Archive for the ‘December 2’ Category

Holiday Busyness   2 comments

Above:  A Domestic Scene, December 8, 2018

Photographer = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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On my bed when I think of you,

I muse on you in the watches of the night,

for you have always been my help;

in the shadow of your wings I rejoice;

my heart clings to you,

your right hand supports me.

–Psalm 63:6-8, The New Jerusalem Bible (1985)

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In my U.S. culture, the time from Thanksgiving (late November) to New Year’s Day is quite busy.  Holidays populate the calendar.  Some of these holidays are, for lack of a better word, ecumenical.  Others are religiously and/or culturally specific, though.  Christmas, originally the Christ Mass, has become an occasion, for many, to worship the Almighty Dollar at the high altar of commercialism.  This is how many Evangelicals of the Victorian Era wanted matters to be.

On the relatively innocuous side, this is the time of the year to populate one’s calendar with holiday social events, such as parties, school plays, and seasonal concerts.  Parents often like to attend their children’s events, appropriately.  Holiday concerts by choral and/or instrumental ensembles can also be quite pleasant.

Yet, amid all this busyness (sometimes distinct from business), are we neglecting the innate human need for peace and quiet?  I like classical Advent and Christmas music, especially at this time of the year (all the way through January 5, the twelfth day of Christmas), but I have to turn it off eventually.  Silence also appeals to me.  Furthermore, being busy accomplishing a worthy goal is rewarding, but so is simply being.

The real question is one of balance.  Given the absence of an actual distinction between the spiritual and the physical, everything is spiritual.  If we are too busy for God, silence, and proper inactivity, we are too busy.  If we are too busy to listen to God, we are too busy.  If we are too busy or too idle, we are not our best selves.

May we, by grace, strike and maintain the proper balance.  May we, especially at peak periods of activity, such as the end of the year, not overextend ourselves, especially in time commitments.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

DECEMBER 14, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE THIRTEENTH DAY OF ADVENT, YEAR C

THE FEAST OF SAINT VENANTIUS HONORIUS CLEMENTIUS FORTUNATUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF POITIERS

THE FEAST OF DOROTHY ANN THRUPP, ENGLISH HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN OF THE CROSS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MYSTIC

THE FEAST OF ROBERT MCDONALD, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND MISSIONARY

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Published originally at BLOGA THEOLOGICA

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Feast of Channing Moore Williams (December 2)   Leave a comment

channing-moore-williams

Above:  Bishop Channing Moore Williams

Image in the Public Domain

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CHANNING MOORE WILLIAMS (JULY 18, 1829-DECEMBER 2, 1910)

Episcopal Missionary Bishop in China and Japan

Channing Moore Williams helped to build up the church in China and Japan.  This work filled 53 of his 81 years.

Williams, one of six children, entered the world at Richmond, Virginia, on July 18, 1829.  His family was active in The Episcopal Church.  His father was John Green Williams.  Our saint’s mother was Mary Anne Crignan Williams, widowed in 1832.  Young Channing, at the age of 18 years, moved to Henderson, Kentucky, to work in a cousin’s general store.  There he also studied informally.  Williams, confirmed in 1849, attended the College of William and Mary (M.A., 1852) then the Virginia Theological Seminary, Alexandria, Virginia, from which he graduated in 1855.

Williams acted on his interest in foreign missions.  He, ordained to the diaconate on July 1, 1855, sailed to Shanghai in November of that year.  Ordination to the priesthood followed on January 1, 1857.  Our saint and John Liggins (1829-1912), former classmates at seminary, left China to become the first two Episcopal missionaries in Japan, arriving at Nagasaki on July 1, 1859.  Ill health forced Liggins to return to the United States the following year, but Williams remained until 1866.  On October 3 of that year he became the second Bishop of Shanghai, with responsibility for the Episcopal missionary work in China and Japan.  For eight years our saint divided his time between the two countries.  Finally, on October 23, 1874, he became responsible for work in Japan alone.  His new title was Missionary Bishop of Yedo.  (The Missionary District of Yedo was Japan.)  Williams, who was fluent in Japanese, founded churches and schools and converted many Japanese people to Christianity.  In 1887 he oversaw the merger of the Japanese missions of The Episcopal Church and The Church of England to form Nippon Sei Ko Kai, or the Holy Catholic Church of Japan, also known as the Anglican Episcopal Church in Japan.  He served as its first bishop.  In 1889 Williams, citing health concerns, asked for the appointment of his successor, who arrived four years later.  Our saint relocated to Kyoto, where he evangelized until 1908.

Williams returned to the United States in 1908.  He died at Richmond on December 2, 1910.  He was 81 years old.

Nippon Sei Ko Kai, founded with fewer than 1000 members, had grown to encompass about 57,000 souls in 315 congregations, organized into 11 dioceses, in 2005.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 19, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS THOMAS JOHNSON, JOHN DAVY, AND THEIR COMPANIONS

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM CHALMERS SMITH, SCOTTISH PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

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Almighty and everlasting God, we thank you for your servant Channing Moore Williams,

whom you called to preach to the people of China and Japan.

Raise up in this and every land evangelists and heralds of your kingdom,

that your Church may proclaim the unsearchable riches of our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Isaiah 49:22-23

Psalm 96:1-7

Acts 1:1-9

Luke 10:1-9

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 97

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Feast of Gerald Thomas Noel, Baptist Wriothesley Noel, and Caroline Maria Noel (December 2)   2 comments

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Above:  Winchester Cathedral, Between 1890 and 1900

Published by Detroit Publishing Company, 1905

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-09011

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GERALD THOMAS NOEL (DECEMBER 2, 1782-FEBRUARY 24, 1851)

Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

brother of

BAPTIST WRIOTHESLEY NOEL (JULY 16, 1798-JANUARY 19, 1873)

Anglican Priest, English Baptist Evangelist, and Hymn Writer

uncle of

CAROLINE MARIA NOEL (JULY 10, 1817-DECEMBER 7, 1877)

Anglican Hymn Writer

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One name–that of Caroline Maria Noel–led me to two more–those of her father and her uncle.  It is good to write about saints in the context of family, for families should foster righteousness.

Charles Noel Noel (1781-1866) was the first Earl of Gainsborough.  The title “Earl of Gainsborough” passed down through his lineage.

This post is about three of his relatives, however.

Gerald Thomas Noel (1782-1851), educated at Edinburgh and Cambridge, took Anglican Holy Orders.  He served as the Curate of Radwell then the Vicar of Rainham and Romsey then Canon of Winchester Cathedral.  He wrote hymns and books.  His books were:

  • A Selection of Psalms from the New Version of the Church of England and Others; Corrected and Revised for Public Worship (1810);
  • Arvendel, or Sketches in Italy and Switzerland (1813);
  • Fifty Sermons for the Use of Families (1830); and
  • Sermons Preached in Romsey (1853).

One of his hymns follows:

If human kindness meets return,

And owns the grateful tie;

If tender thoughts within us burn,

To feel a friend is nigh;–

O shall not warmer accents tell

The gratitude we owe

To Him who died, our fears to quell,

Our more than orphan’s woe!

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While yet his anguished soul surveyed

Those pangs he would not flee,

What love his latest words displayed,–

“Meet and remember me!”

Remember thee!  thy death, thy shame

Our sinful hearts to share!

O memory, leave no other name

But his recorded there!

And here is another:

When musing sorrow weeps the past,

And mourns the present pain,

‘Tis sweet to think of peace at last,

And feel that death is gain.

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‘Tis not that murmuring thoughts arise,

And dread a Father’s will;

‘Tis not that meek submission flies,

And would not suffer still:

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It is that heaven-born faith surveys

The path that leads to light,

And longs her eagle plumes to raise,

And lose herself in sight:

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It is that hope with ardor glows,

To see Him face to face,

Whose dying love no language knows

Sufficient to trace.

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O let me wing my hallowed flight

From earth born woe and care,

And soar above these clouds of night,

My Saviour’s bliss to share!

His grave is at the Abbey Church of Romsey.

Gerald had another brother, Baptist Wriothesley Noel (1798-1873), born at Leighmont, Scotland.  The 1821 Cambridge graduate took Anglican Holy Orders.  In 1827 he began to serve at St. John’s Chapel, Bedford Row, London, where he established a reputation for evangelical preaching.  In 1846, while at St. John’s Chapel, he helped to found the Evangelical Alliance (http://www.eauk.org/).  Two years later he converted to the Baptists, serving as a minister of John Street Chapel, London, from 1849 to 1868 and serving two terms as the leader of the Baptist Union.  Baptist Noel was also an active philanthropist in London and an ardent abolitionist who supported the federal side in the U.S. Civil War (1861-1865).

Baptist Noel’s writings included the following:

  • Essay on the Union of Church and State (1848);
  • Essay on Christian Baptism (1849); and
  • Freedom and Slavery in the United States of America (1863).

One of his hymns follows:

There’s not a bird with lonely nest,

In pathless wood or mountain crest,

Nor meaner thing, which does not share,

O God, in Thy pastoral care.

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Each banner crag, each desert rude,

Holds Thee within its solitude;

And Thou dost bless the wand’rer there,

Who makes his solitary prayer.

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In busy mart and crowded street,

No less than in the still retreat,

Thou, Lord, art near, our souls to bless

With all a parent’s tenderness.

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And we, where’er our lot is cast,

While life, and thought, and feeling last,

Through all the years in every place,

Will bless Thee for Thy boundless grace.

He died at Stanmere, Middlesex, England.

Finally we arrive at the saint of whom I intended to write all along.

Caroline Maria Noel (1817-1877), daughter of Gerald and niece of Baptist and Charles, was born in Kent.  She wrote her first hymn at the tender age of seventeen years.  Between ages of twenty and forty, however, she wrote no hymns.  Caroline resumed writing hymns after that, however.  The last twenty-five years of her life were filled with increasingly severe illnesses.  In this context she wrote primarily to assure others that there was divine comfort for those who suffer.  Her hymns, intended mostly for private meditations, appeared in two volumes:

  • The Name of Jesus, and Other Verses for the Sick and Lonely (1861); and
  • The Name of Jesus, and Other Poems (1878).

Perhaps her most famous hymn is “At the Name of Jesus,” a processional hymn for the Feast of the Ascension from 1870:

At the name of Jesus,

Ev’ry knee shall bow,

Ev’ry tongue confess him

King of glory now.

‘Tis the Father’s pleasure

We should call him Lord,

Who from the beginning

Was the mighty Word.

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At his voice creation

Sprang at once to sight,

All the angel faces,

All the hosts of light,

Thrones and dominations,

Stars upon their way,

All the heavenly orders

In their vast array.

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Humbled for a season,

To receive a name

From the lips of sinners

Unto whom he came,

Faithfully he bore it,

Spotless to the last,

Brought it back victorious

When from death he passed;

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Bore it up triumphant

With its human light,

Through the ranks of creatures

To the central height,

To the throne of Godhead,

To the Father’s breast,

Filled it with the glory

Of that perfect rest.

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In your hearts enthrone him;

There let him subdue

All that is not holy,

All that is not true:

Crown him as your captain

In temptation’s hour;

Let his will enfold you

In its light and pow’r.

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Christians, this Lord Jesus

Shall return again

In his Father’s glory

With his angel train;

For all wreaths of empire

Meet upon his brow,

And our hearts confess him

King of glory now.

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Glory then to Jesus,

Who, the Prince of light,

To a world in darkness

Brought the gift of sight;

Praise to God the Father;

In the Spirit’s love

Praise we all together

Him who reigns above.

Caroline’s grave is next to that of her father at Romsey.

I invite you, O reader, to join me in honoring the legacies of these saints.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 25, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE INAUGURATION OF THE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST, 1957

THE FEAST OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON, POET AND NOVELIST

THE FEAST OF SAINT WILLIAM OF VERCELLI, ROMAN CATHOLIC HERMIT; AND SAINT JOHN OF MATERA, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Gerald Thomas Noel, Baptist Wriothesley Noel, Caroline Maria Noel,

and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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First Sunday of Advent, Year C   Leave a comment

Above:  An Ocean Storm

Image Source = Mila Zinkova

Blameless in the Sight of Our Lord and Father

DECEMBER 2, 2018

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Jeremiah 33:14-16 (New Revised Standard Version):

The days are surely coming,

says the LORD,

when I will fulfill the promise I made to the house of Israel and the house of Judah.  In those days and at that time I will cause a righteous branch to spring up for David; and he shall execute justice and righteousness in the land.  In those days Judah will be saved and Jerusalem will dwell in safety.  And this is the name by which it will be called:  ”The LORD is our righteousness.”

Psalm 25:1-9 (1979 Book of Common Prayer):

1  To you, O LORD, I lift up my soul;

my God, I put my trust in you;

let me not be humiliated,

nor let my enemies triumph over me.

2  Let none who look to you be put to shame;

let the treacherous be disappointed in their schemes.

3  Show me your ways, O LORD,

and teach me your paths.

4  Lead me in your truth and teach me,

for you are the God of my salvation;

in you have I trusted all the day long.

5  Remember, O LORD, your compassion and love,

for they are from everlasting.

6  Remember not the sins of my youth and my transgressions;

remember me according to your love

and for the sake of your goodness, O LORD.

7  Gracious and upright is the LORD;

therefore he teaches sinners in his way.

8  He guides the humble in doing right

and teaches his way to the lowly.

9  All the paths of the LORD are love and faithfulness

to those who keep his covenant and his testimonies.

1 Thessalonians 3:9-13 (New Jerusalem Bible):

How can we thank God enough for you, for all the joy we feel before our God on your account?  We are earnestly praying night and day to be able to see you face to face again and make up any shortcomings in your faith.

May God our Father himself, and our Lord Jesus Christ, make it easy for us to come to you.  May the Lord be generous in increasing your love and make you love one another and the whole human race as much as we love you.  And may he so conform your hearts in holiness that you may be blameless in the sight of our God and Father when our Lord Jesus Christ comes with all his saints.

Luke 21:25-31 (Revised English Bible):

[Jesus continued:]

Portents will appear in sun and moon and stars.  On earth nations will stand helpless, not knowing which way to turn from the roar and surge of the sea.  People will faint with terror at the thought of what is coming upon the world; for the celestial powers will be shaken.  Then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory.  When all this begins to happen, stand upright and hold your heads high, because your liberation is near.

Jesus told them a parable:

Look at the fig tree, or at any other tree.  As soon as it bud, you can see for yourselves that summer is near.  In the same way, when you see all this happening, you may know that the kingdom of God is near.

Truly I tell you:  the present generation will live to see it all.  Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away.

The Collect:

Almighty God, give us grace to cast away the works of darkness, and put on the armor of light, now in the time of this mortal life in which your Son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility; that in the last day, when he shall come again in his glorious majesty to judge both the living and the dead, we may rise to the life immortal; through him who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

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Some Related Posts:

Advent Prayers of Dedication:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2010/09/10/advent-prayers-of-dedication/

Advent Prayers of Praise and Adoration:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2010/09/10/advent-prayers-of-praise-and-adoration/

An Advent Prayer:  Expectant God:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2010/07/18/an-advent-prayer-expectant-god/

An Advent Prayer:  Divine Light:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2010/07/18/an-advent-prayer-divine-light/

An Advent Prayer:  The Word of God is Near:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2010/07/18/an-advent-prayer-the-word-of-god-is-near/

An Advent Prayer of Confession:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2010/07/18/an-advent-prayer-of-confession/

Advent Prayers of Thanksgiving:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2010/07/18/advent-prayers-of-thanksgiving/

An Advent Blessing:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2010/07/18/an-advent-blessing/

An Advent Prayer:  Expectant Hearts:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2010/07/18/an-advent-prayer-expectant-hearts/

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Advent is about what God has done, is doing, and will do.  God–in the form of Jesus–became human and dwelt among us.  God is present with us in the form of the Holy Spirit.  And we have the promise of a return of Christ.  Much of the New Testament reflects the unfulfilled expectation that he would return nearly 1,900 years ago.  Many times since then predicted dates for the Second Coming have passed without Jesus making a repeat appearance.  God’s timing is not ours.  So be it.

We who call ourselves Christians bear the responsibility to be salt and light in the world, to leave our part of it better than we found it.  We are at our best when we do that rather than slaughter each other over doctrinal disputes.  So may we be the best salt and the brightest light we can be, so that, regardless of what God’s timing turns out to be, we

may be blameless in the sight of our God and Father.  (1 Thessalonians 3:13, The New Jerusalem Bible).

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

DECEMBER 3, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JOHN OWEN SMITH, UNITED METHODIST BISHOP IN GEORGIA

THE FEAST OF SAINT FRANCIS XAVIER, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY IN ASIA

Published originally at ORDINARY TIME DEVOTIONS

Saints’ Days and Holy Days for December   Leave a comment

Poinsettia

Image Source = Andre Karwath

THIS IS THE RESET MODE OF THE DECEMBER CALENDAR, AFTER I HAVE CHANGED DATES AND BEFORE I FINISH ADDING SAINTS AS PART OF THE PROCESS OF RENOVATING MY ECUMENICAL CALENDAR OF SAINTS’ DAYS AND HOLY DAYS.

1 (Charles de Foucauld, Roman Catholic Hermit and Martyr)

  • Brioc, Roman Catholic Abbot; and Tudwal, Roman Catholic Abbot and Bishop
  • Douglas LeTell Rights, U.S. Moravian Minister, Scholar, and Hymn Writer
  • Edward Timothy Mickey, Jr., U.S. Moravian Bishop and Liturgist

2 (Channing Moore Williams, Episcopal Missionary Bishop in China and Japan)

  • Gerald Thomas Noel, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer; brother of Baptist Wriothesley Noel, Anglican Priest, English Baptist Evangelist, and Hymn Writer; and his niece, Caroline Maria Noel, Anglican Hymn Writer

3 (Maruthas, Roman Catholic Bishop of Maypherkat and Missionary to Persia)

  • Amilie Juliane, Countess of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, German Lutheran Hymn Writer
  • Archibald Campbell Tait, Archbishop of Canterbury
  • Francis Xavier, Roman Catholic Missionary to the Far East

4 (John of Damascus and Cosmas of Maiuma, Theologians and Hymnodists)

  • Bernard of Parma, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • John Calabria, Founder of the Congregation of the Poor Servants and the Poor Women Servants of Divine Providence
  • Joseph Mohr, Austrian Roman Catholic Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Osmund of Salisbury, Roman Catholic Bishop

5 (Clement of Alexandria, Father of Christian Scholarship)

  • Cyran, Roman Catholic Abbot
  • Nelson Mandela, President of South Africa, and Renewer of Society
  • Nicetius of Trier, Roman Catholic Monk, Abbot, and Bishop; and Aredius of Limoges, Roman Catholic Monk
  • Peter Mortimer, Anglo-German Moravian Educator, Musician, and Scholar; and Gottfried Theodor Erxleben, German Moravian Minister and Musicologist

6 (Nicholas of Myra, Roman Catholic Bishop)

  • Abraham of Kratia, Roman Catholic Monk, Abbot, Bishop, and Hermit
  • Alice Freeman Palmer, U.S. Educator and Hymn Writer
  • Henry Ustick Onderdonk, Episcopal Bishop, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer
  • Philip and Daniel Berrigan, Roman Catholic Priests and Social Activists

7 (Maria Josepha Rossello, Cofounder of the Daughters of Our Lady of Pity)

  • Anne Ross Cousin, Scottish Presbyterian Hymn Writer
  • Georg Friedrich Hellstrom, Dutch-German Moravian Musician, Composer, and Educator
  • William Gustave Polack, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer and Translator

8 (Martin Rinckart, German Lutheran Hymn Writer and Archdeacon of Eilenburg)

  • Amatus of Luxeuil and Romaric of Luxeuil, Roman Catholic Monks and Abbots
  • Erik Christian Hoff, Norwegian Lutheran Composer and Organist
  • Walter Ciszek, Roman Catholic Missionary Priest and Political Prisoner

9 (Peter Fourier, “The Good Priest of Mattaincourt;” and Alix Le Clerc, Foundress of the Congregation of Notre Dame of Canonesses Regular of Saint Augutine)

10 (Karl Barth, Swiss Reformed Minister, Theologian, and Biblical Scholar; father of Markus Barth, Swiss Lutheran Minister and Biblical Scholar)

  • Howell Elvet Lewis, Welsh Congregationalist Clergyman and Poet
  • John Roberts, Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr
  • Paul Eber, German Lutheran Theologian and Hymn Writer
  • Robert Murray, Canadian Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

11 (Luke of Prague and John Augusta, Moravian Bishops and Hymn Writers)

  • Kazimierz Tomas Sykulski, Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr
  • Lars Olsen Skrefsrud, Hans Peter Boerresen, and Paul Olaf Bodding, Lutheran Missionaries in India
  • Severin Ott, Roman Catholic Monk

12 (Jane Frances de Chantal, Founder of the Congregation of the Visitation)

  • Bartholomew Buonpedoni and Vivaldus, Ministers among Lepers
  • Ludwik Bartosik, Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1941
  • William Lloyd Garrison, Abolitionist and Feminist; and Maria Stewart, Abolitionist, Feminist, and Educator

13 (Samuel Johnson, “The Great Moralist”)

  • Christian Furchtegott Gellert, German Lutheran Minister, Educator, and Hymn Writer
  • Ella J. Baker, Witness for Civil Rights
  • Paul Speratus, German Lutheran Bishop, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer

14 (Venantius Honorius Clementius Fortunatus, Roman Catholic Bishop of Poitiers)

  • Dorothy Ann Thrupp, English Hymn Writer
  • John of the Cross, Roman Catholic Mystic

15 (Thomas Benson Pollock, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer)

  • Henry Fothergill Chorley, English Novelist, Playwright, and Literary and Music Critic
  • John Horden, Anglican Bishop of Moosenee
  • Ralph Wardlaw, Scottish Congregationalist Minister, Hymn Writer, and Liturgist
  • Robert McDonald, Anglican Priest and Missionary

16 (Ralph Adams Cram and Richard Upjohn, Architects; and John LaFarge, Sr., Painter and Stained Glass Window Maker)

  • Filip Siphong Onphithakt, Roman Catholic Catechist and Martyr in Thailand, 1940
  • Maude Dominica Petre, Roman Catholic Modernist Theologian

17 (Eglantyne Jebb and Dorothy Buxton, Founders of Save the Children)

  • Frank Mason North, U.S. Methodist Minister
  • Mary Cornelia Bishop Gates, U.S. Dutch Reformed Hymn Writer

18 (Marc Boegner, French Reformed Minister and Ecumenist)

  • Alicia Domon and Her Companions, Martyrs in Argentina, 1977
  • Giulia Valle, Roman Catholic Nun

19 (Raoul Wallenberg, Righteous Gentile)

  • Robert Campbell, Scottish Episcopalian then Roman Catholic Social Advocate and Hymn Writer

20 (Dominic of Silos, Roman Catholic Abbot)

21 (THOMAS THE APOSTLE, MARTYR)

22 (Frederick and William Temple, Archbishops of Canterbury)

  • Chaeremon and Ischyrion, Roman Catholic Martyrs, Circa 250
  • Chico Mendes, “Gandhi of the Amazon”
  • Henry Budd, First Anglican Native Priest in North America; Missionary to the Cree Nation
  • Isaac Hecker, Founder of the Missionary Society of St. Paul the Apostle

23 (John of Kanty, Roman Catholic Theologian)

  • Antonio Caldara, Roman Catholic Composer and Musician
  • Charbel, Roman Catholic Priest and Monk
  • James Prince Lee, Bishop of Manchester
  • William John Blew, English Priest and Hymn Writer

24 (CHRISTMAS EVE)

25 (CHRISTMAS DAY)

26 (SECOND DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Stephen, Deacon and Martyr

27 (THIRD DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • John the Evangelist, Apostle

28 (FOURTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Holy Innocents, Martyrs

29 (FIFTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • John Burnett Morris, Sr., Episcopal Priest and Witness for Civil Rights
  • Philipp Heinrich Molther, German Moravian Minister, Bishop, Composer, and Hymn Translator
  • Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury
  • Thomas Cotterill, English Priest, Hymn Writer, and Liturgist

30 (SIXTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Allen Eastman Cross, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Frances Joseph-Gaudet, Prison Reformer

31 (SEVENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • New Year’s Eve
  • Rossiter Worthington Raymond, U.S. Novelist, Poet, Hymn Writer, and Mining Engineer

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.