Feast of Charles Todd Quintard (February 16)   4 comments

Above:  Charles Todd Quintard

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-cwpbh-01430

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CHARLES TODD QUINTARD (DECEMBER 22, 1824-FEBRUARY 16, 1898)

Episcopal Bishop of Tennessee

Bishop Charles Todd Quintard comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Episcopal Church.  Quintard is one of many saints listed in the side calendar (Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints, 2010; and A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  A Calendar of Commemorations, 2016), but not the main calendar (Lesser Feasts and Fasts, most recently revised in 2018, and in 2006, immediately prior to that).  Likewise, many saints listed in Lesser Feasts and Fasts are not in the side calendar.  Episcopal hagiography is not a simple matter.

Charles Todd Quintard, son of Dr. Isaac Quintard, M.D., was a physician prior to entering ordained ministry.  He, born in Stamfort, Connecticut, on December 22, 1824, descended from Huguenots.  Quintard studied at University Medical Center, New York University, and Bellevue Hospital prior to becoming an M.D. in 1847.  Our saint, a physician in Athens, Georgia, and a parishioner at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, from 1848 to 1851, moved to Memphis, Tennessee, to each at Memphis Medical College.  Our saint, with the support of James Hervey Otey, the Bishop of Tennessee, began to study for Holy Orders in 1854.  Otey ordained Quintard in 1856.

Quintard was a priest for about nine years before joining the ranks of bishops.  He was briefly the Rector of Calvary Episcopal Church, Memphis (1856-1857), then the Rector of the Episcopal Church of the Advent, Nashville (1857f).  Our saint, a High Churchman, served as a surgeon and a chaplain in the Confederate Army.  He compiled the Confederate Soldiers’ Pocket Manual of Devotions (1863) and Balm for the Weary and the Wounded (1864).

Quintard became the Bishop of Tennessee, succeeding the deceased James Hervey Otey, serving from October 1865 to February 1898.  He built up the Diocese of Tennessee and The University of the South, founding its School of Theology, as well.  The Diocese of Tennessee, Quintard insisted, had to be open to all who came, so he opposed any barriers.  Our saint, therefore, opposed pew rentals.  Although race-based chattel slavery had been the cornerstone of the Confederacy, as Vice President Alexander Hamilton Stephens had said openly in Savannah, Georgia, in March 1861, the bishop, a former Confederate Army chaplain, opposed racially-segregated congregations.  He also established programs to help poor people.  Furthermore, Quintard helped to found Hoffman Hall, Fisk University, Nashville, as a seminary for African Americans.

Quintard was in Meridian, Georgia, in McIntosh County and near Darien, for health reasons, when he died on February 16, 1898.  He was 73 years old.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 19, 2918 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT THEODORE OF TARSUS, ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

THE FEAST OF SAINT EMILY DE RODAT, FOUNDRESS OF THE CONGREGATION OF THE HOLY FAMILY OF VILLEFRANCHE

THE FEAST OF WALTER CHALMERS SMITH, SCOTTISH PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF WALTER DALRYMPLE MACLAGAN, ARCHBISHOP OF YORK AND HYMN WRITER

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Mighty God, we bless your Name for the example of your bishop Charles Todd Quintard,

who opposed the segregation of African Americans in separate congregations and condemned the exclusion of the poor;

and we pray that your Church may be a refuge for all, for the honor of your Name;

through Jesus Christ, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) 34:14-19

Psalm 94:2-15

Romans 14:10-13

Luke 14:15-24

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 227

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4 responses to “Feast of Charles Todd Quintard (February 16)

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  1. Pingback: Feast of the Martyrs of Memphis, Tennessee, 1878 (September 9) | SUNDRY THOUGHTS

  2. Pingback: Feast of Donald S. Armentrout (April 22) | SUNDRY THOUGHTS

  3. Thanks for highlighting another godly man!

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