Archive for April 2020

Cat Puns   2 comments

  1. Don’t engage in lion about big cats.
  2. The feline mountain climber had excellent cat skills.
  3. Two cats met via purrsonal ads.
  4. The kitten’s antics gave his humans pause.
  5. When the cat stole the note, there was a case of a purrloined letter.  This joke might be in Poe taste, as Edgar Allan would say.

Feast of David Abeel (June 13)   Leave a comment

Above:  David Abeel, Jr.

Image in the Public Domain

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

DAVID ABEEL, JR. (JUNE 2, 1804-SEPTEMBER 4, 1846)

U.S. Dutch Reformed Minister and Missionary to China

David Abeel, Jr., comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Abeel served God.  He would have served God longer than he did, except for fragile health.  Our saint, born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, on June 12, 1804, was a son of David Abeel (Sr.) and Jane Hassert Abeel.  David, Jr., a medical student at Rutgers University, had a religious epiphany.  Afterward, he studied theology.  Abeel graduated from New Brunswick Theological Seminary, New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 1826.  He, ordained a minister in the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church (now the Reformed Church in America) in 1826, served as a pastor in Athens, New York, until the winter of 1828.  Our saint, his health failing, recovered in Antigua and Barbuda.  He returned to the United States in 1829.  Abeel became a chaplain in the Seaman’s Friend Society that year.

Asia beckoned.  Abeel spent 1830-1834 in Asia.  He arrived in Canton, Chinma, in 1830.  Our saint mastered Chinese, worked as a missionary for his denomination, and visited other areas (Java, Siam, and Singapore) to evaluate them for missionary potential.  Abeel, his health failing again, returned to the United States via Europe.  On the way home, he recruited European women to teach Asian women.  Abeel, in the United States again from 1835 to 1839, wrote several books and encouraged missionary work.  He served in various parts of Asia in 1839-1845.  Finally, our saint’s health broken, he returned to the United States.

Abeel, aged 42 years, died in Albany, New York, on September 4, 1846.

One may legitimately wonder how much more Abeel could and would have done had he lived longer and been healthier.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 30, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JAMES MONTGOMERY, ANGLICAN AND MORAVIAN HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF DIET EMAN; HER FIANCÉ, HEIN SIETSMA, MARTYR, 1945; AND HIS BROTHER, HENDRIK “HENK” SIETSMA; RIGHTEOUS AMONG THE NATIONS

THE FEAST OF JAMES RUSSELL MACDUFF AND GEORGE MATHESON, SCOTTISH PRESBYTERIAN MINISTERS AND AUTHORS

THE FEAST OF SARAH JOSEPHA BUELL HALE, POET, AUTHOR, EDITOR, AND PROPHETIC WITNESS

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Almighty and everlasting God, we thank you for your servant David Abeel,

whom you called to preach the Gospel in Asia.

Raise up in this and every land evangelists and heralds of your kingdom,

that your Church may proclaim the unsearchable riches of our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Isaiah 52:1-10

Psalm 96 or 96:1-7

Acts 1:1-9

Luke 10:1-9

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 716

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Bicycle Puns   Leave a comment

  1. “I don’t have a bicycle,” she spoke.
  2. Is using a bicycle again recycling?  And, if I tell this joke prematurely in the State of Washington, have I Spokane too soon?
  3. The person who said something inaccurate about bicycle wheels misspoke.

Posted April 29, 2020 by neatnik2009 in Puns--Transportation

Tagged with , ,

Feast of Frederick C. Grant and Robert M. Grant (June 10)   Leave a comment

Above:  Union Theological Seminary, New York, New York

Image Source = Google Earth

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

FREDERICK CLIFTON GRANT (FEBRUARY 2, 1891-JULY 11, 1974)

Episcopal Priest and New Testament Scholar

Also known as F. C. Grant

father of

ROBERT MCQUEEN GRANT (NOVEMBER 25, 1917-JUNE 10, 2014)

Episcopal Priest and Patristic Scholar

The Grants come to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via my library.  That collection of books includes The Interpreter’s Bible (twelve volumes, 1951f), which lists Frederick C. Grant as one of the Consulting Editors, as well as the author of the Introduction to and the Exegesis of the Gospel of Mark in Volume VII (1951).  Robert M. Grant‘s contribution is the General Article, “The History of the Interpretation of the Bible:  I.  Ancient Period” (Volume I, 1951).  My library also contains The Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible (four volumes, 1962), to which both Grants contributed.  Furthermore, I own a copy of Robert M. Grant’s Early Christianity and Society:  Seven Studies (1977).

Frederick C. Grant was one of the most prominent scholars of the New Testament during his lifetime.  He, born in Beloit, Wisconsin, on February 2, 1891, graduated from the General Theological Seminary, New York, New York, in 1912.  Our saint, ordained a deacon (1912) then a priest (1913) in The Episcopal Church, earned his Master of Sacred Theology (1916) then his doctorate (1922) from Western Theological Seminary.  He was also the husband of Helen McQueen Hardie (Grant), who gave birth to Robert M. Grant in Evanston, Illinois, on November 25, 1917.  Frederick, a longtime Professor of Biblical Theology at Union Theological Seminary, New York, New York, helped to translate the Revised Standard Version (1946, 1952) of the Bible.  He also published books, mostly about the New Testament and the influences (Jewish, Hellenistic, and Roman) that shaped it.  Our saint argued that the authors of the Synoptic Gospels shared the same sources.  Frederick, aged 83 years, died on July 11, 1974.

Robert M. Grant was a chip off the old block.  He, a graduate of Northwestern University (B.A., 1938), continued his education at the Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Massachusetts (1938-1939); Columbia University, New York, New York (1939-1940); and Union Theological Seminary (B.D., 1941).  Robert, ordained an Episcopal priest in 1942, studied further at Harvard Divinity School (ST.M., 1942; Th.D., 1944) while serving at St. James’s Church, South Groveland, Massachusetts.  He had married Margaret Huntington Horton on December 21, 1940.  Our saint served on the faculty at The School of Theology, The University of the South, Sewannee, Tennessee, from 1944 to 1953.  He was one of the eight faculty members who resigned in protest over the trustees’ refusal to admit African Americans.  Starting in 1953, Robert served on the faculty of the Divinity School, The University of Chicago, for decades.  His commitment to civil rights remained.  Our saint marched at Selma, Alabama, in 1965, for example.

Robert M. Grant was, in his adult lifetime, the greatest U.S. scholar of ancient Christianity.  He wrote more than 38 books and articles about topics ranging from Patristics to German u-boats from World War I.

Robert M. Grant, aged 96 years, died in Chicago, Illinois, on June 10, 2014.

Frederick C. Grant and Robert M. Grant, father and son, left written legacies from which Christians can still benefit.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 29, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CATHERINE OF SIENA, ROMAN CATHOLIC MYSTIC AND RELIGIOUS

THE FEAST OF SAINTS BOSA OF YORK, JOHN OF BEVERLEY, WILFRID THE YOUNGER, AND ACCA OF HEXHAM, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS

THE FEAST OF JAMES EDWARD WALSH, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY BISHOP AND POLITICAL PRISONER IN CHINA

THE FEAST OF SIMON B. PARKER, UNITED METHODIST BIBLICAL SCHOLAR

THE FEAST OF TIMOTHY REES, WELSH ANGLICAN HYMN WRITER AND BISHOP OF LLANDAFF

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Frederick C. Grant, Robert M. Grant, and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Nautical Puns   Leave a comment

  1. I had fleeting concerns about ships.
  2. Do not bow to the demands of the stern ship captain.
  3. The inexpensive sailboat was on sail.
  4. A sailor off whom a funny seaman bounces off jokes is a strait man.
  5. A game played on a yacht is yahtzee.
  6. The soprano who took a cruise had no difficulty hitting the high seas.
  7. The two German u-boats that became one u-boat submerged.
  8. The submariner who read scripture aloud was glad the submarine had a pericope.

Feast of Will Herzfeld (June 9)   Leave a comment

Above:  Logo of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

Fair Use

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

WILLIAM LAWRENCE HERZFELD (JUNE 9, 1937-MAY 9, 2002)

U.S. Lutheran Ecumenist, Presiding Bishop of the Association of Evangelical Lutheran Churches, and Civil Rights Activist

+++++++++++++++++++

Will was a person with uncanny insight, constant respect for people, and a focus on the gospel.  He conveyed the partnership, accompaniment, of a large North American church with churches in other lands in a manner that transcended economic, cultural, and political boundaries.

–Bonnie L. Jansen, Executive Director, Division for Global Mission, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America; quoted in G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006), 408

+++++++++++++++++++

Bishop Will Herzfeld was a leader of U.S. Lutheranism.  He departed from one denomination, helped to form two denominations, and played a vital role in increasing the degree of unity of Lutheranism in the United States.  Activism in support of civil rights was a component of his faith.

Herzfeld grew up in the Jim Crow South.  He, born in Mobile, Alabama, on June 9, 1937, was a son of Julius Herzfeld, Sr., and Clarice Heinningburg Herzfeld.  Our saint grew up in The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod (LCMS)–in Faith Lutheran Church, Mobile, to be precise.  He attended parochial schools then other Lutheran institutions of education for African Americans.  Herzfeld graduated from the subpar Alabama Lutheran Academy and College (now Concordia College), Selma.  He carried negative memories of this institution for the rest of his life.  Our saint also graduated from Immanuel Lutheran College, Greensboro, North Carolina (1957).  Herzfeld went on to graduate from Immanuel Lutheran Seminary, Greensboro (M.Div., 1961), and to continue his studies at Concordia Theological Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri.  Meanwhile, he married Thressa M. Alston at Kannapolis, North Carolina, on June 11, 1961.  The couple had four children–two daughters and two sons–three of whom lived to adulthood.  Their first child, a daughter, lived only one day.

Herzfeld was an ordained minister in the LCMS from 1961 to 1976.  His first pastorate was Christ Lutheran Church, Tuscaloosa, Alabama (1961-1965).  Our saint became a leader in the Civil Rights Movement while in Tuscaloosa.  He helped to organize the Tuscaloosa chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) in 1963.  Herzfeld, the first president of that chapter, worked closely with Martin Luther King, Jr. (1939-1968).  OUr saint also served as the president of the Alabama branch of the SCLC (1964-1965).  On the denominational level, he was active in the Southern District of the LCMS.  Our saint sat on the Stewardship Committee and the Family Life Committee.  Furthermore, he was the Vice President of the Lutheran Human Relations Association of America (1964-1966).

Herzfeld ministered in the California-Nevada-Hawaii District of the LCMS, starting .  He, based in Oakland, California, was an urban minister for the district (1966-1969).  Our saint also served as the regional mission executive of the Lutheran Council in the U.S.A. (1969-1973).  This service overlapped with his time on the LCMS Board of Missions (1969-1973), the Council for Christian Medical Work (1973-1975), and the Board of Directors of the Wheat Ridge Foundation (now the We Raise Foundation) from 1069 to 1972.  The latter organization addresses social inequality.

Herzfeld ministered in the California-Nevada-Hawaii District of the LCMS, starting in 1966.  He, based in Oakland, California, was an urban minister for the district (1966-1969).  Our saint also served as the regional mission executive of the Lutheran Council in the U.S.A. (1969-1973).  This service overlapped with his time on the LCMS Board of Missions (1969-1973), the Council for Christian Medical Work (1973-1975), and the Board of Directors of the Wheat Ridge Foundation (now the We Raise Foundation) from 1969 to 1972.  (The We Raise Foundation addresses social inequality.)

Above:  Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Oakland, California

Image Source = Google Earth

Herzfeld was the pastor of Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Oakland, California, from 1973 to 1992.  These were eventful years for U.S. Lutheranism.  Our saint, who had represented LCMS President Jacob Preus at the seventy-fifth anniversary of the LCMS mission in India in 1969, broke with Preus during the doctrinal turmoil (1969-1976) in the denomination.  Herzfeld became the vice president of the moderate Evangelical Lutherans in Mission (ELIM) in 1973.  Three years later, he became the Vice President of the moderate, breakaway Association of Evangelical Lutheran Churches (AELC), to which ELIM gave birth.  The AELC eventually changed its title to Presiding Bishop.  Herzfeld became the Presiding Bishop in 1984.  By then he had been active for years in efforts to merge the AELC, the Lutheran Church in America (1962-1987), and The American Lutheran Church (1960-1987) into the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA).

Herzfeld was socially and politically active.  He taught urban ministry at the Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, Berkeley, California, starting in 1976.  He devoted much to ecumenical Black Theology-related projects and organizations for decades.  Our saint always seemed to find time for work in civil rights.  He worked for nuclear disarmament.  Herzfeld, active in urban renewal in Oakland, served in a variety of capacities toward that end.  He also found time to be the chaplain of the Golden State Warriors, a professional basketball team, from 1984 to 1991.

Herzfeld made history.  He made history in 1984, when he became the first African-American head of a U.S. Lutheran denomination.  He made history in the 1980s by being prominent in the movement to bring global pressure on the Apartheid-era governments of South Africa.  Our saint made history by helping to seal the deal to form the ELCA.

Meanwhile, Herzfeld continued his education.  He earned two doctorates–one from the Center for Urban Black Studies, the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, California; and the other one from Seminex.

Herzfeld resigned from Bethlehem Lutheran Church, Oakland, at the end of 1992 to accept promotion to the denominational level.  He moved to Chicago, Illinois, to become the Director for Global Community and Overseas Operations of the Division of Global Mission of the ELCA.  He, already a presence in global Lutheranism, expanded his worldwide profile.  He served as the Vice Presidency of Lutheran World Relief.  Our saint, a vice president of the National Council of Churches during his final years, was also active in the World Council of Churches and the Lutheran World Federation.  Herzfeld represented the ELCA globally in a variety of capacities and at a number of events.

In 2002, Herzfeld visited the Central African Republic.  He went there to attend the ordination of the first female Lutheran minister in that country.  Unfortunately, he also contracted cerebral malaria.  A month later, on May 9, our saint died at Resurrection Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.  Had Herzfeld lived one month longer, he would have celebrated his sixty-fifth birthday.

Survivors included Herzfeld’s former wife, Thressa; his three adult children–Martin, Katherine, and Stephen; and five grandchildren.  Our saint’s second wife, the Reverend Michele L. Robinson, had died in May 2001.

Herzfeld’s death prompted many remembrances and kind words.  Perhaps the most poignant statement came from a colleague, Herbert Chilstrom, the first Presiding Bishop of the ELCA. Chilstrom said,

I’ve lost a friend.

+++++++++++++++++++

God of justice, we praise you as we thank you for the

life, work, and legacy of your servant, Will Herzfeld.

May we, deriving inspiration from his example,

confront and resist systems of oppression and artificial inequality

as we strive to live according to the Golden Rule

and to leave society better than we found it.

May we also work to break down unnecessary barriers

to greater ecclesiastical unity and cooperation, for your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Amos 5:21-24

Psalm 95

Galatians 5:13-15

Matthew 25:31-46

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 28, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JAROSLAV VAJDA, U.S. LUTHERAN MINISTER, HYMN TRANSLATOR, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOZEF CEBULA, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR, 1941

THE FEAST OF SAINT PAMPHILIUS OF SULMONA, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP AND ALMSGIVER

THE FEAST OF SAINT PETER CHANEL, PROTOMARTYR OF OCEANIA, 1841

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM STRINGFELLOW, EPISCOPAL ATTORNEY, THEOLOGIAN, AND SOCIAL ACTIVIST

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Automotive Puns   2 comments

  1. A Norwegian car comes from the Fjord Motor Company.
  2. I never tire of using the idiom, “That’s when the rubber meets the road.”  Am I paving the way for a promising future as a punster?
  3. The bridge engineer with ADHD had an insufficient attention span.
  4. I never tire of saying, “That’s when the rubber meets the road.”  (Does that joke drive you crazy?)
  5. It is difficult to remain neutral regarding automobiles.
  6. Is a mechanic’s wardrobe his attire?  (I just had to get around to that joke.  And I pun where angels fear to tread.)