

Come, then, triumphant day!

When into new adorning

We change and pass away:

For so with firm endeavor

Our spirits gladly tend

Where darkness cometh never,

And joy shall never end.

Samuel took after his father, George Jr., who also wrote hymn texts.  One of these was “Blessed Saviour, Thee I Love.”  Another was “Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus,” with an interesting origin story and two more stanzas than most hymnals publish these days.  George Jr. was active in the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) at Philadelphia.  One of his dearest friends there was Dudley A. Tyng, an Episcopal priest also active in the YMCA.  One day in 1858 Tyng suffered a sudden and fatal accident.  He did have enough time to send a message to his fellow clergymen.

Tell them to stand up for Jesus,

he said.  George Jr., moved by the loss of his friend, wrote the famous hymns.  “Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus,” customarily four stanzas long in hymnals, was originally six stanzas long:

Stand up, stand up for Jesus,

Ye soldiers of the cross;

Lift high His royal banner,

It must not suffer loss:

From victory to victory

His army shall He lead,

Till every foe is vanquished,

And Christ is Lord indeed.

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Stand up, stand up for Jesus!

The solemn watchword hear,

If while ye sleep He suffers,

Away with shame and fear;

Wherein ye meet with evil,

Within you or without,

Charge for the God of Battles,

And put the foe to rout!

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Stand up, stand up for Jesus!

The trumpet call obey;

Forth to the mighty conflict,

In this His glorious day:

Ye that are men now serve Him

Against unnumbered foes;

Let courage rise with danger,

And strength to strength oppose.

+++++

Stand up, stand up for Jesus!

Stand in His strength alone;

The arm of flesh will fail you,

Ye dare not trust your own:

Put on the gospel armor,

Each piece put on with prayer;

Where duty calls, or danger,

Be never wanting there.

+++++

Stand up, stand up for Jesus!

Each soldier to his post;

Close up the broken column,

And shout through all the host!

Make good the loss so heavy,

In those that still remain,

And prove to all around you

That death itself is gain!

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Stand up, stand up for Jesus!

The strife will not be long;

This day the noise of battle,

The next the victor’s song:

To Him that overcometh

A crown of life shall be;

He with the King of Glory

Shall reign eternally.

This hymn debuted in print in Lyra Sacra Americana (1868), on pages 99 and 100.

Families ought to propagate healthy faith.  The Duffields nurtured faith across generational lines and did much to feed it in many others down the corridors of time.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 21, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS MIROCLES OF MILAN AND EPIPHANIUS OF PAVIA, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS

THE FEAST OF SAINT AGNES, MARTYR AT ROME

THE FEAST OF SAINTS ALBAN ROE AND THOMAS REYNOLDS, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS AND MARTYRS

THE FEAST OF SAINT GASPAR DEL BUFALO, FOUNDER OF THE MISSIONARIES OF THE PRECIOUS BLOOD

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

George Duffield, Jr.; Samuel Duffield; and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Charles Albert Dickinson (July 4)   6 comments

Portland Head Light

Above:  Portland Head Light, Portland, Maine, Circa 1917

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-USZ62-101998

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CHARLES ALBERT DICKINSON (JULY 4, 1849-JANUARY 9, 1906)

U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

Charles Albert Dickinson, born at Westminster, Vermont, in 1849, did much to help vulnerable young people.  His legacy remains intact via institutions in 2014, fortunately.

Dickinson, an 1876 graduate of Harvard University and an 1879 graduate of Andover Theological Seminary, entered the ranks of Congregational Church clergymen.  His first pastorate was at Portland, Maine.  From 1882 to 1888 he ministered at Lowell, Massachusetts.  His final pastorate was Berkeley Street Church, Boston, Massachusetts, from which he retired due to ill health.  In 1899 our saint moved to Ceres, California.

Dickinson, interested in ministry to the young, became involved in the Christian Endeavor movement, which pioneered that work in many churches.  That project led to the writing of a hymn, “Blessed Master, I Have Promised” (1900), for the Endeavor Hymnal (1901).

Our saint’s interest in ministry to the young also led him to engage in humanitarian efforts, which continue to serve people in 2014.  In 1894 Dickinson helped to found the Boston Floating Hospital, for the fresh air, people said, would be good for the ailing young people.  That year he also founded the Kurn Hattin Homes in rural Westminster, Vermont, for he thought that underprivileged children would fare better in the countryside than on city streets.

Our saint died at Corona, California, in 1906.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 20, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SARAH, BIBLICAL MATRIARCH

THE FEAST OF SAINTS DEICOLA AND GALL, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONKS; AND SAINT OTHMAR, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT AT GALLEN

THE FEAST OF SAINTS EUTHYMIUS THE GREAT AND THEOCRISTUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOTS

THE FEAST OF SAINT FABIAN, BISHOP OF ROME

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served,

and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom

the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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A Related Story:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/lisa-bianconi-life-changer-music-teacher-grammy-nominee/

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Feast of Henry Montagu Butler (July 2)   1 comment

Trinity College, Cambridge

Above:  Trinity College, Cambridge, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-08091

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HENRY MONTAGU BUTLER (JULY 2, 1833-JANUARY 14, 1918)

Educator, Scholar, Hymn Writer, and Anglican Priest

Today I add Henry Montagu Butler (credited sometimes as Henry Montague Butler), a classicist and hymn writer, to the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days as I commence another found of saints for July.

I recall an incident from not less than thirteen years ago.  I accompanied my father, then pastor of the Warwick United Methodist Church, Warwick, Georgia, to lunch at the home of a couple of his parishioners.  (I was a member of Christ Episcopal Church, Cordele, Georgia, at the time.)  The husband half of the host couple made a disturbing comment.  He disparaged intellectuals as having faith inferior to that of people not as well educated.  Both my father and I were tactful.  I recall my response was silence; that was an inappropriate time to spark a confrontation.  That man was, however, not only guilty of anti-intellectualism but of objective error in his comment.

One of the reasons I converted to The Episcopal Church and have remained in it is the denominational culture’s embrace of the human intellect.  We do not check our brains at the church door, we say, and I certainly do not check mine at any door.  Other denominations and congregations there also accept the union of faith, reason, intellect, and science, of course, and I applaud them for that.  May such a healthy view of faith and modernist knowledge only spread.

Henry Mongagu Butler (1833-1918) personified the best of scholarship and the Christian faith.  He, a classicist, was a skilled writer of Latin and Greek verse.  He was also an educator and an Anglican priest.  Our saint’s father was Dr. George Butler, Headmaster of the Harrow School.  Henry, educated at the Harrow School and at Trinity College, Cambridge, became a Fellow at the latter.  Our saint took Holy Orders in The Church of England in 1859, the year he became Headmaster of the Harrow School.  He left that post in 1885 to become Dean of Gloucester.  The following year our saint became the Master of his other alma mater, Trinity College, Cambridge, a post he held for the rest of his life.  And, in 1889-1890, he served as Vice Chancellor at Cambridge.

Our saint’s published works included the following:

  1. Remember Your Leaders (1892), a sermon;
  2. An Inaugural Lecture Delivered for the Session, 1898-9, at the University College of Wales, Aberustwyth, October 16th, 1898;
  3. University and Other Sermons (1899);
  4. Ten Great and Good Men (1910);
  5. Lord Chatham as an Orator (1912); and
  6. Some Leisure Hours of  Long Life (1914).

Butler, also for a time the Curate of Great St. Mary’s, Cambridge, wrote at least one great hymn, “‘Lift Up Your Hearts!’ We Lift Them, Lord, to Thee” (1881) for that year’s Harrow School Hymn Book.

May we honor this saintly scholar and poet.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 19, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SARGENT SHRIVER, U.S. STATESMAN

THE FEAST OF SAINT CAESARIUS OF ARLES, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP; AND SAINT CAESARIA OF ARLES, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBESS

THE FEAST OF SAINT HENRY OF UPPSALA, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF SAINT WULFSTAN OF WORCESTER, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

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O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Henry Montagu Butler and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

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Feast of Johann Olaf Wallin (June 30)   1 comment

johan_olof_wallin_femtio_portrc3a4tt_af_ryktbara_svenskar

Above:  Archbishop Wallin

Image in the Public Domain

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JOHANN OLAF WALLIN (OCTOBER 15, 1779-JUNE 30, 1839)

Archbishop of Uppsala and Hymn Writer

Johann Olaf Wallin, or as I have also seen his name spelled, Johan Olof Wallin, is to Swedish Lutheran hymnody what people such as Charles Wesley, Isaac Watts, and Philip Doddridge are to traditional English hymnody.

Wallin, born at Stora Tuna, Delarna province, Sweden, was the son of a sergeant major in the Army.  Our saint became a scholar, earning his doctoral degree from the University of Uppsala at age twenty-four.  Wallin, ordained in 1806, became the theological assistant at Karlberg War College the following year.  In 1808 he became lecturer at the college and pastor at Solna.  Four years later our saint became pastor of the Adolf Frederik Church, Stockholm.  In 1818 he became Dean of Vasteras.  Three years later Wallin became pastor at Storkyrkan.  In 1824 he became a bishop (of which diocese I cannot determine).  After thirteen years our saint rose to Archbishop of Uppsala, the Primate of the Church of Sweden, having become chief royal preacher in 1830.  He died in 1839.

Wallin’s main contribution was literary, especially in the realm of hymnody.  He served on the committee which produced a proposed successor to the 1695 Psalmboken, or hymnal, in 1811.  That revision, criticized roundly, never became official.  Yet Wallin did forge the 1819 Psalm-Boken, which the Church of Sweden amended in 1920 and replaced in 1937.  The 1819 volume

represented both the high point in classic Swedish literary style and the blending of the new idealist romanticism with the older strict Lutheran theology.  In time it came to win such a secure place in the hearts of the Swedish people that no other book could completely replace it.

–Joel W. Lundeen in Marilyn Kay Stulken, Hymnal Companion to the Lutheran Book of Worship (Philadelphia, PA:  Fortress Press, 1981), pages 45-46

Yet the 1819 Psalm-Boken had its critics from the left and the right.  Pietists tended to find it too rigidly orthodox, so they prepared their own unofficial books.  And strict orthodox factions, objecting to the romanticism of the 1819 volume, prepared their unofficial hymnals.  One of these (from 1849) became the official (Swedish-language) hymnal of the old Augustana Synod in North America in 1892.

Wallin’s work dominated the 1819 Psalm-Boken, which contained 500 hymns.  He wrote 128 of them, translated twenty-three, and revised 178.  That influence remained strong in the book’s 1937 successor, with about one-third of whose content bore Wallin’s stamp.

I have added some of our saint’s hymns to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  Wallin’s output being so numerous, I have chosen to include just two hymn texts in this post.  The first is his great Christmas hymn, translated by Ernst William Olson in The Hymnal and Order of Service (1925), Augustana Synod:

All hail to thee, O blessed morn!

To tidings long by prophets borne

Hast thou fulfillment given.

O sacred and immortal day,

When unto death, in glorious ray,

Descends the grace of heaven!

Singing,

Ringing,

Sounds are blending,

Praises sending

Unto heaven

For the Saviour to us given.

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‘Tis God’s own Image and, withal

The Son of Man, that mortals all

May find in Him a brother.

He comes, with peace and love to bide

On earth, the erring race to guide

And help as could no other;

Rather

Gather

Closer, fonder,

Sheep that wander,

Feed and fold them,

Then let evil powers hold them.

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He tears, like other men, will shed,

Our sorrows share, and be our aid,

Through His eternal power;

The Lord’s good will unto us show,

And mingle in our cup of woe

The drops of mercy’s shower;

Dying,

Buying

Through His passion

Our salvation,

And to mortals

Opening the heavenly portals.

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He comes, for our redemption sent,

And by His glory heaven is rent

To close upon us never;

Our blessed Shepherd He would be,

Whom we may follow faithfully

And be with Him forever;

Higher,

Nigher,

Glory wringing,

Praises singing

To the Father

And His Son, our Lord and Brother.

And, to complete the process which the Incarnation began, there was Easter.  Thus I share the following text, translated by Brent Emil Bengston, and also from the 1925 Hymnal:

He lives! O fainting heart, anew

With joy thy Lord and Saviour view!

He from the silent chamber woke,

And speaks again as e’er He spoke.

A quickening hand He has to give:

He lives, and thou shalt also live.

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O hear His voice and take His hand,

Thou traveler to a better land;

While passing through thy crucial test,

Lift up thy head,–a peaceful rest;

Thy trials over, He shall give:

He lies, and thou shalt also live.

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Ye dead in sin, awake, arise!

The Lord is calling from the skies.

Repentant come, in faith remain,

And live in Him; from sin and pain

And death shall He salvation give:]

He lives, and thou shalt also live.

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With Him thy guide lies smooth and bright

The pathway to the realms of light;

Abiding faith, undying love,

And hope lead to the home above.

Thy life into His keeping give:

He lives, and thou shalt also live.

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Of glory shall His raiment be;

O’er time and o’er eternity

The Sun of righteousness shall shine;

In heaven’s throne He sits divine;

A footstool earth to Him shall give:

He lives, and thou shalt also live.

Thanks be to God for the life and work of Archbishop Wallin!

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 18, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE CONFESSION OF SAINT PETER, APOSTLE

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Johann Olaf Wallin and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Hugh Thomson Kerr, Sr., and Hugh Thomson Kerr, Jr. (June 27)   1 comment

132823pv

Above:  Interior View, Facing the Altar and Pulpit, Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, April 1963

Image Creator = Historic American Buildings Survey

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = HABS PA,2-PITBU,22–10

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HUGH THOMSON KERR, SR. (FEBRUARY 11, 1872-JUNE 27, 1950)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Liturgist

father of 

HUGH THOMSON KERR, JR. (JULY 1, 1909-MARCH 27, 1992)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Scholar, and Theologian

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With this post I add a father-son combination to the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.

Hugh Thomson Kerr, Sr., was born at Elora, Ontario, Canada, in 1872.  He attended Knox College of the University of Toronto and the Theological School of the Presbyterian Church of Canada before coming to the United States and studying at Western Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  The Presbytery of Pittsburgh ordained him in 1897.  Hugh Sr. served a church in Hutchinson, Kansas, then at Fullerton Avenue Presbyterian Church, Chicago, Illinois, before becoming pastor of Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1913.  He retired from that congregation thirty-three years later.  For the fiftieth anniversary of Shadyside Church Hugh Sr. wrote a hymn, “God of Our Life” (1916).

Hugh Sr. served on the denominational level with distinction.  He, the 1930-1931 Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., helped to shepherd the denomination through the Modernist-Fundamentalist controversy of the 1920s and 1930s, the one which ended with the Presbyterian Church of America (renamed “Orthodox Presbyterian Church” after a few years and its own schism in the late 1930s, after the death of its founder, J. Gresham Machen), breaking way in 1936.  (Some of the theologically self-identified “pure” are purer than others.)

Presbyterian Church of America Article

Above:  Part of an Article about the New Presbyterian Church of America (later the Orthodox Presbyterian Church), July 8, 1936

Photograph Dated December 31, 2013

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Hugh Sr. also helped to create The Book of Common Worship (Revised) (1932) and The Book of Common Worship (1946).  The latter volume, according to some Presbyterian critics, was too Episcopalian.

BCW 1946

Above:  My Grandmother’s Handwriting Inside the Front of a Copy of The Book of Common Worship (1946)

Photograph Dated December 31, 2013

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Hugh Sr. was an ecclesiastical pioneer.  In the 1920s and 1930s he preached via radio.  And he, an ecumenist, helped to bring about World Communion Sunday, celebrating the first one at Shadyside Church in 1933.

A partial list of Hugh Sr.’s publications’ follows:

  1. Port to Listening Post (1910);
  2. Children’s Story-Sermons (1911);
  3. Children’s Missionary Story Sermons (1915);
  4. The Highway of Life, and Other Sermons (1917);
  5. The Supreme Gospel:  A Study of the Epistle to the Hebrews (1918);
  6. My First Communion (1920); and
  7. Children’s Gospel Story-Sermons (1921).

Hugh Thomson Kerr, Jr., was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1909.  He graduated from Princeton University in 1931 then began his M.A. studies at the University of Pittsburgh.  He graduated in 1934 and became a Presbyterian minister.  Hugh Jr., after studying for his doctorate at the University of Edinburgh (1934-1936), joined the faculty of Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky.  He returned to Princeton in 1940, joining the faculty of the Theological Seminary.  In 1950 Hugh Jr. became the Benjamin B. Warfield Professor of Systematic Theology, holding that position until he retired twenty-four years later.

Hugh Jr., a scholar, maintained an association with Theology Today from 1944 to 1992, first as Associate Editor (through 1951) then as Editor (starting in 1951).  His published works included many articles and some books, such as:

  1. A Compend of The Institutes of the Christian Religion by John Calvin (1939), as editor;
  2. A Compend of Luther’s Theology (1943), as editor;
  3. Positive Protestantism:  An Interpretation of the Gospel (1950);
  4. By John Calvin:  A Reflection Book Introduction to the Writings of John Calvin (1960);
  5. Our Life in God’s Light (1979), collected essays; and
  6. A Year With the Bible, an annual devotional guide.

Hugh Jr., like his father, was an ecumenist.  The son, a supporter of the rights of women, participated in the World Council of Churches’ Commission on Women.  He was also active in the National Council of Churches’ Committee on Church Architecture as well as in the World Alliance of Reformed Churches.

Hugh Jr. died at Princeton, New Jersey in 1992.

Father and son left the church and the world better than they found them.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 17, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT ANTONY OF EGYPT, DESERT FATHER

THE FEAST OF SAINT BERARD AND HIS COMPANIONS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYRS IN MOROCCO

THE FEAST OF EDMUND HAMILTON SEARS, UNITARIAN PASTOR AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF RUTHERFORD BIRCHARD HAYES, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

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Almighty God, we praise you for your servants

Hugh Thomson Kerr, Sr.; and Hugh Thomson Kerr, Jr.;

through whom you have called the church to its tasks and renewed its life.

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your church and proclaim the reality of your reign,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

Feast of William Hiram Foulkes (June 16)   1 comment

PCUSA 1937

Above:  Part of The Christian Century‘s Report on the 1937 General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.

Photograph Dated December 31, 2013

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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WILLIAM HIRAM FOULKES (JUNE 16, 1877-DECEMBER 9, 1961)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

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Science and religion no more contradict each other than light and electricity.

–William Hiram Foulkes

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William Hiram Foulkes, born in Qunicy, Michigan, in 1877, was a Presbyterian minister, a denominational statesman, and a writer of hymns.

The progress of our saint’s career was as follows:

  1. Foulkes graduated from the College of Emporia, Emporia, Kansas, in 1897.  Next he attended McCormick Theological Seminary, where he received the Bernardine Orme Smith Fellowship for general excellence.  He also studied on the graduate level at New College, Edinburgh, Scotland.
  2. Foulkes ministered at churches in Elmira, Illinois; Portland, Oregon; New York, New York; Cleveland, Ohio; and Newark, New Jersey; in that order.
  3. Foulkes served as the General Secretary of the Board of Ministerial Relief and Sustenation of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. from 1913 to 1918.
  4. Foulkes served as the Chairman of the New Era Movement (in full, the New Era Expansion Program) of the denomination.  The purpose of the New Era Movement (1919-1933) was to encourage cooperation among congregations, presbyteries, synods, and denominational boards and agencies to promote stewardship, ecumenism, and missionary education.
  5. Foulkes sat on the General Council of the denomination.
  6. Foulkes contributed to the 1935 Handbook to the 1933 Hymnal.
  7. Foulkes served as the Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. in 1937-1938.
  8. Foulkes retired in 1941.
  9. Foulkes died at Smithtown, New York, in 1961.

Our saint wrote at least three books:

  1. Living Bread from the Fourth Gospel (1914), a devotional volume;
  2. Sunset by the Wayside (1917), a volume of poems; and
  3. Homespun:  Along Friendly Roads (1936), a volume of Christian essays.

He also wrote hymns, including “Take Thou Our Minds, Dear Lord” (1918), which I have added to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  It is a hymn about consecration to God–having the mind of Christ, yielding to God, et cetera.  He wrote it as a devotional text for young people.  Dr. Calvin Weiss Laufer had asked Foulkes to compose words

that will challenge their hearts and minds.

–Quoted in William Chalmers Covert and Calvin Weiss Laufer, eds., Handbook to The Hymnal (Philadelphia, PA:  Presbyterian Board of Christian Education, 1935), page 266

Perhaps the best way to conclude my remarks is to affirm a simple prayer from that hymn:

Guide Thou our ordered lives as Thou dost please.

Amen.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 16, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE VICTIMS OF THE HAITI EARTHQUAKE

THE FEAST OF GEORGE AND LILLIAN WILLOUGHBY, QUAKER PEACE ACTIVISTS

THE FEAST OF SAINT PACHOMIUS, FATHER OF SPIRITUAL COMMUNAL MONASTIC LIFE

THE FEAST OF RICHARD MEUX BENSON, FOUNDER OF THE SOCIETY OF SAINT JOHN THE BAPTIST

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless you for inspiring William Hiram Foulkes

and all who with words have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior, who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 728

Feast of Philip Doddridge (June 26)   4 comments

philip-doddridge

Image in the Public Domain

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PHILIP DODDRIDGE  (JUNE 26, 1702-OCTOBER 26, 1751)

English Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

Philip Doddridge, along with people, such as Isaac Watts and Charles Wesley, occupies space in the pantheon of English-language hymn writers.  He wrote over 400 hymns as follow-ups to sermons.  Unfortunately, as the contents of hymnals change with each generation, the number of great hymns decreases (with some exceptions) as the proportion of substandard praise music (“seven-eleven songs” and other texts with few words) increases (with some exceptions).  One lineage of hymn books documents this pattern.  The Methodist Hymnal (1905) contains twenty-two Doddridge hymns.  The Methodist Hymnal (1935) has eight.  The Methodist Hymnal/The Book of Hymns (1966) contains seven.  And The United Methodist Hymnal (1989) has a not-so-grand total of one.

Doddridge was born in London, England, in 1702.  His father was a wealthy oil merchant.  His mother was the daughter of a Lutheran pastor who had fled persecution in Bohemia.  Family life was devout yet brief, for our saint became an orphan at a young age.  Doddridge, educated at Kingston Grammar School then at the Nonconformist (Congregationalist) school at Kibworth, declined an opportunity to study for Anglican Holy Orders.  He became a Congregationalist minister in 1723 instead.

Doddridge, minister at Kibworth for for a few years, moved to the Castle Hill Meeting (now a congregation of the United Reformed Church) at Northampton in 1729.  There he ministered to a flock of poor people and founded a seminary, where he taught most of the subjects and trained hundreds of clergymen.  This work ended in 1750, when our saint contracted tuberculosis.  He, seeking to restore his health, traveled to Lisbon, Portugal, yet died there the following year.

The publication of Doddridge’s hymns occurred posthumously. And his collected theological works–many of them influential across decades and centuries–filled ten volumes:  I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, and X.  I have added some of Doddridge’s texts to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  There are too many others to include all of them in this post, but here are two:

How gentle God’s commands!

How king his precepts are!

Come, cast your burdens on the Lord,

And trust his constant care.

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Beneath his watchful eye

His saints securely dwell;

That hand which bears all nature up

Shall guard his children well.

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Why should this anxious load

Press down your weary mind?

Haste to your heavenly Father’s throne,

And sweet refreshment find.

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His goodness stands approved,

Unchanged from day to day:

I’ll drop my burden at his feet,

And bear a song away.

and

Ye servants of the Lord,

Each in his office wait,

Observant of his heavenly word,

And watchful at his gate.

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Let all your lamps be bright,

And turn the golden flame;

Gird up your loins, as in his sight,

For awful is his name.

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Watch, ’tis your Lord’s command:

And while we speak he’s near;

Mark the first signal of his hand,

And ready to appear.

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O happy servant he

In such a posture found!

He shall his Lord with rapture see,

And be with honor crowned.

Doddridge’s legacy is a wonderful one.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 15, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., NATIONAL BAPTIST PASTOR

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Philip Doddridge and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

Feast of John Johns (June 23)   Leave a comment

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Above:  Landing Stage, Liverpool, England, 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

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JOHN JOHNS (MARCH 17, 1801-JUNE 23, 1847)

English Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

The hymnal companion volumes from my liturgical library which contain information about John Johns list him as a Presbyterian.  Yet, when I searched online, I found (in one source) a different story–that he was always a Unitarian.  I know from the hymnal companion volumes that a Unitarian minister influenced our saint’s education, but those same books are not reticent to identify a Unitarian as a Unitarian, so their contributors had no reason to conceal anyone’s Unitarian affiliation.  And, according to hymn sites, Johns wrote a hymn about the necessity of being born again.  Thus I list him as a Presbyterian.

John Johns, born in Plymouth, England, in 1801, and educated at Plymouth and Liverpool, entered the Presbyterian ministry in 1820 at Crediton.  Sixteen years later he moved to Liverpool, where he labored among the poor people.  The “minister to the poor” died in 1847 of a fever which was rampant in the district in which he was working.

Johns, a fine poet, published  three volumes of his verse:

  1. Dews of Castille:  A Collection of Poems (1828);
  2. The Valley of the Nymphs (1829); and
  3. Georgiacs of Life (1846).

The Handbook to The Hymnal (1935), Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., refers to our saint’s literary skill and acumen as an organized or work among the poor then concludes that:

….his memory is best cherished because of the offering of his heart and life in the service of the Master among the poor.

–page 419

The following hymn encapsulates his commitments well:

Come, Kingdom of our God,

Sweet reign of light and love,

Shed peace and hope and joy abroad,

And wisdom from above.

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Come, Kingdom of our God,

And make the broad earth thine;

Stretch o’er her lands and isles the rod

That flowers with grace divine.

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Soon may all tribes be blest

With fruit from life’s glad tree;

And in its shade like brothers rest,

Sons of one family.

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Come, Kingdom of God,

And raise thy glorious throne

In worlds by the undying trod,

Where God shall bless His own.

Johns spent much of his life and died serving Christ in the poor people of Liverpool.  He is a natural choice for inclusion in the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 14, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS MACRINA THE ELDER, BASIL THE ELDER, EMILA, NAUCRATIUS, AND PETER OF SEBASTE, FAITHFUL CHRISTIANS OVER THREE GENERATIONS

THE FEAST OF CIVIL RIGHTS MARTYRS AND ACTIVISTS

THE FEAST OF RICARDO MONTALBAN, ACTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT SAVA, FOUNDER OF THE SERBIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served,

and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom

the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

Feast of Charles Coffin (June 20)   1 comment

Map of France 1741

Above:  A Map of France, 1741

Image in the Public Domain

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CHARLES COFFIN (OCTOBER 4, 1676-JUNE 20, 1749)

Roman Catholic Priest and Hymn Writer

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He is one of the few French hymn writers whose poems have become a part of the worship material of America.

–William Chalmers Covert and Calvin Weiss Laufer, eds., Handbook to The Hymnal (Philadelphia, PA:  Presbyterian Board of Christian Education, 1935), page 517

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Father Charles Coffin, born in Buzancy, France, in 1676, received his education at Duplessis College of the University of Paris.  In 1701 he joined the faculty of the College of Doirmans-Beauvais of that university.  Eleven years later our saint became the Principal of the College.  In 1718 Father Coffin became Rector of the University of Paris, a position he held for five years before reverting to Principal of the College of Doirmans-Beauvais.  Those are particulars, mostly of Coffin’s academic career, but not very interesting relative to what follows.

Our saint wrote hymns, some of which exist in English translation.  Perhaps the best summary of Father Coffin’s hymns is that they were

direct and fitted with the spirit of grace.

–Fred L. Precht, Lutheran Worship:  Hymnal Companion (St. Louis, MO:  Concordia Publishing House, 1992), page 575.

I have added translations of some of those graceful hymns to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.

Here is the Yattendon Hymnal (1899) translation of a Coffin masterpiece:

Happy are they, they that love God,

Whose hearts have Christ confest,

Who by His Cross have found their life,

And ‘neath His yoke their rest.

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Glad is the praise, sweet are the songs,

When they together sing;

And strong the prayers that bow the ear

Of heaven’s eternal King.

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Christ to their homes giveth His peace,

And makes their loves His own;

But, ah what tares the evil one

Hath in His garden sown!

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Sad was our lot, evil this earth,

Did not its sorrows prove

The path whereby the sheep may find

The fold of Jesus’ love.

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Then shall they know, they that love Him,

How all their pain is good;

And death itself cannot unbind

Their happy brotherhood.

And here is the John Chandler (1806-1876) translation of an Advent hymn:

The advent of our God

Our prayers must now employ,

And we must meet him on his road

With hymns of holy joy.

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The everlasting Son

Incarnate deigns to be;

Himself a servant’s form puts on

To set his people free.

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Daughter of Sion, rise

To meet thy lowly King,

Nor let thy faithless heart despise

The peace he comes to bring.

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As Judge, on clouds of light,

He soon will come again,

And all his scattered saints unite

With him in heaven to reign.

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Before the dawning day

Let sin’s dark deeds be gone;

The old man all be put away,

The new man all put on.

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All glory to the Son,

Who comes to set us free,

With Father, Spirit, ever One,

Through all eternity.

Coffin, who composed Latin poems, published some of them in 1727.  Nine years later, at the command of the Archbishop of Paris, Coffin prepared the Paris Breviary, which contained most of his hymns.  The Archbishop favored replacing old Latin hymns with new Latin hymns.  (If one is to discard the old in favor of the new, Charles Coffin compositions are the way to go.)  Also in 1736, our saint published Hymni Sacri Auctore Carolo Coffin, containing about a hundred hymns.  A posthumous two-volume set of his complete works followed in 1755.

There was an unfortunate and needless shadow–one which commends Father Coffin in my mind–at the end of his life.  This holy man received neither the last rites nor a Christian burial because a certain priest, citing church politics, denied them.  Our saint had, along with many other French clergymen, objected the papal bull Unigenitus (1713).  Pope Clement XI condemned Jansenism, a movement within the Roman Catholic Church, as heretical.

Many papal bulls were, partially or entirely, bull.  Unigenitus was certainly at least partially bull (less so if one is of a Reformed perspective and more so if one leans toward the Wesleyan-Arminian end of the spectrum).  The document condemned a long list of Jansenist assertions as heresies.  Among these were the following:

  1. There is no role for human free will in salvation.
  2. It is both necessary and useful for all sorts of people to study the Bible.
  3. It is harmful to laity not to study the Bible.

Our saint found parts of the papal bull unacceptable and said so.  This made him a political hot potato at the end of his life, unfortunately.  But I praise God that such a talented and courageous man lived.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 13, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARGUERITE BOURGEOYS, FOUNDER OF THE SISTERS OF NOTRE DAME

THE FEAST OF SAINT HILARY OF POITIERS, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF HUBERT HUMPHREY, UNITED STATES SENATOR AND VICE PRESIDENT

THE FEAST OF SAINT KENTIGERN (MUNGO), ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF GLASGOW

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Charles Coffin)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

Feast of Charitie Lees Smith Bancroft de Chenez (June 21)   1 comment

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Above:  Ireland, October 19, 2012

Image Source = Jet Propulsion Library, NASA

(http://www.dvidshub.net/image/753233/ireland-image-day#.UsH_2_RDsgQ)

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CHARITIE LEES SMITH BANCROFT DE CHENEZ (JUNE 21, 1840-JUNE 20, 1923)

Hymn Writer

Information about the saint born as Charitie Lees Smith can be difficult to find.  I have, in fact, located more words she wrote than facts about her.

Charitie Lees Smith, born in Ireland, was the daughter of the Reverend Sidney Smith, a Rector of the Church of Ireland.  Our saint began to write hymns before she married.  Lyra Britannica (1867), edited by Dr. Charles Rogers, listed her name as “Smith,” as did Hymns for the Church on Earth:  Being Three Hundred Hymns and Spiritual Songs (For the Most Part of Modern Date) (1865), edited by Bishop John Charles Ryle.  In 1869 she married Arthur E. Bancroft.  Nine years later, Lyra Hibernica Sacra, edited by William McIlwaine, listed our saint as “Mrs. Bancroft.”  Mr. Bancroft died eventually, and his widow remarried, this time to one Mr. de Chenez, who she outlived.

Our saint, author of Within the Veil (1867), a collection of her hymns, published some of her texts in aforementioned volumes, where I have found them and from which I have copied them.  They are wordy and excellent compositions.  Exhibit A follows:

The King of glory standeth

Beside that heart of sin,

His mighty voice commandeth

The raging waves within;

The floods of deepest anguish

Roll backward at His will,

As o’er the storm ariseth,

His mandate, “Peace, be still.”

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At times, with sudden glory,

He speaks, and all is done!

Without one stroke of batle

The victory is won:

While we with joy beholding,

Can scarce believe it true,

That e’en our kingly Jesus

Conform such hearts anew.

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He comes in blood-stained garments;

Upon His brow a crown;

The gates of brass fly open,

The iron bonds drop down.

From off the fetter’d captive

The chains of Satan fall,

While angels shout triumphant,

That Christ is Lord of all.

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But sometimes in the stillness,

He gently draweth near,

And whispers words of welcome,

Into the sinner’s ear;

With anxious heart He waileth

The answer of His cry,

That oft repeated question,

“O wherefore wilt Thou die?”

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On, in the gathering darkness,

With wounded feet and sore,

The suppliant Saviour standeth

And knocketh at the door;

The bleak winds howl around Him,

The unbelief and sin;

Yet Jesus waits, entreating

That He may enter in.

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He whispers through the portal;

He woos them with His love;

He calls them to the kingdom

That waits for them above:

He speaks of all the gladness

His yearning heart would give,

Tells of the cleansing fountain,

And bids them, “Wash, and live.”

+++++

Oh, Christ, His love is mighty!

Long-suffering is His grace!

And glorious is the splendor

That beameth from His face!

Our hearts up leap in gladness,

When we behold that love,

As we go singing onward

To dwell with Him above.

I have added more exhibits to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.

All of these texts speak of our saint’s deep Christian faith.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 12, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF HENRY ALFORD, DEAN OF CANTERBURY

THE FEAST OF SAINT AELRED, ABBOT OF RIEVAULX

THE FEAST OF SAINT BENEDICT BISCOP, ABBOT OF JARROW

THE FEAST OF JOHN HORDEN, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF MOOSONEE

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Charitie Lees Smith Bancroft de Chenez and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH