Archive for the ‘April 2’ Category

Feast of the Confession of St. Martha of Bethany (March 8-April 11)   Leave a comment

Above:  Icon of the Raising of Lazarus

Image in the Public Domain

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A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days is one of my hobbies, not a calendar of observances with any force or a popular following.  It does, however, constitute a forum to which to propose proper additions to church calendars.

Much of the Western Church observes January 18 as the Feast of the Confession of St. Peter the Apostle, the rock upon which Christ built the Church.  (Just think, O reader; I used to be a Protestant boy!  My Catholic tendencies must be inherent.)  The celebration of that feast is appropriate.  The Church does not neglect St. Martha of Bethany, either.  In The Episcopal Church, for example, she shares a feast with her sister (St. Mary) and her brother (St. Lazarus) on July 29.

There is no Feast of the Confession of St. Martha of Bethany, corresponding to the Petrine feast, however.  That constitutes an omission.  I correct that omission somewhat here at my Ecumenical Calendar as of today.  I hereby define the Sunday immediately prior to Palm/Passion Sunday as the Feast of the Confession of St. Martha of Bethany.  The reason for the temporal definition is the chronology inside the Gospel of John.

This post rests primarily on John 11:20-27, St. Martha’s confession of faith in her friend, Jesus, as

the Messiah, the Son of God, the one who is coming into the world.

The combination of grief, confidence, and faith is striking.  It is one with which many people identify.  It is one that has become increasingly relevant in my life during the last few months, as I have dealt with two deaths.

Faith frequently shines brightly in the spiritual darkness and exists alongside grief.  Faith enables people to cope with their grief and helps them to see the path through the darkness.  We need to grieve, but we also need to move forward.  We will not move forward alone, for God is with us.  If we are fortunate, so are other people, as well as at least one pet.

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Loving God, who became incarnate as Jesus of Nazareth

and enjoyed the friendship of Saints Mary, Martha, and Lazarus of Bethany:

We thank you for the faith of St. Martha, who understood that

you were the Messiah, the Son of God, the one who was coming into the world.

May we confess with our lips and our lives our faith in you,

the Incarnate, crucified, and resurrected Son of God, and draw others to you;

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Jeremiah 8:18-23

Psalm 142

1 Corinthians 15:12-28

John 11:1-44

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 18, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE CONFESSION OF SAINT PETER THE APOSTLE

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Feast of Carlo Carretto (April 2)   Leave a comment

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Above:  Carlo Carretto

Image in the Public Domain

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CARLO CARRETTO (APRIL 2, 1910-OCTOBER 4, 1988)

Spiritual Writer

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I feel immersed in God like a drop in the ocean, like a star in the immensity of night, like a lark in the summer sun or a fish in the sea.

–Carlo Carretto

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Carlo Carretto, born into a peasant family in northern Italy on April 2, 1910, eventually became a spiritual writer.  Initially he prepared to become a teacher, but politics prevented that; he was a member of the Fascist Party.  Our saint became involved in the youth wing of the Catholic Action movement instead.  That movement was consistent with his desire to advance the Catholic Church’s social and religious message.  This work occupied Carretto’s time for nearly 20 years.

In 1954 our saint answered God’s call (“Love everything and come with me into the desert.  It is not your acts and deeds that I want; I want your prayer, your love.”) to join the Little Brothers of Jesus, founded by Blessed Charles de Foucauld (1858-1916) in 1933.  Carretto arrived at El Abiodh, in Algeria, in December 1954.  There he remained for about a decade.  Time in the desert prepared Carretto to return to Europe in 1964.  He settled at Spello, Italy, the following year.  There he built an experimental faith community that involved lay people in prayer and reflection.

Carretto became a respected spiritual writer, especially for Love is for Living, Letters from the Desert, and I, Francis.  He was not, however, without ecclesiastical critics, due to his criticism of certain aspects (such as triumphalism and clericalism) of Roman Catholicism.  The challenge of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, our saint insisted, was to create an oasis of love in the desert in which one finds oneself.

Who knows what creating such an oasis of love might require to one to do?

Carretto died on October 4, 1988, aged 78 years.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 23, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS IGNATIUS OF ANTIOCH, POLYCARP OF SMYRNA, AND IRENAEUS OF LYONS, BISHOPS AND MARTYRS

THE FEAST OF SAINT ALEXANDER AKIMETES, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT

THE FEAST OF SAINT STEFAN WINCENTY FRELICHOWSKI, POLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR

THE FEAST OF SAINT WILLIGIS, ROMAN CATHOLIC ARCHBISHOP OF MAINZ; AND SAINT BERNWARD, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF HILDESHEIM

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Almighty God, we praise you for your servant Carlo Carretto,

through whom you have called the church to its tasks and renewed its life.

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your church and proclaim the reality of your reign,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Feast of Joseph Bernardin (April 2)   Leave a comment

#!dcdisplay fp\b0\i0\fs10Source~LOCAL/STAFF; Shoot_Date~20.10.1996; Type~COLOR; ÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐ fs12 <> fs10card 1 metro 10/20/96 cardinal joseph bernadin waces to well-wishers as he attends a 75th anniversary celebration at st. margaret mary church in chicago. cincinnati enquirer/michael e. keating mek fp\b0\i0\fs10ÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐÐ fp\i0\b\fs16Copyright 1996 The Cincinnati Enquirer fp\b0\i0\fs10Copyright=CINCINNATI_ENQUIRER; Person=BERNARDIN_JOSEPH; Aspect=LOCAL; Aspect=STAFF; Aspect=COLOR; Aspect=CINCINNATI_ENQUIRER; Aspect=BERNARDIN_JOSEPH;

Above:  Cardinal Bernardin

Fair Use Image

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JOSEPH LOUIS BERNARDIN (APRIL 2, 1928-NOVEMBER 14, 1996)

Cardinal Archbishop of Chicago

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It has been a great privilege to know a very great man.

–Retired Archbishop of Cape Town Desmond Tutu, 1996

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Joseph Bernardin was a famous and respected cleric.  Shortly before he died, he spoke with the President of the United States.  The Governor of Illinois and the Vice President of the United States attended his funeral Mass.  Bernardin had made quite an impression.

Bernardin rose from humble origins.  His parents were poor Italian immigrants; his father earned a modest income working in a quarry.  Our saint, born at Columbia, South Carolina, on April 2, 1928, grew up in  a predominantly Protestant culture of that state.  In 1946 his family was still so poor that his mother made the suit he wore to apply to study for the priesthood.  Bernardin studied theology at Baltimore and at the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.  Our saint, ordained to the priesthood in 1952, served as a priest in Charleston, South Carolina.  During 14 years he rose through the ranks in the diocese, serving in administrative posts.  In 1966, at the age of 38 years, Bernardin became the Auxiliary Bishop of Atlanta and the youngest bishop in the Roman Catholic Church in the United States.

Bernardin’s rise through the ranks continued.  From 1968 to 1972 he served as the General Secretary of the National Council of Catholic Bishops.  Subsequently he was the Archbishop of Cincinnati (1972-1982), the President of the National Council of Catholic Bishops (1974-1977), Archbishop of Chicago (1982-1996), and a member of the College of Cardinals (1983-1996).  Our saint took his faith into the public square.  He, among other actions, opposed President Nixon’s bombing campaign in Vietnam, articulated the theology of the Seamless Garment of Life, and worked on The Challenge of Peace, the National Council of Catholic Bishop’s 1983 pastoral letter declaring  nuclear war morally unjustifiable.

Bernardin had to endure public humiliation and suffering in the 1990s.  In 1993 Steven J. Cook sued Bernardin for sexual molestation that allegedly occurred 17 years prior.  The following year Cook dropped the lawsuit, citing unreliable memories.  Bernardin, who had always insisted upon his innocence, stated publicly that the matter had proven humiliating but that he harbored no ill feelings toward Cook, who stated that he wished the Cardinal the best.  The following year Bernardin received the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.  He followed the advice of Pope John Paul II:

Offer your suffering to the world.

Bernardin ministered to other cancer patients and made himself vulnerable to the public.  He died on November 14, 1996, aged 68 years.

Bernardin was certainly a man of God.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 12, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE SIXTH SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, YEAR A

THE FEAST OF ABSALOM JONES, RICHARD ALLEN, AND JARENA LEE, EVANGELISTS AND SOCIAL ACTIVISTS

THE FEAST OF CHARLES FREER ANDREWS, ANGLICAN PRIEST

THE FEAST OF CHRISTOPH CARL LUDWIG VON PFEIL, GERMAN LUTHERAN HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF MICHAEL WEISSE, GERMAN MORAVIAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER AND TRANSLATOR; AND JAN ROH, BOHEMIAN MORAVIAN BISHOP AND HYMN WRITER

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Almighty God, you have raised up faithful bishops of your church,

including your servant Joseph Cardinal Bernardin.

May the memory of his life be a source of joy for us and a bulwark of our faith,

so that we may serve and confess your name before the world,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3:14-21

John 21:15-17 or Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Feast of James Lloyd Breck (April 2)   3 comments

James Lloyd Breck

Above:  James Lloyd Breck

Image in the Public Domain

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JAMES LLOYD BRECK (JUNE 27, 1818-APRIL 2, 1876)

“The Apostle of the Wilderness”

James Lloyd Breck did more to expand the Church in  34 years than did most church members do in more time than that.

Breck was a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  The fourth of six children of George Breck (1785-1869) and Catherine Douce Israel Breck (1789-1864) attended the Flushing Institute, which William Augustus Muhlenberg (1796-1877) had founded.  At that school the sixteen-year-old Breck resolved to become a missionary.  Our saint continued his studies at the University of Pennsylvania (B.A., 1838), and the General Theological Seminary, New York (1838-1841).

Breck, a deacon when 1842 dawned, became a priest by the end of the year.  The newly-minted clergyman went west to Wisconsin, where he, with three former classmates from seminary, founded Nashotah House as a monastic community, missions headquarters, and seminary.

After a few years Breck left for a new mission field–Minnesota.  There he served as a military chaplain, founded congregations and schools, and started missionary work among the Ojibwa and the Chippewa, laying the foundations for the education of indigenous priests.  On August 11, 1855, Breck married Jane Maria Mills (1823-1862), a teacher among the Ojibwa.  They had two children–William Augustus Muhlenberg Breck (1856-1920), who became an Episcopal priest, and Charles Renwick Breck (born in 1858).  His congregation at Faribault, Minnesota, became the Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour, the first cathedral in The Episcopal Church.  At Faribault our saint founded Seabury Divinity Hall, now part of the Bexley-Seabury Federation.  In 1864 Breck married his second wife, Sarah E. Styles (1819-1877).

Breck’s final mission field was California, where he and a group of missionaries arrived in 1867.  Our saint settled in Benicia, founded five parishes, and established two schools.  He died at Benicia on April 2, 1876, after an illness about a week in duration.

Archive.org offers two biographies of Breck:

  1. The Life of James Lloyd Breck, D.D., Chiefly from Letters Written by Himself (1883), compiled by his older brother, Charles Breck, D.D. (1816-1891); and
  2. An Apostle of the Wilderness:  James Lloyd Breck, D.D., His Missions and His Schools (1903), by Theodore I. Holcombe.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

DECEMBER 17, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF MARY CORNELIA BISHOP GATES, U.S. DUTCH REFORMED HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF FRANK MASON NORTH, U.S. METHODIST MINISTER

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Teach your Church, O Lord, we pray, to value and support

pioneering and courageous missionaries, whom you call,

as you called your servant James Lloyd Breck,

to preach, and teach, and plant your Church on new frontiers;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Joshua 24:14-18

Psalm 145:1-7

1 Corinthians 3:4-11

Mark 4:26-32

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 303

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Feast of Sts. John Payne and Cuthbert Mayne (April 2)   Leave a comment

Above:  Flag of England

SAINT JOHN PAYNE, A.K.A. JOHN PAINE (1532-1582)

Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr

His feast = April 2

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SAINT CUTHBERT MAYNE (1544-1577)

Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr

His feast transferred from November 25

Religious toleration, I am convinced, is a great civic virtue.  Unfortunately, throughout much of history, it has been a rare one.  And its scarcity has made martyrs.  Today I write about two of them.

St. John Payne/Paine was born at Petersborough, England, in 1532.  Sources indicate that he might have converted to Roman Catholicism.  He was, past a certain point in his life, anyway, a Roman Catholic.  Payne studied for the priesthood at Douai, France, in 1574-1576, becoming a priest and beginning his English mission in 1576.  For a year the saint worked successfully as an undercover priest in England.  One of his notable accomplishments was reconverting George Godsalf, a former Roman Catholic deacon, back to Catholicism.  Godsalf then studied for the priesthood at Douai, became a priest in 1577, and rejoined Payne, being arrested with him in 1581.

These priests found shelter with Lady Anne Petre, an elderly (born 1509) widow and a devout Catholic.  Her late husband had been a high-ranking aide to Tudor monarchs.  Furthermore, her father had been Lord Mayor of London.  She took a great risk aiding these priests, who were technically traitors, according to the law.  Payne went to his gruesome death on April2, 1582.  Lady Anne died later that month, perhaps of the shock of what had happened to Payne.  And Godsalf remained in prison until 1585, when authorities banished him.  He died in Paris in 1592.

St. John Payne began his English mission with St. Cuthbert Mayne.  Born at Youlston, Devonshire, England, in 1544, Mayne’s uncle, an Anglican priest, raised him.  Then he met St. Edmund Campion, who influenced him to convert to Roman Catholicism.  Mayne began his studies at Douai in 1573, became a Catholic priest in 1575, and began his English mission the next year.  He found shelter with Francis Tregian the Elder (1548-1608), who took a great risk.  Payne was officially Tregian’s estate steward, but worked undercover as a priest.  Authorities arrested Mayne and Tregian in 1577.  Declared a traitor, Mayne met his gruesome demise on November 25, 1577, becoming the first Englishman trained for the Catholic priesthood to die as a martyr after the final break with Rome.  Tregian spent twenty-eight years in prison until King James I pardoned him.  Then the protector moved to Madrid, where King Philip III of Spain granted him a pension.  Tregian died at the Jesuit hospice in Lisbon in 1608.

Although Payne and Mayne would have argued with me in a counterfactual reality where we would have been contemporaries, I honor them.  What they did, they did for Jesus.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 24, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE ORDINATION OF FLORENCE LI-TIM-OI, ANGLICAN PRIEST

THE FEAST OF SAINT FRANCIS DE SALES, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF GENEVA

THE FEAST OF THURGOOD MARSHALL, ATTORNEY AND JURIST

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM BARCLAY, SCOTTISH PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Almighty God,

you gave your servants

Saints John Payne and Cuthbert Mayne

courage to confess Jesus Christ

and to die for this faith;

may we always be ready

to give a reason for the hope that is in us

and to suffer gladly for Christ’s sake.  Amen.

Wisdom of Solomon 3:1-9

Revelation 12:10-12

John 15:18-21

A New Zealand Prayer Book (1989), pages 680-681

Feast of St. Sidonius Apollinaris, St. Eucherius of Lyon, and His Descendants (April 2)   2 comments

Above:  Western Europe in 395 Common Era

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SAINT SIDONIUS APOLLINARIS (CIRCA 430-CIRCA 489)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Auvergne

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SAINT EUCHERIUS OF LYON (CIRCA 380-CIRCA 449)

Roman Catholic Archbishop of Lyon

His feast transferred from November 16

Great-grandfather of 

SAINT VIVENTIOLUS OF LYON (460-524)

Roman Catholic Archbishop of Lyon

His feast transferred from July 12

Brother of

SAINT RUSTICUS OF LYON (CIRCA 455-501)

Roman Catholic Archbishop of Lyon

His feast transferred from April 25

Father of

SAINT SARCEDOS OF LYON (487-551)

Roman Catholic Archbishop of Lyon

His feast transferred from September 12

Son of

SAINT AURELIANUS OF ARLES (523-551)

Roman Catholic Archbishop of Arles

His feast transferred from June 16

Cousin of

SAINT NICETIUS OF LYON (513-573)

Roman Catholic Archbishop of Lyon

His feast day = April 2

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Sometimes writing hagiographies is a straight-forward matter.  Facts are well-documented, the contexts are clear, and no (if any) rabbit trails branch off from one person’s life.  Then we have circumstances such as the one which led to this post.  I found a name, St. Nicetius of Lyon, in a book of saints.  My subsequent research led me to seven other saints, information about six of whom I consider trustworthy.  The story of one life has become an intergenerational saga, which I have spent hours untangling.  I will try to tell the tale well; follow it with me.

Our saga begins in the twilight of the Western Roman Empire and continues until 573, when the Merovingian kings governed Gaul, which they called Francia.  The collapse of the old order and the use of the new one can be disorientating.  That, however, was the context for our characters.  Shall we start.

We begin in Gaul, in the late 330s.  One Apollinaris (I) served as Prefect of Gaul at that time.  His son, Apollinaris (II), filled the same office prior to 409.  Decimus Rusticus succeeded his friend as Prefect, serving from 409/410 to 413.  Unfortunately for Decimus Rusticus, known to be a good man and a faithful Christian, he died at the hands of forces sent by the Western Roman Emperor Honorius (reigned 384-423).  Then Apollinaris (III), son of Apollinaris (II), served as Prefect from 423 to 428.

The son of Apollinaris (III) was St. Sidonius Apollinaris (circa 430-circa 489).  Born at Lugdunum (now Lyon), in Gaul (now France), St. Sidonius served as Prefect of Gaul during the reign of Emperor Valentinian III (in office 425-455). The saint married Paplianilla, daughter of the future Emperor Avitus (reigned 455-456), who was of Gallic origin.  The couple had at least three children, including a son named Apollinaris (IV).  The reign of Avitus was a difficult one; a military revolt ended it.  The former Emperor, trying to flee to Gaul, got only as far as the city of Placentia, where the imperial authorities permitted him to become bishop there in October 456.  Yet, upon learning that the Senate wanted him dead, Avitus fled toward Gaul via the Alps.  He died of either plague or murder.

The political situation had changed for St. Sidonius Apollinaris.  Being the son-in-law of a recently deposed and perhaps murdered emperor did not bode well for the future.  Majorian (reigned 457-461), successor of Avitus and an active participant in the coup, captured Lyon, where the saint lived.  The new emperor looked favorably upon the saint’s vast knowledge, however, and treated him respectfully.  The saint, promoted to the position of count, spoke highly of Majorian.  The saint’s star continued to rise under Emperor Anthemius (reigned 467-472), who made him a Senator.  Then, in 472, the saint assumed his final post, Bishop of Auvergne, now Clermont.

The Western Roman Empire ceased to exist in 476.  This was a formality, for the empire had long existed on paper than on the ground.  Difficult times called for strong leadership, and the Church was the one unifying structure in Western Europe for centuries.  There the saint made his final contribution.  Of him St. Gregory of Tours wrote highly.  St. Gregory was impressed with the intelligence, oratory, and memory of St. Sidonius Apollinaris, who could speak at length and intelligently without preparation.  And, St. Gregory wrote, St. Sidonius could (and did) celebrate the Mass from memory.

St. Sidonius Apollinaris had a classmate and good friend, Aquilianus (circa 430-circa 470), a Gallic nobleman.  Aquillianus was the paternal grandson of Decimus Rusticus.  And Aquilianus served as Vicarius, or deputy, under the Prefect of Gaul, St. Sidonius.  Aquilianus was also the great-grandson of St. Eucherius of Lyon.

St. Eucherius of Lyon (circa 380-circa 449), husband of Gallia, mourned his wife after she died in 390.  He and his two sons, Salonius (later Bishop of Geneva) and Veranius, retreated to monastic life at Lerins.  There they lived austerely and devoted themselves to learning.  St. Eucherius even consulted St. John Cassian regarding holiness and austerity of living.  The reputation of St. Eucherius spread, causing him to become Archbishop of Lyons in 434.  Veranius, one of his sons, succeeded him in the post.

Above:  Gaul in 481

Aquilianus (circa 430-circa 470), great-grandson of St. Eucherius, had at least two sons.  One was St. Viventiolus (460-524), who had become Archbishop of Lyon by 514.  The other son was St. Rusticus (circa 455-501), who preceded his brother as Archbishop of Lyon, serving from 494 to 501.  St. Rusticus was son-in-law of Ruricus I (circa 440-circa 510), Bishop of Limoges from circa 485 to 510.  A son, Leontius, succeeded St. Rusticus as Archbishop of Lyon.  And a grandson of St. Rusticus, Gondulf of Provence, served as Bishop of Metz, starting in 591.

St. Rusticus, sources tell me, succeeded St. Lupicinus of Lyon, who presided over that see from 491 to 494.  I can find little reliable information about this saint, a contemporary of a second St. Lupicinus.  Information about them seems to have become confused.  So I move along.

Above:  Gaul in 511

St. Rusticus had a son, St. Sarcedos (487-551).  The son, also an Archbishop of Lyon, served from 544 to 551.  St. Sarcedos presided over the Fifth Council of Orleans (549).  Some notable acts of that Council included the following:

  1. Censuring all who tried to take back into servitude those whom the church had emancipated;
  2. Placing lepers under the protection of bishops; and
  3. Threatening with excommunication anyone who embezzled royally-donated funds intended for a hospital at Lyon.

The royal donor of those funds was Childebert I (reigned 511-558), the Merovingian King of Paris, whom St. Sarcedos advised.  St. Sarcedos was also the father of St. Aurelianus (523-551), Archbishop of Arles from 546 to 551.

Succeeding St. Sarcedos as Archbishop of Lyon was his nephew, St. Nicetius (513-573).  The saint, ordained priest by Agricola, Bishop of Charlons-sur-Mame, revived chanting in the churches of his see.

Details of the lives of many pre-Congregation Roman Catholic saints are sketchy, for a host of sources are lost to us.  What survives mostly are reputations for holiness and a few facts and stories.  If memory of any of us survives, may they be positive and holy ones.  May succeeding generations look back upon us and say that we kept the faith and passed it down through the family tree.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 15, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE SECOND SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, YEAR B

THE FEAST OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., NATIONAL BAPTIST PASTOR

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Good and gracious God,

the light of the faithful and shepherd of souls,

you set your servants

Saint Sidonius Apollinaris,

Saint Eucherius of Lyon,

Saint Viventiolus of Lyon,

Saint Rusticus of Lyon

Saint Sarcedos of Lyon,

Saint Aurelianus of Lyon, and

Saint Nicetius of Lyon

to be bishops in your Church

to feed your sheep with your word

and to guide them by their example;

give us grace to keep the faith they taught

and to follow in their footsteps.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 15 or 99

Acts 20:28-35

Matthew 24:42-47

A New Zealand Prayer Book (1989), pages 681-682

Saints’ Days and Holy Days for April   Leave a comment

Daisies

Image Source = WiZZiK

THIS IS THE RESET VERSION, PENDING FURTHER REVISION.

1 (Frederick Denison Maurice, Anglican Priest and Theologian)

  • Giuseppe Girotti, Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr
  • Ludovico Pavoni, Roman Catholic Priest and Educator
  • Syragius of Autun and Anarcharius of Auxerre, Roman Catholic Bishops, and Valery of Leucone and Eustace of Luxeuit, Roman Catholic Abbots

2 (James Lloyd Breck, “The Apostle of the Wilderness”)

  • Carlo Carretto, Spiritual Writer
  • John Payne and Cuthbert Mayne, Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs, 1582 and 1577
  • Joseph Bernardin, Cardinal Archbishop of Chicago
  • Sidonius Apollinaris, Eustace of Lyon, and His Descendants, Roman Catholic Bishops

3 (Luther D. Reed, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Liturgist)

  • Burgendofara and Sadalberga, Roman Catholic Abbesses, and Their Relatives
  • Marc Sangnier, Founder of the Sillon Movement
  • Reginald Heber, Anglican Bishop of Calcutta and Hymn Writer

4 (Benedict the African, Franciscan Friar and Hermit)

  • Ernest W. Shurtleff, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Martin Luther King, Jr., U.S. Civil Rights Leader, and Martyr, 1968 (also January 15)

5 (André, Magda, and Daniel Trocmé, Righteous Gentiles)

  • Mariano de la Mata Aparicio, Roman Catholic Missionary and Educator in Brazil
  • Pauline Sperry, Mathematician, Philanthropist, and Activist; and her brother, Willard Learoyd Sperry, Congregationalist Minister, Ethicist, Theologian, and Dean of Harvard Law School
  • William Derham, Anglican Priest and Scientist

6 (Marcellinus of Carthage, Roman Catholic Martyr, 413)

  • Benjamin Hall Kennedy, Greek and Latin Scholar, Bible Translator, and Anglican Priest
  • Emil Brunner, Swiss Reformed Theologian
  • Milner Ball, Presbyterian Minister, Law Professor, Witness for Civil Rights, Humanitarian
  • Nokter Balbulus, Roman Catholic Monk

7 (Tikhon of Moscow, Russian Orthodox Patriach)

  • George the Younger, Greek Orthodox Bishop of Mitylene
  • Jay Thomas Stocking, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Montford Scott, Edmund Gennings, Henry Walpole, and Their Fellow Martyrs, 1591 and 1595
  • Randall Davidson, Archbishop of Canterbury

8 (Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, Patriarch of American Lutheranism; his great-grandson, William Augustus Muhlenberg, Episcopal Priest, Hymn Writer, and Liturgical Pioneer; and his colleague, Anne Ayres, Foundress of the Sisterhood of the Holy Communion)

  • Dionysius of Corinth, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • Hugh of Rouen, Roman Catholic Bishop, Abbot, and Monk
  • Julie Billiart, Founder of the Congregation of the Sisters of Notre Dame
  • Randall Davidson, Archbishop of Canterbury

9 (Dietrich Bonhoeffer, German Lutheran Martyr

  • Johann Cruger, German Lutheran Organist, Composer, and Hymnal Editor
  • John Samuel Bewley Monsell, Anglican Priest and Poet; and Richard Mant, Anglican Bishop of Down, Connor, and Dromore
  • Lydia Emilie Gruchy, First Female Minister in the United Church of Canada
  • Mikael Agricola, Finnish Lutheran Liturgist, Bishop of Turku, and “Father of Finnish Literary Language”

10 (Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, Roman Catholic Priest, Scientist, and Theologian)

  • Fulbert of Chartres, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • Henry Van Dyke, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Liturgist
  • Howard Thurman, Protestant Theologian

11 (Heinrich Theobald Schenck, German Lutheran Pastor and Hymn Writer)

  • Charles Stedman Newhall, U.S. Naturalist, Hymn Writer, and Congregationalist and Presbyterian Minister
  • Henry Hallam Tweedy, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer

12 (Henry Sloane Coffin, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Theologian, and Hymn Translator; and his nephew, William Sloane Coffin, Jr., U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Social Activist)

  • David Uribe-Velasco, Mexican Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1927
  • Zeno of Verona, Bishop

13 (Joseph Barber Lightfoot, Bishop of Durham)

  • Henri Perrin, French Roman Catholic Worker Priest
  • Rolando Rivi, Roman Catholic Seminarian and Martyr

14 (Edward Thomas Demby and Henry Beard Delany, Episcopal Suffragan Bishops for Colored Work)

  • Anthony, John, and Eustathius of Vilnius, Martyrs in Lithuania, 1347
  • George Frederick Handel, Composer
  • Wandregisilus of Normandy, Roman Catholic Abbot, and Lambert of Lyons, Roman Catholic Abbot and Bishop

15 (Olga of Kiev, Regent of Kievan Russia; Adalbert of Magdeburg, Roman Catholic Bishop; Adalbert of Prague, Roman Catholic Bishop and Martyr, 997; and Benedict and Gaudentius of Pomerania, Roman Catholic Martyrs, 997)

  • Damien and Marianne of Molokai, Workers Among Lepers
  • Flavia Domitilla, Roman Christian Noblewoman; and Maro, Eutyches, and Victorinus of Rome, Priests and Martyrs Circa 99

16 (Bernadette of Lourdes, Visionary)

  • Calvin Weiss Laufer, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymnodist
  • Isabella Gilmore, Anglican Deaconess

17 (Daniel Sylvester Tuttle, Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church)

  • Emily Cooper, Episcopal Deaconess
  • Lucy Larcom, U.S. Academic, Journalist, Poet, Editor, and Hymn Writer
  • Max Josef Metzger, Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1944
  • Wilbur Kenneth Howard, Moderator of The United Church of Canada

18  (Roger Williams, Founder of Rhode Island; and Anne Hutchinson, Rebellious Puritan)

  • Cornelia Connelly, Foundress of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus
  • Maria Anna Blondin, Foundress of the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Anne
  • Murin of Fahan, Laserian of Leighlin, Goban of Picardie, Foillan of Fosses, and Ultan of Peronne, Abbots; Fursey of Peronne and Blitharius of Seganne, Monks
  • Roman Archutowski, Polish Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1943

19 (Alphege, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Martyr, 1012)

  • Emma of Lesum, Benefactor
  • Olavus Petri, Swedish Lutheran Theologian, Historian, Liturgist, Minister, Hymn Writer, Hymn Translator, and “Father of Swedish Literature;” and his brother, Laurentius Petri, Swedish Lutheran Archbishop of Uppsala, Bible Translator, and “Father of Swedish Hymnody”

20 (Johannes Bugenhagen, German Lutheran Theologian, Minister, Liturgist, and “Pastor of the Reformation”)

  • Amator of Auxerre and Germanus of Auxerre, Roman Catholic Bishops; Mamertinus of Auxerre, Roman Catholic Abbot; and Marcian of Auxerre, Roman Catholic Monk
  • Christian X, King of Denmark and Iceland; and his brother, Haakon VII, King of Norway
  • Marion MacDonald Kelleran, Episcopal Seminary Professor and Lay Leader

21 (Roman Adame Rosales, Mexican Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1927)

  • Conrad of Parzham, Capuchin Friar
  • Simeon Barsabae, Bishop, and His Companions, Martyrs, 341

22 (Gene Britton, Episcopal Priest)

  • Donald S. Armentrout, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Scholar
  • Kathe Kollwitz, German Lutheran Artist and Pacifist
  • Vitalis of Gaza, Monk, Hermit, and Martyr, Circa 625

23 (Toyohiko Kagawa, Renewer of Society and Prophetic Witness in Japan)

  • Walter Russell Bowie, Episcopal Priest, Seminary Professor, and Hymn Writer

24 (Genocide Remembrance)

  • Egbert of Lindisfarne, Roman Catholic Monk, and Adalbert of Egmont, Roman Catholic Missionary
  • Fidelis of Sigmaringen, Capuchin Friar and Martyr, 1622
  • Johann Walter, “First Cantor of the Lutheran Church”
  • Mellitus, Bishop of London and Archbishop of Canterbury

25 (MARK THE EVANGELIST, MARTYR, 68)

26 (William Cowper, Anglican Hymn Writer)

  • Robert Hunt, First Anglican Chaplain at Jamestown, Virginia

27 (George Washington Doane, Episcopal Bishop of New Jersey; and his son, William Croswell Doane, Episcopal Bishop of Albany; Hymn Writers)

  • Antony and Theodosius of Kiev, Founders of Russian Orthodox Monasticism; Barlaam of Kiev, Russian Orthodox Abbot; and Stephen of Kiev, Russian Orthodox Abbot and Bishop
  • Christina Rossetti, Poet and Religious Writer
  • Remaclus of Maastricht, Theodore of Maastricht, Lambert of Maastricht, Hubert of Maastricht and Liege, and Floribert of Liege, Roman Catholic Bishops; Landrada of Munsterbilsen, Roman Catholic Abbess; and Otger of Utrecht, Plechelm of Guelderland, and Wiro, Roman Catholic Missionaries

28 (Jaroslav Vajda, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Hymn Translator, and Hymn Writer)

  • Jozef Cebula, Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1941
  • Pamphilius of Sulmona, Roman Catholic Bishop and Almsgiver
  • Peter Chanel, Protomartyr of Oceania, 1841

29 (Catherine of Siena, Roman Catholic Mystic and Religious)

  • Bosa of York, John of Beverley, Wilfrid the Younger, and Acca of Hexham, Roman Catholic Bishops
  • James Edward Walsh, Roman Catholic Missionary Bishop and Political Prisoner in China
  • Timothy Rees, Welsh Anglican Hymn Writer and Bishop of Llandaff

30 (James Montgomery, Anglican and Moravian Hymn Writer)

  • James Russell Woodford, Anglican Bishop of Ely, Hymn Translator, and Hymn Writer
  • John Ross MacDuff and George Matheson, Scottish Presbyterian Ministers and Authors
  • Sarah Josepha Buell Hale, Poet, Author, Editor, and Prophetic Witness

 

Floating

  • The Confession of Saint Martha of Bethany (the Sunday immediately prior to Palm Sunday; March 8-April 11)

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.