Archive for the ‘January 24’ Category

Feast of George A. Buttrick and David G. Buttrick (January 24)   Leave a comment

Above:  Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

Image in the Public Domain

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GEORGE ARTHUR BUTTRICK (MARCH 23, 1892-JANUARY 23, 1980)

Anglo-American Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar

father of

DAVID GARDNER BUTTRICK (MAY 21, 1927-APRIL 22, 2017)

U.S. Presbyterian then United Church of Christ Minister, Theologian, and Liturgist

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Prayer is not a substitute for work, thinking, watching, suffering, or giving; prayer is a support for all other efforts.

–George Arthur Buttrick

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Preaching must accept the challenge to reach the hearts and minds of people and regain the luster it has lost in the last several decades.

–David Gardner Buttrick, 1996

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INTRODUCTION

The Buttricks come to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Interpreter’s Bible and The New Interpreter’s Bible.

George Arthur Buttrick was deeply involved in The Interpreter’s Bible.  He served as the Commentary Editor for the twelve-volume set.  He also wrote one of the General Articles, “The Study of the Bible,” in Volume I (1952).  Furthermore, Buttrick wrote the exposition on Matthew (Volume VII, 1951), Luke 13-18 (Volume VIII, 1952), and Philemon (Volume XI, 1955).

David Gardner Buttrick wrote an article, “The Use of the Bible in Preaching,” for Volume I (1994) of The New Interpreter’s Bible.

George Arthur Buttrick and David Gardner Buttrick, father and son, were renowned preachers, professors, and theologians.

GEORGE ARTHUR BUTTRICK

George Arthur Buttrick, born in Seaham, England, on March 23, 1892, became one of the most influential preachers in the United States.  He studied at Victoria University of Manchester and married Agnes Gardner (1893-1990) before immigrating to the United States.  Buttrick became a minister in the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.  He was a pastor in Quincy, Illinois; and Rutland, Vermont; before becoming pastor of First Presbyterian Church, Buffalo, New York.  He succeeded Henry Sloane Coffin (1877-1954) at Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church, New York, New York, in 1927, and served until 1954.  In New York City, on May 21, 1927, the Buttricks welcomed their youngest son, David Gardner Buttrick.

George had a strong social compass and a good moral compass.  He, a pacifist and a supporter of civil rights, was the Preacher to the University and the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at Harvard University from 1954 to 1960.  He also taught at the following:

  1. Union Theological Seminary, New York, New York;
  2. Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Evanston, Illinois;
  3. Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina;
  4. Vanderbilt Divinity School, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee; and
  5. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky.

He died, aged 87 years, in Louisville, Kentucky, on January 23, 1980.

DAVID GARDNER BUTTRICK

David Gardner Buttrick was a chip off the old block.  He, a graduate of Haverford College (B.A., 1948), Union Theological Seminary (1951), Garrett Biblical Institute, and Northwestern University, earned degrees in theology, poetry, and contemporary literature.  He married Betty More Allaban (d. 2015) in 1950.

Buttrick was a Presbyterian minister from 1951 to 1993.  He was a clergyman of, in order, the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (1951-1958), The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (1958-1983), and the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) (1983-1993).  Our saint, pastor of First Presbyterian Church, Fredonia, New York (1951-1960), served on the denominational Board of Christian Education (1960-1961) then taught at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary (1961-1975).  Buttrick resigned from the faculty in protest after the seminary, in financial difficulty, laid off much of the staff and gave raises to professors.  While at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, our saint contributed to The Book of Common Worship–Provisional Services and Lectionary for the Christian Year (1966).  He was also the main author of The Worshipbook–Services (1970), incorporated into The Worshipbook–Services and Hymns (1972).

Buttrick, author of 19 books and many articles, continued teaching after leaving Pittsburgh Theological Seminary.  He was the Marten Professor of Homiletics at the St. Meinrad School of Theology (1975-1982), St. Meinrad, Indiana.  Our saint moved to Nashville, Tennessee, in 1982.  There he led an interdisciplinary initiative of the Vanderbilt Divinity School and the Graduate School of Religion.  The program combined liturgy, preaching, and other disciplines.

Buttrick, who did not shy away from a moral confrontation, resigned from the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) in 1993.  The PC(USA), he said, needed to be bolder.  It needed to be more welcoming and affirming of diversity and to support civil rights for all people, he insisted.  Our saint joined the United Church of Christ.

Buttrick, aged 89 years, died in Nashville, Tennessee, on April 22, 2017.

EARLY CONTEMPORARY LITURGY

My only critical comments come from an Episcopalian perspective on liturgy.

The late 1960s and early 1970s were an awkward time for Christian liturgy in the United States.  Modern English was taking over from archaic English in many denominations.  Nearly all of the volumes from the first wave of modern English-language liturgy became dated quickly.

The Worshipbook (1970 and 1972) is a product of its time, much like its contemporary, Leonard Bernstein‘s MASS (1971).  The Worshipbook (1970) is an advance in Presbyterian liturgy, but it pales in comparison to its immediate successor, The Book of Common Worship (1993).  The placement of Holy Communion as the central act of worship is proper, but the rites for daily Morning Prayer and Morning Prayer in The Worshipbook are inadequate, especially compared to their counterparts from The Book of Common Prayer (1979).  The passage of time is unkind to The Worshipbook.

CONCLUSION

Both Buttricks were men of great faith and profound moral courage.

That is their primary legacy.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 1, 2019 COMMON ERA

PROPER 17:  THE TWELFTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, YEAR C

THE FEAST OF SAINT DIONYSIUS EXIGUUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK AND REFORMER OF THE CALENDAR

THE FEAST OF DAVID PENDLETON OAKERHATER, CHEYENNE WARRIOR, CHIEF, AND HOLY MAN, AND EPISCOPAL DEACON AND MISSIONARY IN OKLAHOMA

THE FEAST OF SAINT FIACRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC HERMIT

THE FEAST OF FRANÇOIS MAURIAC, FRENCH ROMAN CATHOLIC NOVELIST, CHRISTIAN HUMANIST, AND SOCIAL CRITIC

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Almighty God, we praise you for your servants George Arthur Buttrick and David Gardner Buttrick,

through whom you have called the church to its tasks and renewed its life.

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your church and proclaim the reality of your reign,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, now and forever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 600

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Feast of Blessed Marie Poussepin (January 24)   Leave a comment

Above:  Blessed Marie Poussepin

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED MARIE POUSSEPIN (OCTOBER 14, 1653-JANUARY 24, 1744)

Foundress of the Dominican Sisters of Charity of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin

Alternative feast day = October 14

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Do your best and pray fervently to obtain the capacities you lack.

–Blessed Marie Poussepin

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Blessed Marie Poussepin spent most of her life serving God in the less fortunate.  She, born in Dourdan, Essone, France, on October 14, 1653, grew up in a devout family.  Claude, her father, was a stocking manufacturer.  Our saint’s mother was usually ill.  The mother died when Marie was 22 years old.  Our saint, accustomed to being a caregiver, began to run the household and to care for her ailing father, rather than join a contemplative religious order.  After Claude died in 1683, our saint assumed control of the family business, which she modernized.  After a few years, Marie gave the business to a brother and focused on religious life.

Our saint became a Dominican tertiary in 1690.  She, head of the local Confraternity of Charity in 1693-1694, began to care for people in her home.  At Sainville, in 1695, Poussepin founded the first house of the Dominican Sisters of Charity of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin.  Our saint was responsible for educating many children and providing much health care in parts of rural France.

Poussepin, aged 90 years, died in Sainville on January 24, 1744.

Pope John Paul II declared Poussepin a Venerable in 1991 then beatified her in 1994.

The order continues its good works in 36 countries.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 31, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT NICODEMUS, DISCIPLE OF JESUS

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served, and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 60

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Feast of the Ordination of Florence Li Tom-Oi (January 24)   Leave a comment

florence-li-tom-oi

Above:  Icon of Florence Li Tim-Oi

Image Source = Link

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FLORENCE LI TIM-OI (MAY 5, 1907-FEBRUARY 26, 1992)

First Female Priest in the Anglican Communion

Ordained on January 25, 1944

All civil rights issues are inherently theological and contingent upon the reality that all people bear the image of God.  Among these civil rights issues is the equality of men and women in the Church.  This remains a controversial argument, unfortunately.

Florence Li Tim-Oi was a pioneer in the continuing struggle for the equality of women in the Church.

Tim-Oi (“Much Beloved”) born in Hong Kong on May 5, 1907, chose the baptized name Florence, after Florence Nightingale.  She became a deaconess in 1931, studied theology for four years in Canton, and, on the Feast of the Ascension, 1941, became a deacon.  She served a parish in Macao.  Wartime circumstances meant that a priest could not come to the Portuguese colony regularly, so Bishop Ronald Owen Hall (in office 1932-1951) of the Anglican Diocese of Victoria (spanning Hong Kong and South China) licensed her to preside at the Holy Eucharist.  Finally, on January 25, 1944, in the village of Shui Hing, Hall ordained our saint a priest.  She was already functioning as one, he reasoned.  Due to the controversy regarding her priestly ordination Tim-Oi surrendered her license (yet not her Holy Orders) in 1946.  From 1947 to 1949 she served as the Rector of St. Barnabas Church, Hepui; Bishop Hall ordered that people refer to her as a priest.

In 1949 the People’s Republic of China supplanted the Republic of China on the mainland.  Tim-Oi continued her theological studies.  She also served and taught at the Cathedral of Our Savior, Guangzhou.  Then, in 1958, the People’s Republic closed all the churches.  Our saint had to work on a farm then in a factory.  She was able to resume her public ministry in 1979.

Tim-Oi, while visiting relatives in Canada in 1981, had an opportunity to exercise her priestly office in that country.  The Anglican Diocese of Montreal licensed her; the Diocese of Ontario followed suit two years later.  She died at Toronto on February 26, 1992.  She was 84 years old.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 24, 2016 COMMON ERA

THANKSGIVING DAY (U.S.A.)

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM COOKE AND BENJAMIN WEBB, ANGLICAN PRIESTS AND TRANSLATORS OF HYMNS

THE FEAST OF SAINTS ANDREW DUNG-LAC AND PETER THI, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS AND MARTYRS IN VIETNAM

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Gracious God, we thank you for calling Florence Li Tim-Oi, much beloved daughter,

to be the first woman to exercise the office of a priest in our Communion:

By the grace of your Spirit, inspire us to follow her example,

serving your people with patience and happiness all our days,

and witnessing in every circumstance to our Savior Jesus Christ,

who lives and reigns with you and the same Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Numbers 11:16-17, 24-29

Psalm 99 or 27:1-9

1 Corinthians 3:5-11

John 4:31-38

A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  A Calendar of Commemorations (2016)

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Feast of the Martyrs of Podlasie (January 24)   Leave a comment

martyrs-of-pratulin

Above:  Icon of the Martyrs of Podlasie

Image in the Public Domain

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THE MARTYRS OF PODLASIE (SHOT JANUARY 14, 1874)

Also known as the Martyrs of Pratulin

The Russian Empire, at its height, contained 100 ethnic groups.  The empire, not encouraging multiculturalism, pursued a policy of Russification instead.  As part of this effort the government sought to convert Eastern Rite Roman Catholics within its realm to the Russian Orthodox Church and used force to make this happen.  Bishops and priests who refused to submit either went to Siberia or to prison.  This strategy left members of the laity to defend their faith.

On January 24, 1874, Russian soldiers entered the Polish village of Pratulin, in the region of Podlasie, to seize the parish church for the Russian Orthodox Church.  A crowd of villagers gathered to protest this action.  The military commander ordered them to disperse and threatened them if they disobeyed.  To encourage submission he ordered the fatal shooting of 13 laymen, who were singing hymns.   These martyrs were:

  1. Anicet Hryciuk (born in 1855),
  2. Bartlomiej Orypiuk (born in 1843),
  3. Daniel Karmasz (born in 1826),
  4. Filip Geryluk (born in 1830),
  5. Ignacy Franczuk (born in 1824),
  6. Jan Andrzejuk (born in 1848),
  7. Konstanty Bojko (born in 1826),
  8. Konstanty Lukaszuk (born in 1829),
  9. Lukasz Bojko (born in 1852),
  10. Maksym Hawryluk (born in 1840),
  11. Michal Wawryszuk (born in 1853),
  12. Onufry Wasyluk (born in 1853), and
  13. Wincenty Lewoniuk (born in 1849).

Then the soldiers buried the corpses without sacred rites.  The idea was to cause people to forget that these men had even lived.  The soldiers failed, obviously.  Pope John Paul II beatified the martyrs in 1996.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 24, 2016 COMMON ERA

THANKSGIVING DAY (U.S.A.)

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM COOKE AND BENJAMIN WEBB, ANGLICAN PRIESTS AND TRANSLATORS OF HYMNS

THE FEAST OF SAINTS ANDREW DUNG-LAC AND PETER THI, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS AND MARTYRS IN VIETNAM

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Almighty God, by whose grace and power your holy Martyrs of Podlasie

triumphed over suffering and were faithful even to death:

Grant us, who now remember them in thanksgiving,

to be so faithful in our witness to you in this world,

that we may receive with them the crown of life;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you

and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) 51:1-12

Psalm 116 or 116:1-8

Revelation 7:13-17

Luke 12:2-12

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 714

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Feast of St. Suranus of Sora (January 24)   Leave a comment

533-600

Above:  Italy, 533-600

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT SURANUS OF SORA (DIED CIRCA 580)

Roman Catholic Abbot and Martyr

As St. Laurence of Rome (died in 258) understood, the poor are the treasures of the Church.  Roman imperial officials during the Valerian persecution (257-260) did not like that answer when they sought treasures to seize for the empire, so they roasted him alive on a gridiron.

St. Suranus of Sora came from the same theological cloth as St. Laurence.  St. Suranus was the abbot of the monastery at Sora, Italy.  The Lombards had invaded Italy and were seeking items to plunder.  Our saint gave away the physical treasures of the monastery to refugees, the real treasures of the Church.  When Lombards arrived at the monastery they found no loot, so they murdered the abbot out of spite.

Today the Roman Catholic Church remembers St. Suranus with honor.

Violent people, such as the Emperor Valerian’s forces in the time of St Laurence of Rome and the Lombards in the time of St. Suranus of Sora, have always been present.  The names, places, and timeframes vary, but sin and human nature remain constant.  The barbarians at the gate might be from the government or they might be non-state actors.  Regardless of their origin, they are agents of perfidy who might seem, in the short term, to have triumphed.  In reality, however, they are accountable to the God of Sts. Laurence and Suranus.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 23, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JOHN KENNETH PFOHL, SR., U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP; HIS WIFE, HARRIET ELIZABETH “BESSIE” WHITTINGTON PFOHL, U.S. MORAVIAN MUSICIAN; AND THEIR SON, JAMES CHRISTIAN PFOHL, SR., U.S. MORAVIAN MUSICIAN

THE FEAST OF CASPAR FRIEDRICH NACHTENHOFER, GERMAN LUTHERAN MUSICIAN, LITURGIST, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT CLEMENT OF ROME, BISHOP

THE FEAST OF SAINT COLUMBAN, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT

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Gracious God, in every age you have sent men and women

who have given their lives in witness to your love and truth.

Inspire us with the memory of St. Suranus of Sora,  whose faithfulness led to the way of the cross,

and give us courage to bear full witness with our lives to your Son’s victory over sin and death,

for he lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 20:40-42

Psalm 5

Revelation 6:9-11

Mark 8:34-38

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 59

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Third Sunday after the Epiphany, Year B   Leave a comment

Above:  Donkeys

Image Source = Mates II

Putting the Saddlebags on Jesus, Not the Donkey

JANUARY 24, 2021

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Jonah 3:1-5, 10 (New Revised Standard Version):

The word of the LORD came to Jonah a second time, saying,

Get up, go to Nineveh, that great city, and proclaim to it the message that I tell you.

So Jonah set out and went to Nineveh, according to the word of the LORD.  Now Nineveh was an exceedingly large city, a three days’ walk across.  Jonah began to go into the city, going a day’s walk.  And he cried out,

Forty days more, and Nineveh shall be overthrown!

And the people of Nineveh believed God; they proclaimed a fast, and everyone, great and small, put on sackcloth.

When God say what they did, how they turned from their evil ways, God changed his mind about the calamity that he said he would bring upon them and he did not do it.

Psalm 62:6-14 (1979 Book of Common Prayer):

6 For God alone my soul in silence waits;

truly, my hope is in him.

7 He alone in my rock and my salvation,

my stronghold, so that I shall not be shaken.

8  In God is my safety and my honor;

God is my strong rock and my refuge.

9  Put your trust in him always, O people,

pour out your hearts before him, for God is our refuge.

10  Those of high degree are but a fleeting breath,

even those of low estate cannot be trusted.

11  On the scales they are lighter than a breath,

all of them together.

12  Put no trust in extortion;

in robbery take no empty pride;

though wealth increases, set not your heart upon it.

13  God has spoken once, twice have I heard it,

that power belongs to God.

14  Steadfast love is yours, O Lord,

for you repay everyone according to his deeds.

1 Corinthians 7:29-31 (New Revised Standard Version):

I mean, brothers and sisters, the appointed time has grown short; from now on, let even those who have wives be as though they had none, and those who mourn as though they were not mourning, and those who rejoice as though they were not rejoicing, and those who buy as though they had no possessions, and those who deal with this world as though they had no dealings with it.  For the present form of the world is passing away.

Mark 1:14-20 (New Revised Standard Version):

Now after John was arrested, Jesus came to Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God, and saying,

The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God has come near; repent, and believe in the good news.

As Jesus passed along the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting a net into the sea–for they were fishermen.  And Jesus said to them,

Follow me and I will make you fish for people.

And immediately they left their nets and followed him.  As he went a little farther, he saw James son of Zebedee and his brother John, who were in their boat mending the nets.  Immediately he called them; and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired him, and followed him.

The Collect:

Almighty God, whose Son our Savior Jesus Christ is the light of the world: Grant that your people, illumined by your Word and Sacraments, may shine with the radiance of Christ’s glory, that he may be known, worshipped, and obeyed to the ends of the earth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

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Some Related Posts:

Third Sunday after the Epiphany, Year A:

http://adventchristmasepiphany.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/third-sunday-after-the-epiphany-year-a/

Jonah 3:

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2011/04/27/week-of-proper-22-tuesday-year-1/

Mark 1:

http://adventchristmasepiphany.wordpress.com/2010/09/16/week-of-1-epiphany-monday-year-1/

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Rumi, or, as Persians and Afghanis call him, Jelaluddin Balkhi, lived from 1207 to 1273 C.E.  He was one of the great poets.  Professor Coleman Barks has translated many of Rumi’s works into English.  Among these is “A Basket of Fresh Bread,” part of which I quote here:

Stay bewildered in God,

and only that.

Those of you are scattered,

simplify your worrying lives.  There is one

righteousness:  Water the fruit trees,

and don’t water the thorns.  Be generous

to what nurtures the spirit and God’s luminous

reason-light.  Don’t honor what causes

dysentery and knotted-up tumors.

Don’t feed both sides of yourself equally.

The spirit and the body carry different loads

and require different attentions.

Too often

we put saddlebags of Jesus and let

the donkey run loose in the pasture.

Don’t make the body do

what the spirit does best, and don’t let a big load

on the spirit that the body could carry easily.

(Source = The Essential Rumi, Translated by Coleman Barks with John Moyne, A. J. Arberry, and Reynold Nicholson, HarperCollins, 1995; paperback, 1996; page 256)

Following God requires us to make changes.  The grace may be free to us, but it is not cheap.  We read in Jonah 3 that the prophet’s message found a receptive audience, but we discover in Jonah 4 that this fact disappointed Jonah.  He needed to lay aside his desire to see the people of Nineveh suffer for their sins.

As for Paul of Tarsus, all I can say is that I do not recall hearing this passage or the verse immediately before it read at a wedding, for good reason.

Yet those who marry will experience distress in life, and I would spare you that.–1 Corinthians 7:28b

Paul expected Jesus to return very soon, so marriage and other matters of daily life seemed relatively unimportant to him.  Two thousand years later, however, human relationships continue and Jesus has yet to return.  Some parts of the Bible are timeless; others are not.

And the Apostles?  Some of them left family businesses behind, and most of them died because they insisted on spreading the news of Jesus.  Nearly two thousand years later countless members of successive generations have known the mercies of Jesus because of what these men did.  I owe my faith in part to them.

Grace was not cheap for them.  This is the grace which grants repentance–literally turning around or changing one’s mind–and then forgiveness of sins.  Such grace scandalizes some of us from time to time, but we benefit from grace, too.  Consider this:  Somebody might find the grace God has extended to you scandalous.

Playing with Rumi’s word pictures, how often do we put the saddle bags on Jesus and let the donkey run loose in the pasture?  How often do we, perhaps out of ignorance, malnourish ourselves spiritually?  And how often do we water thorns?  I need to deal with these issues at least as much as do many other people.

The reality is that we–you and I–will not be the most effective ambassadors for Christ until, by grace, we begin to correct these bad habits and continue to replace them with good habits.  What we–you and I–do affects others in ways we cannot imagine.  Our influence, whether direct or indirect, is greater than we know.  So, by grace, may it be as positive as possible.

KRT

Published originally at ADVENT, CHRISTMAS, AND EPIPHANY DEVOTIONS BY KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR on June 11, 2011

Saints’ Days and Holy Days for January   Leave a comment

Snow in January

Image in the Public Domain

1 (EIGHTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Holy Name of Jesus
  • World Day of Peace

2 (NINTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Johann Konrad Wilhelm Loehe, Bavarian Lutheran Minister, and Coordinator of Domestic and Foreign Missions
  • Narcissus, Argeus, and Marcellinus of Tomi, Roman Martyrs, 320
  • Odilo of Cluny, Roman Catholic Abbot
  • Sabine Baring-Gould, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

3 (TENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Edward Caswall, Roman Catholic Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Edward Perronet, British Methodist Preacher
  • Gladys Aylward, Missionary in China and Taiwan
  • William Alfred Passavant, Sr., U.S. Lutheran Minister, Humanitarian, and Evangelist

4 (ELEVENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Elizabeth Ann Seton, Foundress of the American Sisters of Charity
  • Felix Manz, First Anabaptist Martyr, 1527
  • Gregory of Langres, Terticus of Langres, Gallus of Clermont, Gregory of Tours, Avitus I of Clermont, Magnericus of Trier, and Gaugericus, Roman Catholic Bishops
  • Johann Ludwig Freydt, German Moravian Composer and Educator

5 (TWELFTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Antonio Lotti, Roman Catholic Musician and Composer
  • Genoveva Torres Morales, Foundress of the Congregation of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Holy Angels
  • John Nepomucene Neumann, Roman Catholic Bishop of Philadelphia
  • Margaret Mackay, Scottish Hymn Writer

6 (EPIPHANY OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST)

7 (François Fénelon, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Cambrai)

  • Aldric of Le Mans, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • Angela of Foligno, Penitent and Humanitarian
  • Gaspar del Bufalo, Founder of the Missionaries of the Precious Blood
  • Lucian of Antioch, Roman Catholic Martyr, 312

8 (Thorfinn of Hamar, Roman Catholic Bishop)

  • A. J. Muste, Dutch-American Minister, Labor Activist, and Pacifist
  • Arcangelo Corelli, Roman Catholic Musician and Composer
  • Nicolaus Copernicus and Galileo Galilei, Scientists
  • Harriet Bedell, Episcopal Deaconess and Missionary

9 (Pepin of Landen, Itta of Metz, Their Relations, Amand, Austregisilus, and Sulpicius II of Bourges, Faithful Christians Across Generational Lines)

  • Emily Greene Balch, U.S. Quaker Sociologist, Economist, and Peace Activist
  • Julia Chester Emery, Upholder of Missions
  • Philip II of Moscow, Metropolitan of Moscow and All Russia, and Martyr, 1569
  • William Jones, Anglican Priest and Musician

10 (John the Good, Roman Catholic Bishop of Milan)

  • Allen William Chatfield, Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Translator
  • Ignatius Spencer, Anglican then Roman Catholic Priest and Apostle of Ecumenical Prayer; mentor of Elizabeth Prout, Foundress of the Sisters of the Cross and Passion
  • Mary Lundie Duncan, Scottish Presbyterian Hymn Writer
  • William Gay Ballantine, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Educator, Scholar, Poet, and Hymn Writer

11 (Theodosius the Cenobiarch, Roman Catholic Monk)

  • Charles William Everest, Episcopal Priest, Poet, and Hymn Writer
  • Miep Gies, Righteous Gentile
  • Paulinus II of Aquileia, Roman Catholic Patriarch of Aquileia
  • Richard Frederick Littledale, Anglican Priest and Translator of Hymns

12 (Benedict Biscop, Roman Catholic Abbot of Wearmouth)

  • Aelred of Hexham, Roman Catholic Abbot of Rievaulx
  • Anthony Mary Pucci, Roman Catholic Priest
  • Henry Alford, Anglican Priest, Biblical Scholar, Literary Translator, Hymn Writer, Hymn Translator, and Bible Translator
  • Marguerite Bourgeoys, Foundress of the Sisters of Notre Dame

13 (Hilary of Poitiers, Roman Catholic Bishop of Poitiers, “Athanasius of the West;” and Hymn Writer; mentor of Martin of Tours, Roman Catholic Bishop of Tours)

  • Christian Keimann, German Lutheran Hymn Writer
  • George Fox, Founder of the Religious Society of Friends
  • Mary Slessor, Scottish Presbyterian Missionary in West Africa
  • Samuel Preiswerk, Swiss Reformed Minister and Hymn Writer

14 (Macrina the Elder, Her Family, and Gregory of Nazianzus the Younger)

  • Caesarius of Arles, Roman Catholic Bishop; and Caesaria of Arles, Roman Catholic Abbess
  • Eivind Josef Berggrav, Lutheran Bishop of Oslo, Hymn Translator, and Leader of the Norwegian Resistance During World War II
  • Kristen Kvamme, Norwegian-American Hymn Writer and Translator
  • Sava I, Founder of the Serbian Orthodox Church and First Archbishop of Serbs

15 (Martin Luther King, Jr., Civil Rights Leader and Martyr, 1968)

  • Abby Kelley Foster and her husband, Stephen Symonds Foster, U.S. Quaker Abolitionists and Feminists
  • Bertha Paulssen, German-American Seminary Professor, Psychologist, and Sociologist
  • Gene M. Tucker, United Methodist Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • John Cosin, Anglican Bishop of Durham

16 (Roberto de Noboli, Roman Catholic Missionary in India)

  • Berard and His Companions, Roman Catholic Martyrs in Morocco, 1220
  • Edmund Hamilton Sears, U.S. Unitarian Minister, Hymn Writer, and Biblical Scholar
  • Gustave Weigel, U.S. Roman Catholic Priest and Ecumenist
  • Richard Meux Benson, Anglican Priest and Cofounder of the Society of St. John the Evangelist; Charles Chapman Grafton, Episcopal Priest, Cofounder of the Society of St. John the Evangelist, and Bishop of Fond du Lac; and Charles Gore, Anglican Bishop of Worcester, Birmingham, and Oxford; Founder of the Community of the Resurrection; Theologian; and Advocate for Social Justice and World Peace

17 (Antony of Egypt, Roman Catholic Abbot and Father of Western Monasticism)

  • James Woodrow, Southern Presbyterian Minister, Naturalist, and Alleged Heretic
  • Pachomius the Great, Founder of Christian Communal Monasticism
  • Rutherford Birchard Hayes, President of the United States of America
  • Thomas A. Dooley, U.S. Roman Catholic Physician and Humanitarian

18-25 (WEEK OF PRAYER FOR CHRISTIAN UNITY)

18 (CONFESSION OF SAINT PETER, APOSTLE)

19 (Sargent Shriver and Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Humanitarians)

  • Deicola and Gall, Roman Catholic Monks; and Othmar, Roman Catholic Abbot at Saint Gallen
  • Elmer G. Homrighausen, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Biblical Scholar, and Professor of Christian Education
  • Harold A. Bosley, United Methodist Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • Henry Twells, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

20 (Fabian, Bishop of Rome, and Martyr, 250)

  • Euthymius the Great and Theoctistus, Roman Catholic Abbots
  • Greville Phillimore, English Priest, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator
  • Harriet Auber, Anglican Hymn Writer
  • Richard Rolle, English Roman Catholic Spiritual Writer

21 (Mirocles of Milan and Epiphanius of Pavia, Roman Catholic Bishops)

  • Alban Roe and Thomas Reynolds, Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs, 1642
  • Edgar J. Goodspeed, U.S. Baptist Biblical Scholar and Translator
  • John Yi Yon-on, Roman Catholic Catechist and Martyr in Korea, 1867
  • W. Sibley Towner, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar

22 (John Julian, Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Hymnologist)

  • Alexander Men, Russian Orthodox Priest and Martyr, 1990
  • Ladislao Batthány-Strattmann, Austro-Hungarian Roman Catholic Physician and Philanthropist
  • Louise Cecilia Fleming, African-American Baptist Missionary and Physician
  • Vincent Pallotti, Founder of the Society for the Catholic Apostolate, the Union of Catholic Apostolate, and the Sisters of the Catholic Apostolate

23 (John the Almsgiver, Patriarch of Alexandria)

  • Charles Kingsley, Anglican Priest, Novelist, and Hymn Writer
  • Edward Grubb, English Quaker Author, Social Reformer, and Hymn Writer
  • James D. Smart, Canadian Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • Phillips Brooks, Episcopal Bishop of Massachusetts, and Hymn Writer

24 (Ordination of Florence Li-Tim-Oi, First Female Priest in the Anglican Communion)

  • George A. Buttrick, Anglo-American Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar; and his son, David G. Buttrick, U.S. Presbyterian then United Church of Christ Minister, Theologian, and Liturgist
  • Marie Poussepin, Foundress of the Dominican Sisters of Charity of the Presentation of the Virgin
  • Martyrs of Podlasie, 1874
  • Suranus of Sora, Roman Catholic Abbot and Martyr, 580

25 (CONVERSION OF SAINT PAUL, APOSTLE)

26 (TIMOTHY, TITUS, AND SILAS, COWORKERS OF SAINT PAUL THE APOSTLE)

27 (Jerome, Paula of Rome, Eustochium, Blaesilla, Marcella, and Lea of Rome)

  • Angela Merici, Foundress of the Company of Saint Ursula
  • Carolina Santocanale, Foundress of the Capuchin Sisters of the Immaculate of Lourdes
  • Caspar Neumann, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Pierre Batiffol, French Roman Catholic Priest, Historian, and Theologian

28 (Albert the Great and his pupil, Thomas Aquinas, Roman Catholic Theologians)

  • Daniel J. Simundson, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • Henry Augustine Collins, Anglican then Roman Catholic Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Joseph Barnby, Anglican Church Musician and Composer
  • Somerset Corry Lowry, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

29 (LYDIA, DORCAS, AND PHOEBE, COWORKERS OF SAINT PAUL THE APOSTLE)

30 (Lesslie Newbigin, English Reformed Missionary and Theologian)

  • Bathildas, Queen of France
  • Frederick Oakeley, Anglican then Roman Catholic Priest
  • Genesius I of Clermont and Praejectus of Clermont, Roman Catholic Bishops; and Amarin, Roman Catholic Abbot
  • Jacques Bunol, French Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1945

31 (Charles Frederick Mackenzie, Anglican Bishop of Nyasaland, and Martyr, 1862)

  • Anthony Bénézet, French-American Quaker Abolitionist
  • Lanza del Vasto, Founder of the Community of the Ark
  • Menno Simons, Mennonite Leader
  • Mary Evelyn “Mev” Puleo, U.S. Roman Catholic Photojournalist and Advocate for Social Justice

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast