Archive for the ‘January 7’ Category

Feast of Jean Kenyon Mackenzie (January 7)   Leave a comment

Above:  Jean Kenyon Mackenzie

Image in the Public Domain

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

JEAN KENYON MACKENZIE (JANUARY 6, 1874-SEPTEMBER 2, 1936)

U.S. Presbyterian Missionary in West Africa

Jean Kenyon Mackenzie comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Mackenzie, born in Elgin, Illinois, on January 6, 1874, was a daughter of Lydia Ann McLeod Mackenzie (1849-1938) and Presbyterian minister Robert Mackenzie (1845-1925).  Our saint studied at Van Ness Seminary, San Francisco, California (1888-1890).  She continued her studies at the Sorbonne (1891-1892) then the University of California at Berkeley (1895-1896).  Graduate studies at Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts, followed.

Above:  Kamerun and French Equatorial Africa, 1914

Image in the Public Domain

Mackenzie, under the auspices of the Board of Foreign Missions, Presbyterian Church in the U.S,A., served in West Africa from 1904 to 1913.  She ministered in Kamerun (a German colony) in 1904-1908 and again in 1909-1913.  Our saint served as a missionary in Gabon (a French colony) in 1908-1909.  Mackenzie worked in mission schools and with women.  She rejected racism and cultural imperialism.  Mackenzie understood the perils of destroying indigenous cultures.  She respected the people among whom she ministered; building on their culture was her tactic.

Health forced Mackenzie to return to the United States in 1914.  She, based in New York, New York devoted herself to writing.  She wrote articles for magazines, which included:

  1. The Atlantic Monthly,
  2. Women’s Work (a denominational publication),
  3. Overland Monthly, and
  4. The Perry Magazine.

Mackenzie’s published works were:

  1. Black Sheep:  Adventures in West Africa (1916),
  2. African Adventurers (1917),
  3. An African Trail (1917),
  4. The Story of a Fortunate Youth:  Chapters from the Biography of an Elderly Gentleman (1920),
  5. African Clearings (1924),
  6. The Black Pioneer (1924)–introduction only,
  7. The Venture:  Poems (1925),
  8. Friends of Africa (1928), and
  9. The Trader’s Wife (1930).

Our saint also traveled across the United States, speaking regarding foreign missions.  In 1923, she joined the Board of Foreign Missions.

Mackenzie did spend 18 months (1916-1918) in Kamerun.  Germany had lost that colony during World War I.  Our saint went back to Kamerun on official business of the Board of Foreign Missions.  She persuaded French authorities to permit the Presbyterian missionary work to continue in Kamerun.

Mackenzie died in New York, New York, on September 2, 1936.  She was 62 years old.

Posthumously published volumes of our saint’s writings included:

  1. Talking Woman (1939), and
  2. Glowing Ember:  Selections from the Writings of Jean Kenyon Mackenzie (1962), compiled by Katharine McAfee Parker.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 25, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF MICHAEL FARADAY, SCIENTIST

THE FEAST OF SAINT ANDREA BORDINO, ITALIAN ROMAN CATHOLIC LAY BROTHER

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARIA DEL TRÁNSITO DE JESÚS SACRADMENTADO, FOUNDER OF THE CONGREGATION OF THE FRANCISCAN TERTIARY MISSIONARIES OF ARGENTINA

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARIA TRONCATTI, ITALIAN ROMAN CATHOLIC NUN

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM JOHN COPELAND, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Almighty and everlasting God, we thank you for your servant Jean Kenyon Mackenzie,

whom you called to preach the Gospel to the people of Kamerun and Gabon.

Raise up in this and every land evangelists and heralds of your kingdom,

that your Church may proclaim the unsearchable riches of our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Isaiah 52:7-10

Psalm 96 or 96:1-7

Acts 1:1-9

Luke 10:1-9

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 716

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of Lanza del Vasto (January 7)   Leave a comment

Above:  Peace Sign

Image in the Public Domain

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

GIUSEPPE GIOVANNI LUIGI MARIA LANZA DI TRABIA-BRACIFORTE (SEPTEMBER 29, 1901-JANUARY 6, 1981)

Founder of the Community of the Ark

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Power can be used for any purpose, but nonviolence or the power of justice can serve only justice.

–Lanzo del Vasto; quoted in Robert Ellsberg, All Saints:  Daily Reflections on Saints, Prophets, and Witnesses for Our Time (1997), 15

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Lanzo del Vasto, from Italian nobility, devoted most of his adult life to working for peace, nonviolence, and reconciliation.  Giuseppe Giovanni Luigi Maria Lanza di Trabia-Braciforte, born in San Vito dei Normanni, Italy, on September 29, 1901, was a son of Don Luigi Lanza di Trabia-Braciforte and Anne-Marie Henriette Nauts-Oedenkoven.  Our saint, a student of philosophy, matriculated at the University of Pisa in 1922.  He, raised in a Roman Catholic family, remained within that tradition for the rest of his life.  Del Vasto worked with non-Roman Catholics, though.  He participated in the Indian independence movement and lived in Mohandas Gandhi’s ashram in 1936-1937.  Gandhi called our saint Shantidas, of “Servant of Peace.”  Shantidas spent the majority of this adult life traveling around the world.  He had a particular interest in sites of ongoing violent conflict.

The future must be a future of nonviolence, or else there will be no future.

–Lanza del Vasto

Toward that end, del Vasto protested (often via fasting) against evils.  These evils included torture (especially during the Algerian War), concentration camps, nuclear weapons, the global arms race, and wars.  Our saint became so famous for nonviolent protests against violence that Pope St. John XXIII gave him an advance copy of the encyclical Pacem in Terra in 1963.

In 1948 del Vasto and his wife, Chantelle, founded the first Community of the Ark, in France.  Families lived in intentional community, practiced common prayer, refused to commit violence or to exploit anyone, and became collectively self-sufficient.  It was a model from the Acts of the Apostles 4:32-37.  Del Vasto founded subsequent branches of the Community of the Ark.  He was doing that in Murcia, Spain, on January 6, 1981, when he died of a brain hemorrhage.  Our saint was 79 years old.

Lanza del Vasto took Biblical ethics seriously.  What would the world be like if more people did likewise?

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 2, 2019 COMMON ERA

LABOR DAY (U.S.A.)

THE FEAST OF F. CRAWFORD BURKITT, ANGLICAN SCHOLAR, HYMN WRITER, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF DAVID CHARLES, WELSH CALVINISTIC METHODIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF THE MARTYRS OF NEW GUINEA, 1942 AND 1943

THE FEAST OF SAINT WILLIAM OF ROSKILDE, ENGLISH-DANISH ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Almighty God, whose prophets taught us righteousness in the care of our poor:

By the guidance of your Holy Spirit, grant that we may do justice,

love mercy,

and walk humbly in your sight,

through Jesus Christ, our Judge and Redeemer, who lives and reigns

with you and the same Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Isaiah 55:11-56:1

Psalm 2:1-2, 10-12

Acts 14:14-17, 21-23

Mark 4:21-29

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 736

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of William Jones (January 7)   Leave a comment

Above:  Logo of The Church of England

Image in the Public Domain

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

WILLIAM JONES (JULY 30, 1726-JANUARY 6, 1800)

Anglican Priest and Musician

William Jones, born at Lowick, Northamptonshire, England, attended the Charterhouse, Surrey, and University College, Oxford, graduating from University College in 1749.  He led a series of congregations, including the parishes at Bethersdon, Pluckley, Paston, Nayland, and Hollingsbourne, where he died.  He wrote at length and in great detail on matters scientific, philosophical, and theological.  Jones was a Hutchinsonian, a partisan of John Hutchinson (1647-1737), who argued against Newtonian physics, including gravitational theory.  (Aside:  I prefer not to hold this against Jones, for nobody can be correct all the time.)  Jones, in reaction against the French Revolution founded The British Critic, a conservative church journal, in 1793.  That publication, which ceased to exist fifty years later, anticipated the Oxford Movement, for Jones was a High Churchman.

I am adding Jones to my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days because of his musical activities.  He wrote A Treatise on the Art of Music (1784), Ten Church Pieces for the Organ, With Four Anthems in Score (1789), and at least one hymn tune, “Newington.”  Jones understood correctly that music could and should play a crucial part in worship and in faith life.  Whatever he did in music, theology, politics, philosophy, or science, whether or not he was correct in objective matters, he did it all for God.  I honor that.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 26, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN BERCHMANS, ROMAN CATHOLIC SEMINARIAN

THE FEAST OF ISAAC WATTS, HYMN WRITER

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Almighty God, beautiful in majesty, majestic in holiness:

You have shown us the splendor of creation in the work of your servant William Jones.

Teach us to drive from the world all chaos and disorder, that our eyes may behold your glory,

and that at last everyone may know the inexhaustible richness of your new creation

in Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.  

Isaiah 28:5-6 or Hosea 14:5-8 or 2 Chronicles 20:20-21

Psalm 96

Philippians 4:8-9 or Ephesians 5:18b-20

Matthew 13:44-52

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 61

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Revised on November 21, 2016

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of St. Aldric of Le Mans (January 7)   Leave a comment

Above:  Northern France in 843

Image in the Public Domain

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

SAINT ALDRIC OF LE MANS (CIRCA 800-JANUARY 7, 856)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Le Mans

St. Aldric spent his youth in the court of the Frankish Emperor Charles the Great, a.k.a. Charlemagne, and Louis I the Pious/Debonair (reigned 814-840).  The saint, however, left that easy life to become a priest at the age of twenty-one years.  Yet Emperor Louis I recalled St. Aldric to the court.  There he remained until 832, nine years after his ordination, when the saint became Bishop of Le Mans, the post he held for the remaining twenty-four years of his life.  St. Aldric earned a reputation for his virtue and his civil spirit, the latter of which was evident from his efforts to build aqueducts, rebuild churches, restore monasteries and convents, and buy the freedom of captives.  Civil wars divided the Frankish kingdom after the death of Charlemagne.  The saint sided with Emperor Charles II the Bald (reigned 840-877), son of Louis I, so lost his see until Pope Gregory IV reinstated him.  St. Aldric also lost church lands due to the civil war, but regained them during his tenure.

Above all, the legacy of St. Aldric is one of active virtue which builds up the common good.  This is one way to love one’s neighbor as one loves oneself.  May we do this as God directs us.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FIRST SUNDAY OF ADVENT, YEAR B

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Heavenly Father, shepherd of your people,

we thank you for your servant

Saint Aldric of Le Mans,

who was faithful in the care and nurture of your flock.

We pray that, following his example and the teaching of his holy life,

we may by your grace attain our full maturity in Christ,

through the same Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3:14-21

John 21:15-17 or Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Revised from November 13, 2016

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Posted November 27, 2011 by neatnik2009 in January 7, Saints of 800-849, Saints of 850-899

Tagged with

Saints’ Days and Holy Days for January   Leave a comment

Snow in January

Image in the Public Domain

1 (EIGHTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Holy Name of Jesus
  • World Day of Peace

2 (NINTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Gaspar del Bufalo, Founder of the Missionaries of the Precious Blood
  • Johann Konrad Wilhelm Loehe, Bavarian Lutheran Minister, and Coordinator of Domestic and Foreign Missions
  • Narcissus of Tomi, Argeus of Tomi, and Marcellinus of Tomi, Roman Martyrs, 320
  • Odilo of Cluny, Roman Catholic Abbot
  • Sabine Baring-Gould, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

3 (TENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Edward Caswall, English Roman Catholic Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Edward Perronet, British Methodist Preacher
  • Elmer G. Homrighausen, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Biblical Scholar, and Professor of Christian Education
  • Gladys Aylward, Missionary in China and Taiwan
  • William Alfred Passavant, Sr., U.S. Lutheran Minister, Humanitarian, and Evangelist

4 (ELEVENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Angela of Foligno, Italian Roman Catholic Penitent and Humanitarian
  • Elizabeth Ann Seton, Founder of the American Sisters of Charity
  • Gregory of Langres, Terticus of Langres, Gallus of Clermont, Gregory of Tours, Avitus I of Clermont, Magnericus of Trier, and Gaugericus, Roman Catholic Bishops
  • Johann Ludwig Freydt, German Moravian Composer and Educator
  • Mary Lundie Duncan, Scottish Presbyterian Hymn Writer

5 (TWELFTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS)

  • Antonio Lotti, Italian Roman Catholic Musician and Composer
  • Felix Manz, First Anabaptist Martyr, 1527
  • Genoveva Torres Morales, Founder of the Congregation of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Holy Angels
  • John Nepomucene Neumann, Roman Catholic Bishop of Philadelphia
  • Margaret Mackay, Scottish Hymn Writer

6 (EPIPHANY OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST)

7 (François Fénelon, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Cambrai)

  • Aldric of Le Mans, Roman Catholic Bishop of Le Mans
  • Jean Kenyon Mackenzie, U.S. Presbyterian Missionary in West Africa
  • Lanza del Vasto, Founder of the Community of the Ark
  • Lucian of Antioch, Roman Catholic Martyr, 312
  • William Jones, Anglican Priest and Musician

8 (Thorfinn of Hamar, Roman Catholic Bishop)

  • A. J. Muste, Dutch-American Minister, Labor Activist, and Pacifist
  • Arcangelo Corelli, Italian Roman Catholic Musician and Composer
  • Nicolaus Copernicus and Galileo Galilei, Scientists
  • Harriet Bedell, Episcopal Deaconess and Missionary
  • Pepin of Landen, Itta of Metz, Their Relations, Amand, Austregisilus, and Sulpicius II of Bourges, Faithful Christians Across Generational Lines

9 (Julia Chester Emery, Upholder of Missions)

  • Emily Greene Balch, U.S. Quaker Sociologist, Economist, and Peace Activist
  • Gene M. Tucker, United Methodist Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • Johann Josef Ignaz von Döllinger, Dissident and Excommunicated German Roman Catholic Priest, Theologian, and Historian
  • Philip II of Moscow, Metropolitan of Moscow and All Russia, and Martyr, 1569
  • Thomas Curtis Clark, U.S. Disciples of Christ Evangelist, Poet, and Hymn Writer

10 (John the Good, Roman Catholic Bishop of Milan)

  • Allen William Chatfield, Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Translator
  • Louise Cecilia Fleming, African-American Baptist Missionary and Physician
  • María Dolores Rodríguez Sopeña y Ortega, Founder of the Centers of Instruction, the Association of the Sodality of the Virgin Mary, the Ladies of the Catechetical Institute, the Association of the Apostolic Laymen/the Sopeña Lay Movement, the Works of the Doctrines/the Center for the Workes, and the Social and Cultural Work Sopeña/the Sopeña Catechetical Institute
  • W. Sibley Towner, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • William Gay Ballantine, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Educator, Scholar, Poet, and Hymn Writer

11 (Theodosius the Cenobiarch, Roman Catholic Monk)

  • Charles William Everest, Episcopal Priest, Poet, and Hymn Writer
  • Ignatius Spencer, Anglican then Roman Catholic Priest and Apostle of Ecumenical Prayer; and his protégé, Elizabeth Prout, Founder of the Sisters of the Cross and Passion
  • Miep Gies, Righteous Gentile
  • Paulinus II of Aquileia, Roman Catholic Patriarch of Aquileia
  • Richard Frederick Littledale, Anglican Priest and Translator of Hymns

12 (Benedict Biscop, Roman Catholic Abbot of Wearmouth)

  • Aelred of Hexham, Roman Catholic Abbot of Rievaulx
  • Caesarius of Arles, Roman Catholic Bishop of Arles; and his sister, Caesaria of Arles, Roman Catholic Abbess
  • Anthony Mary Pucci, Italian Roman Catholic Priest
  • Henry Alford, Anglican Priest, Biblical Scholar, Literary Translator, Hymn Writer, Hymn Translator, and Bible Translator
  • Marguerite Bourgeoys, Founder of the Sisters of Notre Dame

13 (Hilary of Poitiers, Roman Catholic Bishop of Poitiers, “Athanasius of the West;” and Hymn Writer; and his protégé, Martin of Tours, Roman Catholic Bishop of Tours)

  • Christian Keimann, German Lutheran Hymn Writer
  • Edgar J. Goodspeed, U.S. Baptist Biblical Scholar and Translator
  • George Fox, Founder of the Religious Society of Friends
  • Mary Slessor, Scottish Presbyterian Missionary in West Africa
  • Samuel Preiswerk, Swiss Reformed Minister and Hymn Writer

14 (Macrina the Elder, Her Family, and Gregory of Nazianzus the Younger)

  • Abby Kelley Foster and her husband, Stephen Symonds Foster, U.S. Quaker Abolitionists and Feminists
  • Eivind Josef Berggrav, Lutheran Bishop of Oslo, Hymn Translator, and Leader of the Norwegian Resistance During World War II
  • Kristen Kvamme, Norwegian-American Hymn Writer and Translator
  • Richard Meux Benson, Anglican Priest and Co-Founder of the Society of Saint John the Evangelist; Charles Chapman Grafton, Episcopal Priest, Co-Founder of the Society of Saint John the Evangelist, and Bishop of Fond du Lac; and Charles Gore, Anglican Bishop of Worcester, Birmingham, and Oxford; Founder of the Community of the Resurrection; Theologian; and Advocate for Social Justice and World Peace
  • Sava I, Founder of the Serbian Orthodox Church and First Archbishop of Serbs

15 (Martin Luther King, Jr., Civil Rights Leader and Martyr, 1968)

  • Bertha Paulssen, German-American Seminary Professor, Psychologist, and Sociologist
  • Gustave Weigel, U.S. Roman Catholic Priest and Ecumenist
  • John Cosin, Anglican Bishop of Durham
  • John Marinus Versteeg, U.S. Methodist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Nikolaus Gross, German Roman Catholic Opponent of Nazism, and Martyr, 1945

16 (Roberto de Noboli, Roman Catholic Missionary in India)

  • Berard and His Companions, Roman Catholic Martyrs in Morocco, 1220
  • Edmund Hamilton Sears, U.S. Unitarian Minister, Hymn Writer, and Biblical Scholar
  • Edward Bunnett, Anglican Organist and Composer
  • Juana Maria Condesa Lluch, Founder of the Congregation of the Handmaids of the Immaculate Conception, Protectress of Workers
  • Timothy Richard Matthews, Anglican Priest, Organist, and Hymn Tune Composer

17 (Antony of Egypt, Roman Catholic Abbot and Father of Western Monasticism)

  • Deicola and Gall, Roman Catholic Monks; and Othmar, Roman Catholic Abbot at Saint Gallen
  • James Woodrow, Southern Presbyterian Minister, Naturalist, and Alleged Heretic
  • Pachomius the Great, Founder of Christian Communal Monasticism
  • Rutherford Birchard Hayes, President of the United States of America
  • Thomas A. Dooley, U.S. Roman Catholic Physician and Humanitarian

18-25 (WEEK OF PRAYER FOR CHRISTIAN UNITY)

18 (CONFESSION OF SAINT PETER, APOSTLE)

19 (Sargent Shriver his wife, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Humanitarians)

  • Alessandro Valignano, Italian Jesuit Missionary Priest in the Far East
  • Charles Winfred Douglas, Episcopal Priest, Liturgist, Musicologist, Linguist, Poet, Hymn Translator, and Arranger
  • Henry Twells, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

20 (Fabian, Bishop of Rome, and Martyr, 250)

  • Euthymius the Great and Theoctistus, Roman Catholic Abbots
  • Greville Phillimore, English Priest, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator
  • Harold A. Bosley, United Methodist Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • Harriet Auber, Anglican Hymn Writer
  • Richard Rolle, English Roman Catholic Spiritual Writer

21 (Mirocles of Milan and Epiphanius of Pavia, Roman Catholic Bishops)

  • Alban Roe and Thomas Reynolds, Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs, 1642
  • John Yi Yon-on, Roman Catholic Catechist and Martyr in Korea, 1867

22 (John Julian, Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Hymnologist)

  • Alexander Men, Russian Orthodox Priest and Martyr, 1990
  • Benjamin Lay, American Quaker Abolitionist
  • Ladislao Batthány-Strattmann, Austro-Hungarian Roman Catholic Physician and Philanthropist
  • Vincent Pallotti, Founder of the Society for the Catholic Apostolate, the Union of Catholic Apostolate, and the Sisters of the Catholic Apostolate

23 (John the Almsgiver, Patriarch of Alexandria)

  • Charles Kingsley, Anglican Priest, Novelist, and Hymn Writer
  • Edward Grubb, English Quaker Author, Social Reformer, and Hymn Writer
  • George A. Buttrick, Anglo-American Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar; and his son, David G. Buttrick, U.S. Presbyterian then United Church of Christ Minister, Theologian, and Liturgist
  • James D. Smart, Canadian Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • Phillips Brooks, Episcopal Bishop of Massachusetts, and Hymn Writer

24 (Ordination of Florence Li-Tim-Oi, First Female Priest in the Anglican Communion)

  • Bob Keeshan, Captain Kangaroo
  • Lindsay Bartholomew Longacre, U.S. Methodist Minister, Biblical Scholar, and Hymn Tune Composer
  • Marie Poussepin, Founder of the Dominican Sisters of Charity of the Presentation of the Virgin
  • Martyrs of Podlasie, 1874
  • Suranus of Sora, Roman Catholic Abbot and Martyr, 580

25 (CONVERSION OF SAINT PAUL, APOSTLE)

26 (TIMOTHY, TITUS, AND SILAS, CO-WORKERS OF SAINT PAUL THE APOSTLE)

27 (Jerome, Paula of Rome, Eustochium, Blaesilla, Marcella, and Lea of Rome)

  • Angela Merici, Founder of the Company of Saint Ursula
  • Carolina Santocanale, Founder of the Capuchin Sisters of the Immaculate of Lourdes
  • Caspar Neumann, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Mary Evelyn “Mev” Puleo, U.S. Roman Catholic Photojournalist and Advocate for Social Justice
  • Pierre Batiffol, French Roman Catholic Priest, Historian, and Theologian

28 (Albert the Great and his pupil, Thomas Aquinas; Roman Catholic Theologians)

  • Andrei Rublev, Russian Orthodox Icon Writer
  • Daniel J. Simundson, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • Henry Augustine Collins, Anglican then Roman Catholic Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Joseph Barnby, Anglican Church Musician and Composer
  • Somerset Corry Lowry, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

29 (LYDIA, DORCAS, AND PHOEBE, CO-WORKERS OF SAINT PAUL THE APOSTLE)

30 (Lesslie Newbigin, English Reformed Missionary and Theologian)

  • Bathildas, Queen of France
  • David Galván Bermúdez, Mexican Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr in Mexico, 1915
  • Frederick Oakeley, Anglican then Roman Catholic Priest
  • Genesius I of Clermont and Praejectus of Clermont, Roman Catholic Bishops; and Amarin, Roman Catholic Abbot
  • Jacques Bunol, French Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1945

31 (Charles Frederick Mackenzie, Anglican Bishop of Nyasaland, and Martyr, 1862)

  • Anthony Bénézet, French-American Quaker Abolitionist
  • Menno Simons, Mennonite Leader

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.

Feast of St. Lucian of Antioch (January 7)   Leave a comment

The Roman Empire in 125 C.E.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

SAINT LUCIAN OF ANTIOCH (CIRCA 240-312)

Priest, Scholar, Theological Teacher, and Martyr

Born in Samosata, Syria, St. Lucian became an orphan at the age of 12 years.  It is probable that his parents, Christians, were martyrs.

The saint grew to maturity and established the theological school at Antioch, Syria (now in Turkey), a center of early Christianity.  He translated the Old Testament from Hebrew into Greek.   Furthermore, the Lucian Recension, his translation of the Bible, was authoritative  and well-respected.  St. Jerome used it when translating the Vulgate.

St. Lucian followed in his parents’ footsteps and became a martyr.  He spent nine years in prison for being a Christian.  His reply to any question during interrogation was, “I am a Christian.”  Accounts of the details of his martyrdom disagree.  That is a minor point, however, for he gave his life for his faith.

I count myself fortunate to live in a nation-state with freedom of religion enshrined in its Constitution.  It is easy to take one’s faith casually in such a context as the one in which I live.  (I do not take my faith casually.)  But being a Christian was a great risk for St. Lucian and his fellow Christians during Roman Imperial and provincial persecutions.  And being a Christian remains risky for Christians in many nations today.  Ironically, many of those who persecute Christians do so in the name of God, as they understand God, or in the name of gods.  They think they are performing righteous deeds.  They are mistaken, of course.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 13, 2010 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ST. JOHN CHRYSOSTOM, BISHOP OF CONSTANTINOPLE

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Gracious God, in every age you have sent men and women who have given their lives in witness to your love and truth.  Inspire us with the memory of St. Lucian of Antioch, whose faithfulness led to the way of the cross, and give us courage to bear full witness with our lives to your Son’s victory over sin and death, for he lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, now and forever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 20:40-42

Psalm 5

Revelation 6:9-11

Mark 8:34-38

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 59

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Posted September 13, 2010 by neatnik2009 in January 7, Saints of 250-299, Saints of 300-349

Tagged with

Feast of Francois Fenelon (January 7)   1 comment

Above:  Francois Fenelon

Image in the Public Domain

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

FRANCOIS FENELON (AUGUST 6, 1651-JANUARY 7, 1715)

French Theologian and Archbishop of Cambrai

Francois Fenelon, born on August 6, 1651, came from a family that included bishops.  He received a classical education, including Greek, rhetoric, and philosophy.  Ordained a priest in 1675, Fenelon preached to Huguenots (French Calvinists)  in 1686-1687 and convinced the King Louis XIV to remove the outward signs of religious persecution.  This might not seem like much to occupants of religiously free nations today, but it was progress by the standards of the time.

In 1688 Fenelon advocated the education of girls and women in serious matters, including theology.  This constituted further evidence of his progressiveness, which manifested itself in other ways which caused difficulties for him in later years.

From 1689 to 1697, Fenelon tutored the dauphin (in this case, the father of Louis XV).  In 1696, toward the end of this assignment, Fenelon became Archbishop of Cambrai, a post he held until 1714.

One of Felelon’s acquaintances was one Jeanne-Marie Bouvier  de la Motte-Goyon, of simply Madame Guyon.  She advocated Quietism, which the Roman Catholic Church considered a heresy.  (It continues to do so.)  According to Quietism, the highest human perfection consists of a self-annihilation and absorption into the divine, especially in this life, making room for constant contemplation of God.  This, in turn, leads to a state at which the soul ceases to need prayers, hymns, and rituals.  This variety of mysticism threatened the hierarchical Catholic Church.  Fenelon’s defense of Madame Guyon prompted Louis XIV to remove his as tutor and to restrict him to the Archdiocese of Cambrai, despite the fact that Fenelon had backed down from his defense of Madame Guyon and her brand of Quietism.  (Guyon’s views led to her imprisonment from 1695 to 1703.)

In 1699 Fenelon took another risk.  He published The Adventures of Telemachus, the story of Telemachus, the son of Odysseus, and his tutor, Mentor,  actually Minerva, Goddess of Wisdom.  Mentor condemns war, luxury, and selfishness while praising fraternity and altruism.  Also, Mentor lashes out at mercantilism and high taxes on peasants.  The Adventures of Telemachus was an attack on the French monarchy.

As Archbishop, Fenelon tended faithfully to the people of his archdiocese, preaching on major feast days and focusing on the training of seminarians.  During the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714), when Spanish troops invaded the archdiocese, Fenelon opened his palace to refugees.

Archbishop Fenelon wrote condemnations of the heresy called Jansenism, a hybrid of Roman Catholicism and Calvinism.

Fenelon died on this day in 1715, shortly after resigning his archdiocese.

KRT

++++++++++

A Prayer by Archbishop Fenelon, from The Communion of Saints: Prayers of the Famous, edited by Horton Davies:

Lord, take my heart, for I cannot give it to you.  And when you have it, keep it, for I would not take it from you.  And save me in spite of myself, for Christ’s sake.  Amen.

++++++++++

Almighty God, you have raised up faithful bishops of your church, including your servant Francois Fenelon.  May the memory of his life be a source of joy for us and a bulwark of our faith, so that we may serve and confess your name before the world, through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3;14-21

Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

++++++++++

Revised on November 13, 2016

++++++++++