Archive for July 2014

Feast of Joseph Grigg (October 27)   Leave a comment

Burning Bush Logo

Above:  The Burning Bush Logo

Image in the Public Domain

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JOSEPH GRIGG (CIRCA 1720-OCTOBER 29, 1768)

English Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

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Joseph Grigg, born into an impoverished English family circa 1720, quit work as a mechanic in his twenties to become the full-time Assistant Minister of Silver Street Presbyterian Church, London.  In 1747 the Senior Minister, Thomas Bures died.  Shortly thereafter Grigg, recently married to a wealthy widow, resigned his position of about four years and retired to St. Albans, where he devoted his time to literary pursuits.  These included The Voice of Danger, the Voice of God (1756), Miscellanies on Moral and Religious Subjects (1756), and Four Hymns on Divine Subjects Wherein the Patience and Love of Our Divine Saviour is Displayed (1765).

Our saint wrote more than forty hymns, starting at his tenth year of life.  At that tender age Grigg wrote “Jesus, and Shall It Ever Be,” which he published in Four Hymns (1765).  Multiple versions of this hymn exist.  There is, of course, the original text, but perhaps the most often sung version is the Benjamin Francis (1734-1799) reworking from 1787.  Another hymn our saint wrote was “Behold, a Stranger at the Door,” originally twelve stanzas long.  The Lutheran Hymnal (1941) version has just five stanzas, however.

One stanza Grigg wrote remains in my mind as a succinct summary of the reality of the lives of many people:

Behold a Stranger at the door!

He gently knocks, has knocked before,

Has waited long, is waiting still;

You treat no other friend so ill.

Our saint died at Walthamstow, Essex, England, on October 29, 1768.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 25, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JAMES BAR-ZEBEDEE, APOSTLE AND MARTYR

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Joseph Grigg and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Daniel C. Roberts (October 24)   1 comment

New Hampshire Flag

Above:  The Flag of New Hampshire

Image in the Public Domain

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DANIEL CRANE ROBERTS (NOVEMBER 5, 1841-OCTOBER 31, 1907)

Episcopal Priest and Hymn Writer

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I remain a country parson, known only within my small world.

–Daniel C. Crane

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That “country parson” wrote a famous patriotic hymn, “God of Our Fathers” (1876) for the Centennial July 4th celebration in Brandon, Vermont, where he was a pastor that year.  The hymn’s first appearance in a hymnbook was in the Episcopal Hymnal of 1892.

Roberts, born in Bridgehampton, Long Island, New York, on November 5, 1841, led the kind of mostly quiet life which does not attract much attention.  He graduated from Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, in 1857.  During the U.S. Civil War our saint served (as a Private) in the 84th Ohio Volunteers, U.S. Army.  Then Roberts, ordained to the diaconate in 1865 and the priesthood the following year, ministered in the following places, in order:

  1. Christ Church, Montpelier, Vermont;
  2. St. John’s Church, Lowell, Massachusetts;
  3. St. Thomas Church, Brandon, Vermont; and
  4. St. Paul’s Church, Concord, New Hampshire (1878-1901).

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Above:  Grand Army of the Republic Poster, August 29, 1888

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-pga-01396

Certainly many people knew him or at least knew of him.  He served as the chaplain of the Grand Army of the Republic, an organization of U.S. Army Civil War veterans, in New Hampshire.  Roberts also served as the President of the New Hampshire Historical Society for some time.  And the man was certainly made positive differences in the lives of many parishioners.  But he was, like most of us in the human race, known mainly to a relatively small circle of people.  Unlike most of the rest of us, however, our saint wrote a famous hymn.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 25, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JAMES BAR-ZEBEDEE, APOSTLE AND MARTYR

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Daniel C. Roberts and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Emily Huntington Miller (October 22)   1 comment

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Above:  Bird’s-Eye View of Northwestern University, Circa 1907

Copyright Claimant = George R. Lawrence Company

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-USZ62-53414

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EMILY HUNTINGTON MILLER (OCTOBER 22, 1833-NOVEMBER 2, 1913)

U.S. Methodist Author and Hymn Writer

Emily Huntington, daughter of the Reverend Thomas Huntington, a Methodist Episcopal minister at Brooklyn, Connecticut, entered the world there on October 22, 1833.  She graduated from Oberlin College in 1857 and married Professor John E. Miller three years later.  She devoted most of her professional life to writing prose and verse, mainly for children.

One outlet for her talents was editing magazines.  From 1867 to 1875 she edited The Little Corporal (1865-1875), a children’s magazine on which both Millers worked full-time for the last five years.  Financial realities overtook the publication, however, so St. Nicholas Magazine (1873-1940, 1943) absorbed The Little Corporal.  Our saint also worked as an Associate Editor at The Ladies Home Journal.

Hymntime.com lists thirty hymns which Miller wrote.  Among them are;

  1. I Love to Hear the Story” (1867, debuting in The Little Corporal);
  2. Tell the Blessed Tidings” (circa 1903);
  3. God of All Comfort;”
  4. Oh Realm of Light” (1893); and
  5. Enter Thy Temple, Glorious King!” (1861, for the dedication of the new building of First Methodist Episcopal Church, Akron, Ohio).

Our saint also wrote books, including:

  1. The Parish of Fair Haven (1876);
  2. Captain Fritz:  His Friends and Adventures (1877);
  3. Little Neighbors (1879);
  4. What Tommy Did (1885);
  5. What Happened on Christmas Eve (1888);
  6. Helps and Hinderances (1892);
  7. Home Talk About the Word; for Mothers and Children (1894);
  8. From Avalon, and Other Poems (1896);
  9. An Offering of Thanks (1899); and
  10. The Little Lad of Bethlehem Town (1911).

Miller worked as the Dean of Women at Northwestern, Evanston, Illinois, from 1891 to 1898.  That institution awarded her the honorary degree L.H.D. (Doctor of Humane Letters) in 1909.

Our saint died at her brother’s home in Northfield, Minnesota, on November 2, 1913.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 25, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JAMES BAR-ZEBEDEE, APOSTLE AND MARTYR

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Emily Huntington Miller and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Katharina von Schlegal (October 21)   Leave a comment

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Above:  The Castle of Dessau, Anhalt, Germany, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsca-00029

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KATHARINA AMALIA DOROTHEA VON SCHLEGAL (OCTOBER 22, 1697-CIRCA 1768)

German Lutheran Hymn Writer

We know little about the life of Katharina von Schlegal; we are not even certain of some reported details or the year of her death.  Some sources indicate that she was the head of a stilt, a Lutheran nunnery, at Kothen (Anhalt), but the records of that stilt do not list her as having been such.  She does seem to have been part of the ducal court of the Count of Stolberg-Wernigerode in the early 1750s, during the reign (1710-1771) of Count Christian Ernst (1691-1771).  Some correspondence with the next Count, Heinrich Ernst (1716-1778), author of more than four hundred published hymns, has survived.

Our saint wrote twenty-nine published hymns.  Of these only one exists in English.  Jane Laurie Borthwick rendered five of the six stanzas of that text in English in 1855.  A modernized version of four stanzas from that translation, as found in the Lutheran Worship Hymnal Companion (1992), pages 515-516, follows:

Be still, my soul; the Lord is on your side;

Bear patiently the cross of grief or pain;

Leave to your God to order and provide;

In ev’ry change he faithful will remain.

Be still, my soul; your best, your heav’nly Friend

Through thorny ways leads to a joyful end.

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Be still, my soul; your God will undertake

To guide the future as he has the past.

Your hope, your confidence let nothing shake;

All now mysterious shall be bright at last.

Be still, my soul; the waves and wind shall know

His voice who ruled them while he dwelt below.

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Be still, my soul; though dearest friends depart

And all is darkened in the vale of tears;

Then you will better know his love, his heart,

Who comes to soothe your sorrows and your fears.

Be still, my soul; your Jesus can repay

From his own fullness all he takes away.

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Be still, my soul; the hour is hast’ning on

When we shall be forever with the Lord,

When disappointment, grief, and fear are gone,

Sorrow, forgot, love’s purest joys restored.

Be still, my soul; when change and tears are past,

All safe and blessed we shall meet at last.

For the sake of completeness in the English language one might add the following stanza at the end:

Be still, my soul; begin the song of praise

On earth, believing, in your Lord on high;

Acknowledge him in all your words and ways,

So shall he view you with a well-pleased eye.

Be still, my soul; the Sun of life divine

Through passing clouds shall but more brightly shine.

We know enough about Katharina von Schlegal, I think.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 24, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THOMAS A KEMPIS, SPIRITUAL WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINTS JOHN BOSTE, GEORGE SWALLOWELL, AND JOHN INGRAM, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYRS

THE FEAST OF JOHN NEWTON, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Katharina von Schlegal and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Walter John Mathams (October 21)   1 comment

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Above:  General View, Swanage, Dorset, England, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-08875

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WALTER JOHN MATHAMS (OCTOBER 30, 1853-JANUARY 29, 1931)

British Baptist then Presbyterian Minister, Author, and Hymn Writer

Walter John Mathams led an interesting life.  He, born in London, England, on October 20, 1853, spent part of his early life at sea.  During one voyage he found himself shipwrecked and forced into the Brazilian Army during Brazil’s war with Paraguay (1864-1870).  Our saint did arrive back home safely, though.

Mathams spent part of his life as a Baptist minister.  In 1874 he commenced his studies at Regent’s Park Baptist College, Oxford.  For a few years he served a church at Preston, Lancashire, but bad health forced him to leave for Australia in 1879.  There he also served in the ministerial capacity.  Our saint returned to the British Isles, assuming a pastorate at Falkirk, Scotland, in 1883.  Five years later he transferred to Birmingham, England.

From 1900 to 1931 Mathams was a Presbyterian.  He served in Egypt as a chaplain in the Royal Army (1903-1906); as associate minister at Stronsay, Orkney (1906-1909); and as pastor at St. Columba’s Church, Mallaig, Inverness (1909-1919).  He retired to Roslin, Scotland.  After our saint’s wife, Alexa Jane Mathams, died, however, he relocated to Swanage, Dorset, England, where he died on January 29, 1931.

Mathams survived his son, Robert, who died in 1924 of World War I-related injuries.  Our saint did live long enough, however, to know his granddaughter, Anne Muirhead Mathams (1913-2011), an educator and advocate for those with physical disabilities.

Our saint wrote books and hymns.  His books included:

  1. At Jesu’s Feet (1876), a collection of hymns;
  2. Fireside Parables (1879);
  3. Rough Sermons;
  4. Jack Ahoy;
  5. Comrades All;
  6. Maxim Shots for Soldiers;
  7. A Bowl of the Golden Chants;
  8. Maxims for Boys; and
  9. Sunday Parables (1883).

Hymntime.com lists eighteen hymns Mathams wrote.  I have added three of these to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog:

  1. Christ of the Upward Way;”
  2. Jesus, Friend of Little Children” (1882, for the Baptist Psalms and Hymns for School and Home); and
  3. Now in the Days of Youth” (debuted in Worship and Song, 1913, yet existed for years before that).

Hymntime.com also provides the words to two other hymns:

  1. God is With Us” (1896); and
  2. Stand Fast for Christ Thy Saviour!” (1913).

Mathams was involved in the Sailors’ Society (1818), an ecumenical ministry to seafarers.  This made sense, due to his maritime past.  In fact, he founded the Ladies’ Guild thereof.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 24, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THOMAS A KEMPIS, SPIRITUAL WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINTS JOHN BOSTE, GEORGE SWALLOWELL, AND JOHN INGRAM, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYRS

THE FEAST OF JOHN NEWTON, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Walter John Mathams and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Philip Schaff and John Williamson Nevin (October 19)   3 comments

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Above:  Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 1921

J247993–U.S. Copyright Office

Image Source = Library of Congress

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PHILIP SCHAFF (JANUARY 1, 1819-OCTOBER 20, 1893)

and

JOHN WILLIAMSON NEVIN (FEBRUARY 20, 1803-JUNE 6, 1886)

U.S. German Reformed Historians, Theologians, and Liturgists

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Cardinal John Henry Newman, a famous convert from Anglicanism to Roman Catholicism, said that to understand church history is to cease to be a Protestant.  I understand why Cardinal Newman thought that, given his spiritual biography and the widespread neglect of Christian history among many Protestants during his lifetime, but that statement did not reflect the reality of Philip Schaff and John Williamson Nevin, who called the German Reformed Church in the U.S.A. (the Reformed Church in the United States from 1863 to 1934) away from its historical amnesia and indifference, Puritanism, Pietism, Revivalism, and Zwinglianism.  These men worked to take their denomination back to its roots in the Protestant Reformation, recovering its Reformed Eucharistic and liturgical heritage while renouncing anti-Roman Catholicism.

Philip Schaff, born on January 1, 1819, at Chur, Switzerland, attended the Universities of Tubingen, Halle, and Berlin.  He immigrated to the United States in 1843 to teach at the German Reformed Seminary at Mercersburg, Pennsylvania.  He, a church historian, championed the subject at a time when many U.S. Evangelicals had little use for it.  Nevertheless, Schaff argued that Protestantism stood in continuity with Medieval Roman Catholicism, not Pauline Christianity.  He advocated taking the German Reformed Church in the U.S.A. back to the liturgical and Eucharistic theology of John Calvin.  In contrast, the dominant influences in the denomination at the time were Puritanism, Pietism, Revivalism, and Zwinglianism, the latter with its memorial meal theology of the Lord’s Supper.  For his trouble Schaff faced a heresy trial in 1845.  The tribunal dismissed all charges unanimously.

Schaff’s theological partner in the Mercersburg Theology was John Williamson Nevin, born on February 20, 1803, in Franklin County, Pennsylvania.  Nevin, of Scotch-Irish ancestry, was originally a Presbyterian.  He, graduated from Union College in 1821 and Princeton Theological Seminary in 1828, received his license to preach in the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. that year.  From 1830 to 1840 he taught Biblical literature at the former Western Theological Seminary, Allegheny, Pennsylvania.  Then Nevin, dissatisfied with the Puritanical influences in the Presbyterian Church, left for the German Reformed Church and became a Professor of Theology at the Mercersburg seminary (1840-1851) and President of the former Marshall College (1841-1853).

A mighty dragon Schaff and Nevin had to combat as part of their effort to recover historical awareness and renew liturgical life in the German Reformed Church in the U.S.A. was anti-Roman Catholicism.  As Frank C. Senn wrote:

In America, Protestant liturgical recovery in the nineteenth century not only went up against Puritanism, Pietism, and Revivalism, but also against that cultural-political expression of anti-Catholic bigotry known as “Know-Nothingism.”

Christian Liturgy:  Catholic and Evangelical (Minneapolis, MN:  Fortress Press, 1997), page 581

There was, in the middle of the 1800s, a political party known variously as the Native American Party, American Republican Party, or simply the American Party, but informally as the “Know-Nothing Party,” devoted to xenophobia and opposition to Roman Catholicism, notably Roman Catholic immigrants.  The list of people they liked consisted of other bigoted Anglo-Saxon Protestants.

Our saints sought to revive not only the Continental European Reformed liturgical tradition (that of service books) in the German Reformed Church in the U.S.A., but the Calvinistic Eucharistic theology of the non-localized mystical presence of Christ in the sacrament.  Toward that end Nevin wrote The Mystical Presence:  A Vindication of the Calvinistic Doctrine of the Eucharist (1846).  Nevin, who considered the Lord’s Supper to be “the very heart of the whole Christian worship,” was, like Schaff, more traditional than those who considered them heretics and innovators.  Nevin and Schaff were closer to the Reformed traditions than were Pietists, Revivalists, and Puritans.

Ironically, as late as 1861, Schaff, who was busy resisting anti-Roman Catholic bigotry, had yet to slay racism inside himself.  That year he wrote Slavery and the Bible, the contents of which were–and remain–indefensible.  He was ahead of his time in some ways yet sadly of it in others.  I include this detail for the sake of thoroughness and honesty.

Schaff and Nevin belonged to the committee which produced A Liturgy:  or, Order of Christian Worship (1857), for provisional use in the German Reformed Church in the U.S.A.  In 1866 it became official as An Order of Worship for the Reformed Church.  Nevin wrote the Vindication of of the Revised Liturgy, Historical and Theological (1867) to defend against charges of “Romanizing tendencies”  Such allegations prompted the (Dutch) Reformed Church in America to terminate (for a time) relations with the German Reformed Church/Reformed Church in the United States in the late 180os.

Schaff’s career from 1863 to 1893 was as follows:

  1. Chairman of the Sabbath Committee, New York City, 1863-1870;
  2. Chair of Christian Encyclopedia and Symbolism, Union Theological Seminary, New York City, 1870-1873;
  3. Professor of Sacred Literature, Union Theological Seminary, 1874-1887; and
  4. Professor of Church History, Union Theological Seminary, 1887-1893.

During his career Schaff added many other impressive accomplishments to this already mostly auspicious list.  A partial enumeration follows:

  1. He edited the twenty-five volumes of the English-language translation of Johann Peter Lange’s Commentary on the Holy Scriptures (1865-1880), available at archive.org.
  2. Schaff published a hymnal, Christ in Song:  Songs of Immanuel (1869) and co-edited a second hymnal, Hymns and Songs of Praise for Public and Social Worship (1874).
  3. He edited German and Latin hymns into English.  Among these was “O Bread of Life from Heaven.”
  4. Schaff edited Volumes I, II, and III of The Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge (1882-1884).
  5. He wrote the eight-volume History of the Christian Church (1882-1892).  His son, Presbyterian minister and scholar David Schley Schaff (1852-1941), revised those volumes and added two more.
  6. Schaff published Volumes I, II, and III of The Creeds of Christendom, with a History and Critical Notes (1877).
  7. He published the fourteen volumes of A Select Library of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church (1886-1890), available at archive.org.
  8. Schaff founded the American Society of Church History in 1884.
  9. He served as President of the American Revision Committee, thereby contributing to the American Standard Version of the Bible (1901), from which other translations have sprung directly and indirectly.  These include the Revised Standard Version (1946/1952), its 1971 revision, its two Catholic editions (1965 and 2002), the New Revised Standard Version (1989), its Roman Catholic edition (1993), the New American Standard Bible (1971/1977) and its updated edition (1995), the Living Bible (1969/1971), its Roman Catholic edition (1972), the New Living Translation (1996/2004), and the English Standard Version (2001).

Schaff, who died at New York City on October 20, 1893, worked for church unity.  His Reformed theology of ecumenism led him to oppose both Papal Infallibility and the Anglican/Episcopalian Chicago-Lambeth Quadrilateral.  The inclusion of Apostolic Succession in the latter troubled him.  He was correct, however, that Papal Infallibility functions as an obstacle to Christian unity.

Schaff left an impressive literary and scholarly legacy.  Among its other components were:

  1. The Principle of Protestantism as Related to the Present State of the Church (1845);
  2. The Life and Labors of St. Augustine:  A Historical Sketch (1854);
  3. The Oldest Manual Called the Teaching of the Twelve Apostles:  The Didache and Kindred Documents in the Original (1855);
  4. The Moral Character of Christ; or the Perfection of Christ’s Humanity, a Proof of His Divinity (1861);
  5. A Catechism for Sunday Schools and Families in Fifty-Two Lessons, with Proof-Texts and Notes (1862; revised in 1880);
  6. The Harmony of the Reformed Confessions as Related to the Present State of Evangelical Theology (1877);
  7. Through Bible Lands:  Notes on Travel in Egypt, the Desert, and Palestine (1878);
  8. A Dictionary of the Bible (First Edition, 1880; Second Edition, 1881; Third Edition, 1885, Fourth Edition, 1887);
  9. A Library of Religious Poetry (1881);
  10. A Companion to the Greek New Testament and the English Version (1883);
  11. Church and State in the United States, or the American Idea of Religious Liberty and Its Practical Effects, with Official Documents (1888);
  12. The Progress of Religion as Shown in the History of Toleration Acts (1889); and
  13. The Renaissance:  The Revival of Learning and Art in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries (1891).

Nevin taught history at the merged Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, from 1861 to 1866 then served as the President for a decade.  He died at Lancaster on June 6, 1886.  He also left a written legacy, which included, apart from The Mystical Presence (1846), the 1857/1866 German Reformed Liturgy, and the Vindication (1867) thereof, the following:

  1. A Summary of Biblical Antiquities:  Compiled for the Use of Sunday-School Teachers, and for the Benefit of Families, Volumes I and II (1829);
  2. The Scourge of God (1832);
  3. The Anxious Bench (First Edition, 1843; Second Edition, 1844); in German here;
  4. History and Genius of the Heidelberg Catechism (1847);
  5. A Summary of Biblical Antiquities; for the Use of Schools, Bible-Classes, and Families (1849);
  6. Man’s True Destiny (1853); and
  7. Christian Hymnology (1856);
  8. Life and Character of Frederick Augustus Rauch, First President of Marshall College (1859).

Philip Schaff and John Williamson Nevin were giants in the Church.  Those of us who pursue interests in ecclesiastical history and/or liturgy stand on their shoulders.  Certainly those from the Reformed tradition who encourage proper Eucharistic practice and better liturgy stand on their broad shoulders.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 23, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEASTS OF PHILIP EVANS AND JOHN LLOYD, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS AND MARTYRS

THE FEAST OF ADELAIDE TEAGUE CASE, PROFESSOR OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

THE FEAST OF SAINT OLAF II OF SWEDEN, KING AND MARTYR

THE FEAST OF SUSANNA WESLEY, MOTHER OF METHODISM

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O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Philip SchaffJohn Williamson Nevin, and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

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Feast of Claudia Frances Ibotson Hernaman (October 19)   Leave a comment

Compass Rose Flag

Above:  The Compass Rose Flag

Image Source = Alekjds

(http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Compassrose_Flag.svg)

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CLAUDIA FRANCES IBOTSON HERNAMAN (OCTOBER 19, 1838-OCTOBER 10, 1898)

Anglican Hymn Writer and Translator

Claudia Frances Ibotson, born at Addlestone, England, on October 19, 1838, was daughter of the Reverend W. H. Ibotson, a priest of the Church of England.  At a young age she wrote for church publications.  Thus began her literary career, which included short stories, but consisted mainly of religious texts for children.  Our saint, who married the Reverend J. W. D. Hernaman, also an Anglican priest, found her vocation:  religious education of the young.  Her publications included:

  1. The Child’s Book of Praise (1873);
  2. The Story of the Resurrection (1879);
  3. Christmas Story (1881);
  4. Christmas Carols for Children (1884 and 1885);
  5. The Altar Hymnal (1884) (as a contributor and a co-compiler);
  6. Hymns for the Seven Words from the Cross (1885);
  7. The Crown of Life (1886); and
  8. Lyra Consolationis from the Poets of the Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Centuries (1890).

Hernaman’s hymn output came to about 150 texts between translations and compositions.  She translated a Joseph Mohr hymn from German as “Holy Spirit, Hear Us.” Perhaps her most famous hymn was the great Lenten text, “Lord, Who Throughout These Forty Days,” which debuted in print in 1873.  Less well known is the following Christmas hymn:

Chorus:

Haste we to greet Him lying today

In a poor stable all on the hay.

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You who are wealthy, come worship him low,

Jesus the King in humility know;

He it is ruleth the city on high,

Prince of the angels and Lord of the sky!

Chorus

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You who are poor, His deep poverty see,

Poorer than you would your Master be;

No cottage house now may shelter his head,

Only a manger for Him in a shed.

Chorus

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Unto the wealthy is whispering the Child:

“Say would ye find Me so gentle and mild,

I am the poor, still in them I have need,

Naked and hungry, then clothe me and feed.”

Chorus

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Unto the poor He so tenderly cries:

“Yours are the riches stored up in the skies;

In those bright mansions on high shall ye live,

Angels are waiting their welcome to give.”

Chorus

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Both unto rich and poor, one is the call,

Worship and love Him who loveth us all;

So when He comes in His glory again,

We, made like Jesus, with Jesus shall reign.

Chorus

Our saint died at Brussels, Belgium, on October 10, 1898.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 18, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ARTHUR PENRHYN STANLEY, ANGLICAN DEAN OF WESTMINSTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF BARTHOLOME DE LAS CASAS, WITNESS FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Claudia Frances Ibotson Hernaman and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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