Archive for the ‘February 8’ Category

Feast of Cornelia Hancock (February 8)   Leave a comment

Above:  Brandy Station, Virginia, December 1863-April 1864

Photographer = James Gardner

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-cwpb-03963

Cornelia Hancock stands in front a tent on the right.

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CORNELIA HANCOCK (FEBRUARY 8, 1840-DECEMBER 31, 1927)

U.S. Quaker Nurse, Educator, and Humanitarian

“Florence Nightingale of North America”

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I am this moment talking to the most silly kind of Christian.  He wishes to know if I have “experienced Religion.”

–Cornelia Hancock

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Cornelia Hancock lived, not experienced, her religion.

Hancock comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Hancock, born in Hancock’s Bridge, New Jersey, on February 8, 1840, was a devout Quaker.  Some of her male relatives, despite being Quakers, joined the U.S. Army during the Civil War.  Our saint, without any training as a nurse, volunteered for duty as a nurse in the U.S. Army.  Dorothea Dix rejected Hancock for being too young and beautiful.  Youth, inexperience, and beauty did not prevent our saint from arriving at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on July 6, 1863, a few days after the conclusion of the great battle there.  Hancock served as a nurse for the rest of the war.  She preferred to serve in field hospitals, which she usually did.  Hancock also objected to people calling escaped slaves contraband.

Hancock devoted most of her life to serving God in the “least of these.”  After the Civil War, she founded the Laing School (for African Americans) in Pleasantville, South Carolina.  In 1878, our saint helped to found the Philadelphia Society for Organizing Charitable Relief and Repressing Mendiancy, later renamed Family Service of Philadelphia.  Hancock, who served on the board of the Children’s Aid Society from 1883 to 1895, retired to Atlantic City, New Jersey, in 1914.  She died there, aged 87 years, on December 31, 1927.

One of the greatest lessons from the Bible is that God does not call the qualified.  No, God qualifies the called.

What has God qualified you, O reader, to do for others?

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 11, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT PAPHNUTIUS THE GREAT, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF UPPER THEBAID

THE FEAST OF ANNE HOULDITCH, ANGLICAN NOVELIST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF JOHN STAINER AND WALTER GALPIN ALCOCK, ANGLICAN CHURCH ORGANISTS AND COMPOSERS

THE FEAST OF SAINT PATIENS OF LYONS, ROMAN CATHOLIC ARCHBISHOP

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Almighty God, whose prophets taught us righteousness in the care of your poor:

By the guidance of your Holy Spirit, grant that we may do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly in your sight;

through Jesus Christ, our Judge and Redeemer, who lives and reigns

with you and the same Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Isaiah 55:11-56:1

Psalm 2:1-2, 10-12

Acts 14:14-17, 21-23

Mark 4:21-29

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 736

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Feast of St. Jerome Emiliani (February 8)   1 comment

emiliani

Above:  St. Jerome Emiliani

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT JEROME EMILIANI (1481-FEBRUARY 8, 1537)

Founder of the Company of the Servants of the Poor

St. Jerome Emiliani, like Blessed Josephina Gabriella Bonino, whose feast day is also February 8, cared for the ill, the poor, and the orphaned.

Emiliani arrived at this vocation by a circuitous route.  The native of Venice came from a wealthy family.  His father, Angelo, died when our saint was 15 years old.  Young Jerome ran away from home and led a dissolute life.  In 1506 he became a solider.  Five years later, during the War of the League of Cambrai (1508-1516), Emiliani became a prisoner of war chained in a dungeon.  He broke his chains after praying to Our Lady for help.  Our saint gave her credit for his freedom.  Eventually Emiliani decided to study for the priesthood.  Along the way to that vocation our saint supervised the education of his nephews and served as the Mayor of Treviso.

Emiliani, ordained in 1518, spent much of the rest of his life helping people affected by one pestilence or another.  The parts of Italy where Emiliani resided were prone to a series of plagues in the 1500s.  He cared for the sick, took orphans into his home, and buried those who had died unattended on the streets.  Our saint founded six orphanages, a hospital, and a shelter for former prostitutes in northern Italy.  At the city of Somasca Emiliani founded the Company of the Servants of the Poor, also known as the Order of Somaschi, the Somascan Fathers, and the Regular Clergy of Somasca, to care for orphans, in 1532.  Papal approval of the order followed eight years later.  Another accomplishment of Emiliani was pioneering the question-and-answer technique of catechesis.

Emiliani died at Somasca, Italy, on February 8, 1537.  He had contracted an illness while ministering to the sick.  Pope Benedict XIV beatified our saint in 1747.  Pope Clement XIII canonized him 20 years later.

Emiliani is the patron saint of orphans and abandoned people.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 29, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF GEORGE DAWSON, ENGLISH BAPTIST AND UNITARIAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF THE INAUGURATION OF THE CHURCH OF NORTH INDIA, 1970

THE FEAST OF JENNETTE THRELFALL, ENGLISH HYMN WRITER

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O God, by whose grace your servant St. Jerome Emiliani,

kindled with the flame of your love, became a burning and a shining light in your Church:

Grant that we also may be aflame with the spirit of love and discipline,

and walk before you as children of light;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Acts 2:42-47a

Psalm 133 or 34:1-8 or 119:161-168

2 Corinthians 6:1-10

Matthew 6:24-33

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 723

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Feast of Blessed Josephina Gabriella Bonino (February 8)   1 comment

bonino

Above:  Blessed Josephina Gabriella Bonino 

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED JOSEPHINA GABRIELLA BONINO (SEPTEMBER 5, 1843-FEBRUARY 8, 1906)

Foundress of the Sisters of the Holy Family

Blessed Josephina Gabriella Bonino cared for her poor, sick, and orphaned neighbors.

Our saint always devout, grew up in a Roman Catholic family in Saviglioano, Italy.  At age 18 she took a vow of chastity.  Eight years later she began to take care of her ailing father.  Then, in 1875, she joined the Third Order of Carmelites.  Two years later her mother died.  In 1881 our saint founded the Sisters of the Holy Family, for the purpose of caring for orphans, the poor, and the elderly sick.  She served as the Superior of the order for the rest of her life.  Bonino died of pneumonia at Savona, Italy, on February 8, 1906.  She was 62 years old.

Pope John Paul II declared Bonino a Venerable in 1994 then a Blessed the following year.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 29, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF GEORGE DAWSON, ENGLISH BAPTIST AND UNITARIAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF THE INAUGURATION OF THE CHURCH OF NORTH INDIA, 1970

THE FEAST OF JENNETTE THRELFALL, ENGLISH HYMN WRITER

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O God, whose blessed Son became poor that we through his poverty might be rich:

Deliver us from an inordinate love of this world, that we,

inspired by the devotion of your servant Blessed Josephina Gabriella Bonino,

may serve you with singleness of heart, and attain to the riches of the age to come;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Song of Songs 8:6-7

Psalm 34

Philippians 3:7-15

Luke 12:33-37 or Luke 9:57-62

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 722

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Feast of Sts. John of Matha and Felix of Valois (February 8)   Leave a comment

Above:  Trinitarian Emblem

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT JOHN OF MATHA (JUNE 23, 1160-DECEMBER 17, 1213)

and 

SAINT FELIX OF VALOIS (1126-NOVEMBER 4, 1212)

Founders of the Order of the Most Holy Trinity (The Trinitarians)

St. Felix’s feast transferred from November 20

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St. John of Matha entered the world at Faucon, Provence, on June 23, 1160.  He studied at Aix then returned to Faucon, where he became a hermit.  Then he left for Paris, where he earned his doctorate of theology in 1197 before joining the hermitage (at Cerfroid) which St. Felix of Valois governed.  St. John told St. Felix of his vocation to found a religious order dedicated to the ransoming of Christian captives from Muslims.  The two men traveled to Rome in late 1197 and received Papal approval in 1198.  St. John, headquartered in Ibera, became the first Superior of the Order of the Most Holy Trinity, and St. Felix ran the French province of the order from Cerfroid.  Members of the order (working from 600 monasteries by 1240) succeeded in their labors.

The Order of the Most Holy Trinity exists today to,  in the words of their official website, “help all who suffer uncommon hardships, especially those who suffer for their faith or who are poor.”  That is a timeless vocation.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

DECEMBER 2, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF CHANNING MOORE WILLIAMS

THE FEAST OF JOHN BROWN, ABOLITIONIST

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Lord God,

you have surrounded us with so great a cloud of witnesses.

Grant that we, encouraged by the example of your servants Saints John of Matha and Felix of Valois,

may persevere in the course that is set before us and,

at the last, share in your eternal joy with all the saints in light,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Micah 6:6-8

Psalm 9:1-10

1 Corinthians 1:26-31

Luke 6:20-23

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 59

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Revised on November 29, 2016

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Saints’ Days and Holy Days for February   Leave a comment

Winter, by Hendrick Avercamp

Image in the Public Domain

1 (Henry Morse, English Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1645)

  • Benedict Daswa, South African Roman Catholic Catechist and Martyr, 1990
  • Charles Seymour Robinson, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Hymn Writer, and Hymnologist
  • Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina, Italian Roman Catholic Composer and Musician
  • Mitchell J. Dahood, Roman Catholic Priest and Biblical Scholar
  • Sigebert III, King of Austrasia

2 (PRESENTATION OF JESUS IN THE TEMPLE)

3 (Anskar and Rimbert, Roman Catholic Archbishops of Hamburg-Bremen)

  • Adelaide Anne Procter, English Poet and Feminist
  • Alfred Delp, German Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1945
  • James Nicholas Joubert and Marie Elizabeth Lange, Founders of the Oblate Sisters of Providence
  • Jemima Thompson Luke, English Congregationalist Hymn Writer; and James Edmeston, Anglican Hymn Writer
  • Samuel Davies, American Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

4 (CORNELIUS THE CENTURION)

5 (Martyrs of Japan, 1597-1639)

  • Avitus of Vienne, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • Jane (Joan) of Valois, Co-Founder of the Sisters of the Annunciation
  • Pedro Arrupe, Advocate for the Poor and Marginalized, and Superior General of the Society of Jesus
  • Phileas and Philoromus, Roman Catholic Martyrs, 304

6 (Marcus Aurelius Clemens Prudentius, Poet and Hymn Writer)

  • Danny Thomas, U.S. Roman Catholic Entertainer and Humanitarian; Founder of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
  • Mateo Correa-Magallanes and Miguel Agustin Pro, Mexican Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs, 1927
  • Vedast (Vaast), Roman Catholic Bishop of Arras and Cambrai

7 (Helder Camara, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Olinda and Recife)

  • Adalbert Nierychlewski, Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1942
  • Daniel J. Harrington, U.S. Roman Catholic Priest and Biblical Scholar
  • Gregorio Allegri, Italian Roman Catholic Priest, Composer, and Singer; brother of Domenico Allegri, Italian Roman Catholic Composer and Singer
  • Moses, Apostle to the Saracens
  • William Boyce and John Alcock, Anglican Composers

8 (Josephine Bakhita, Roman Catholic Nun)

  • Cornelia Hancock, U.S. Quaker Nurse, Educator, and Humanitarian; “Florence Nightingale of North America”
  • Jerome Emiliani, Founder of the Company of the Servants of the Poor
  • John of Matha and Felix of Valois, Founders of the Order of the Most Holy Trinity
  • Josephina Gabriella Bonino, Founder of the Sisters of the Holy Family

9 (Bruce M. Metzger, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Biblical Scholar, and Biblical Translator)

  • Alto of Altomunster, Roman Catholic Hermit
  • Porfirio, Martyr, 203

10 (Scholastica, Abbess of Plombariola; and her twin brother, Benedict of Nursia, Abbot of Monte Cassino and Father of Western Monasticism)

  • Benedict of Aniane, Restorer of Western Monasticism; and Ardo, Roman Catholic Abbot
  • Henry Williams Baker, Anglican Priest, Hymnal Editor, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator
  • Norbert of Xanten, Founder of the Premonstratensians; Hugh of Fosses, Second Founder of the Premonstratensians; and Evermod, Bishop of Ratzeburg
  • Philip Armes, Anglican Church Organist

11 (ONESIMUS, BISHOP OF BYZANTIUM)

12 (Absalom Jones, Richard Allen, and Jarena Lee, Evangelists and Social Activists)

  • Benjamin Schmolck, German Lutheran Pastor and Hymn Writer
  • Charles Freer Andrews, Anglican Priest
  • Julia Williams Garnet, African-American Abolitionist and Educator; her husband, Henry Highland Garnet, African-American Presbyterian Minister and Abolitionist; his second wife, Sarah J. Smith Tompkins Garnet, African-American Suffragette and Educator; her sister, Susan Maria Smith McKinney Steward, African-American Physician; and her second husband, Theophilus Gould Steward, U.S. African Methodist Episcopal Minister, Army Chaplain, and Professor
  • Michael Weisse, German Moravian Minister and Hymn Writer and Translator; and Jan Roh, Bohemian Moravian Bishop and Hymn Writer
  • Orange Scott, U.S. Methodist Minister, Abolitionist, and first President of the Wesleyan Methodist Connection

13 (AQUILA, PRISCILLA, AND APOLLOS, CO-WORKERS OF SAINT PAUL THE APOSTLE)

14 (Abraham of Carrhae, Roman Catholic Bishop)

  • Christoph Carl Ludwig von Pfeil, German Lutheran Hymn Writer
  • Cyril and Methodius, Apostles to the Slavs
  • Francis Harold Rowley, Northern Baptist Minister, Humanitarian, and Hymn Writer
  • Johann Michael Altenburg, German Lutheran Pastor, Composer, and Hymn Writer
  • Victor Olof Petersen, Swedish-American Lutheran Hymn Translator

15 (New Martyrs of Libya, 2015)

  • Ben Salmon, U.S. Roman Catholic Pacifist and Conscientious Objector
  • Henry B. Whipple, Episcopal Bishop of Minnesota
  • John Tietjen, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Ecumenist, and Bishop
  • Michael Praetorius, German Lutheran Composer and Musicologist
  • Thomas Bray, Anglican Priest and Missionary

16 (Philipp Melanchthon, German Lutheran Theologian and Scribe of the Reformation)

  • Charles Todd Quintard, Episcopal Bishop of Tennessee
  • Christian Frederick Martin, Sr., and Charles Augustus Zoebisch, German-American Instrument Makers
  • Louis (Lewis) F. Kampmann, U.S. Moravian Minister, Missionary, and Hymn Translator
  • Nicholas Kasatkin, Orthodox Archbishop of All Japan

17 (August Crull, German-American Lutheran Minister, Poet, Professor, Hymnodist, and Hymn Translator)

  • Antoni Leszczewicz, Polish Roman Catholic Priest, and His Companions, Martyrs, 1943
  • Edward Hopper, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Janini Luwum, Ugandan Anglican Archbishop and Martyr, 1977
  • Johann Heermann, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer
  • John Meyendorff, Russian-French-American Orthodox Priest, Scholar, and Ecumenist

18 (Colman of Lindisfarne, Agilbert, and Wilfrid, Bishops)

  • Barbasymas, Sadoth of Seleucia, and Their Companions, Martyrs, 342
  • Guido di Pietro, a.k.a. Fra Angelico, Roman Catholic Monk and Artist
  • James Drummond Burns, Scottish Presbyterian Minister, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator

19 (Nerses I the Great, Catholicos of the Armenian Apostolic Church; and Mesrop, Bible Translator)

  • Agnes Tsao Kou Ying, Agatha Lin Zhao, and Lucy Yi Zhenmei, Chinese Roman Catholic Catechists and Martyrs, 1856, 1858, and 1862; Auguste Chapdelaine, French Roman Catholic Priest, Missionary, and Martyr, 1856; and Laurentius Bai Xiaoman, Chinese Roman Catholic Convert and Martyr, 1856
  • Bernard Barton, English Quaker Poet and Hymn Writer
  • Elizabeth C. Clephane, Scottish Presbyterian Humanitarian and Hymn Writer
  • Massey H. Shepherd, Jr., Episcopal Priest, Ecumenist, and Liturgist; Dean of American Liturgists

20 (Henri de Lucac, French Roman Catholic Priest, Cardinal, and Theologian)

  • Stanislawa Rodzinska, Polish Roman Catholic Nun and Martyr, 1945
  • Wulfric of Haselbury, Roman Catholic Hermit

21 (John Henry Newman, English Roman Catholic Priest-Cardinal)

  • Arnulf of Metz, Roman Catholic Bishop; and Germanus of Granfel, Roman Catholic Abbot and Martyr, 677
  • Robert Southwell, English Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1595
  • Thomas Pormort, English Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1592

22 (Hans Scholl, Sophie Scholl, and Christoph Probst, Anti-Nazi Martyrs at Munich, Germany, 1943)

  • Bernhardt Severin Ingemann, Danish Lutheran Author and Hymn Writer of Cortona, Penitent and Founder of the Poor Ones
  • Praetextatus, Roman Catholic Bishop of Rouen
  • Thomas Binney, English Congregationalist Minister, Liturgist, and “Archbishop of Nonconformity”

23 (Ignatius of Antioch, Polycarp of Smyrna, and Irenaeus of Lyons, Bishops and Martyrs, 107/115, 155/156, and Circa 202)

  • Alexander Akimetes, Roman Catholic Abbot
  • Austin Carroll (Margaret Anne Carroll), Irish-American Roman Catholic Nun, Author, and Educator
  • Samuel Wolcott, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Missionary, and Hymn Writer
  • Stefan Wincenty Frelichowski, Polish Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1945
  • Willigis, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Mainz; and Bernward, Roman Catholic Bishop of Hildesheim

24 (MATTHIAS THE APOSTLE, MARTYR)

25 (Gregory of Nazianzus the Elder, Nonna, and Their ChildrenGregory of Nazianzus the Younger, Caesarius of Nazianzus, and Gorgonia of Nazianzus)

  • Bernhardt Severin Ingemann, Danish Lutheran Author and Hymn Writer
  • Felix Varela, Cuban Roman Catholic Priest and Patriot
  • John Roberts, Episcopal Missionary to the Shoshone and Arapahoe
  • Karl Friedrich Lochner, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Theodor Fliedner, Renewer of the Female Diaconate; and Elizabeth Fedde, Norwegian Lutheran Deaconess

26 (Antonio Valdivieso, Roman Catholic Bishop of Leon, and Martyr, 1495)

  • Andrew Reed, English Congregationalist Minister, Humanitarian, and Hymn Writer
  • Charles Sheldon, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Author, Christian Socialist, and Social Gospel Theologian
  • Emily Malbone Morgan, Founder of the Society of the Companions of the Holy Cross
  • Jakob Hutter, Founder of the Hutterities, and Anabaptist Martyr, 1536; and his wife, Katharina Hutter, Anabaptist Martyr, 1538
  • Paula of Saint Joseph of Calasanz, Founder of the Daughters of Mary

27 (Nicholas Ferrar, Anglican Deacon and Founder of Little Gidding; George Herbert, Anglican Priest and Metaphysical Poet; and All Saintly Parish Priests)

  • Anne Line and Roger Filcock, English Roman Catholic Martyrs, 1601
  • Fred Rogers, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Host of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood
  • Gabriel Possenti, Roman Catholic Penitent
  • Marian Anderson, African-American Singer and Civil Rights Activist
  • Raphael of Brooklyn, Syrian-American Russian Orthodox Bishop of Brooklyn

28 (Anna Julia Haywood Cooper and Elizabeth Evelyn Wright, African-American Educators)

  • Mary Lyon, U.S. Congregationalist Feminist and Educator
  • Joseph Badger, Sr., U.S. Congregationalist and Presbyterian Minister; First Missionary to the Western Reserve
  • Samuel Simon Schmucker, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Theologian, and Social Reformer

29 (John Cassian and John Climacus, Roman Catholic Monks and Spiritual Writers)

  • Luis de Leon, Spanish Roman Catholic Priest and Theologian
  • Patrick Hamilton, First Scottish Protestant Martyr, 1528

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.

Feast of St. Josephine Bakhita (February 8)   Leave a comment

Above:  St. Josephine Bakhita

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT JOSEPHINE BAKHITA (1869-FEBRUARY 8, 1947)

Roman Catholic Nun

Slavery exists in various forms, all of which are abominations.  St. Josephine Bakhita‘s life calls our attention to this institution, which continues to exist.

Above:  A Map of Darfur Today

Image in the Public Domain

Born in Olgossa, Darfur, The Sudan, the saint became a slave at nine years of age.  (Some sources say this happened at age seven or twelve, but the saints book I consulted says nine.)  During her time in slavery, several masters owned her, and some abused her in various ways, including scarring her and tattooing her body extensively.  And one master forced her to convert to Islam.  The trauma of slavery caused the saint to forget her birth name, but slavers gave her the name Bakhita, which means “fortunate.”

Callisto Legnani, the Italian Consul to The Sudan, purchased Bakhita in 1882.  Two years later, he gave her to Augusto Michieli, his friend, who took her to Italy in 1885.  The saint functioned as nanny to Michieli’s daughter, Mimmina.  During this time Bakhita decided to join the Roman Catholic Church, an institution she joined in 1890.  This confirmation (under the baptismal name Josephine) resulted from the fact that the saint stayed at a Canossian convent when Augusto Michieli was away on business.

Afterward, when Michieli tried to take Josephine back to Africa, she refused.  A court case ensued, and the verdict was that since there was no slavery in Italy, she had been free since 1885.  The path was clear for the saint to become a nun, which she did in 1896.

A free woman and a Canossian nun, St. Josephine Bakhita was fortunate indeed.  She dedicated most of her adult life to the simple yet vital ministry of hospitality.  She engaged in many mundane tasks, such as cooking and sewing, and was kind to many children.  She was beloved by many, especially her fellow nuns.  “Be good, love the Lord, pray for those who love him.  What a great grace it is to know God!”, she said.

The saint was ill at the end of her life.  Her mind returned to the agony of slavery toward the end, but her last words (“Madonna! Madonna!”) were hopeful.

Pope John Paul II beatified St. Josephine Bakhita in 1992 and canonized her eight years later.

This is a dramatic story.  Your story might not be so dramatic, and mine is not, either.  Yet all of us can be kind and loving to others.  May we do so.

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Micah 6:6-8

Psalm 84

Galatians 3:26-29

Matthew 25:31-46

God of liberation, we thank you for your graces extended to and expressed through the life of St. Josephine Bakhita.  May we take courage from her example and show your love to those around us.  In the name of the Father, who loves us; Jesus, who identifies with our suffering; and the Holy Spirit, who is ever with us.  Amen.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

OCTOBER 15, 2010 COMMON ERA

THE FEASTS OF ST. TERESA OF AVILA, NUN, AND ROBERT HERRICK, POET

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Revised on November 29, 2016

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