Feast of Karl Friedrich Lochner (February 20)   Leave a comment

Germany 1648

Above:  Map of Germany in 1648, after the Peace of Westphalia

Scanned from Hammond’s World Atlas–Classics Edition (1957)

As Voltaire explained correctly, the Holy Roman Empire was neither holy nor Roman nor an empire. 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

KARL FRIEDRICH LOCHNER (APRIL 2, 1634-FEBRUARY 25, 1697)

German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer

Whom should I give my heart’s affection

But Thee, who givest Thine to faith?

Thy fervent love is my protection;

Lord, Thou hast loved me unto death.

My heart with Thine shall ever be

One heart throughout eternity.

–From The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), Hymn 404, a composite translation of a Lochner hymn from 1673

Karl Friedrich Lochner was a poet, an academic, and a minister.  He entered the world at Nuremberg, Germany, on April 2, 1634, where his father, Friedrich Lochner (1602-1672/1673), was a municipal official.  Friedrich, also a poet, belonged to the Order of the Society of Pegnitz Shepherds (in short, the Pegnitz Order), devoted to the purification and improvement of the German language.  He rose from the rank of notary public to clerk of the Board of Works to the registrar at the Chancery.  Friedrich also married Florentine Heinrich (before 1620-after 1650), with whom he had eight children–four sons and four daughters.  Our saint was the firstborn son and offspring.

Young Karl Friedrich studied at Breslau, Altdorf, and Rostock before becoming a lecturer in logic and metaphysics at Rostock then at Nuremberg.  Another vocation beckoned, however, so he became a minister.  At first our saint assisted at Worhd then at Furth.  In 1663, after the senior pastor died, Lochner succeeded him in that post.  Our saint held that post for the rest of his life, which ended on February 25, 1697.

Our saint, the husband of Sabina Mayer (1638/1639-1704) from October 28, 1660 until his death and the father of ten children–six sons and four daughters–joined the Pegnitz Order in 1671.  Three years later Sigismund von Birken (1626-1681), Chief Shepherd of the order, presented him with the poet’s wreath.  Lochner’s hymns, some of which exist in English translations, have lasted much longer than that wreath.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 23, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN THE ALMSGIVER, ROMAN CATHOLIC PATRIARCH OF ALEXANDRIA

THE FEAST OF PHILLIPS BROOKS, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF MASSACHUSETTS

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Karl Friedrich Lochner and others, who have written hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: