Archive for the ‘June 1’ Category

Feast of St. Justin Martyr (June 1)   Leave a comment

Above:  St. Justin Martyr

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT JUSTIN MARTYR (100/110-166/167)

Christian Apologist and Martyr

St. Justin Martyr was a major figure in early Christian history.  He, a student of Greek philosophy, pioneered the project of reconciling faith and reason.

St. Justin grew up a pagan.  He, born at Flavia Neopolis (formerly Shechem, Samaria; subsequently Nablus, in the West Bank of the River Jordan), spent years studying and mastering various schools of Greek philosophy.  Our saint sought meaning.  Circa 130 St. Justin found that meaning after a meeting with a Christian on the beach at Ephesus.  Our saint, while acknowledging the wisdom and truth present in Greek philosophy, came to regard Christianity as the sole rational religion and the only

safe and profitable philosophy.

One of the people he debated was one Trypho, a Jew, who argued that the New Testament distorts the Hebrew Bible.  St. Justin replied that the latter actually foreshadows the former.

Circa 150 St. Justin moved to Rome, where he founded a school and where he spent the rest of his life.  Our saint wrote influential texts, some of which have survived.  St. Justin addressed the First Apology (circa 155) to the Emperor Antoninus Pius (reigned 138-161) and his adopted sons, Marcus Aurelius (reigned 161-180) and Lucius Verus.  Our saint refuted allegations of immorality against the Church, argued for the reasonableness of Christianity, and described contemporary Baptismal and Eucharistic rites and theology.  The bases of the Dialogue with Trypho were encounters at Ephesus.  The audience for the Second Apology (161) was the Roman Senate.

St. Justin, orthodox according to the standards of the time, became something of a heretic post mortem, as did other Ante-Nicene Fathers, notably Origen and St. Clement of Alexandria.  St. Justin, for example, concluded that God the Son is subordinate to God the Father, a position antithetical to subsequent orthodox developments in Trinitarian theology.

Circa 165 St. Justin debated the Cynic philosopher Crescens publicly; this led to the demise of our saint and six of his pupils.  Apparently Crescens was an unsavory character; St. Justin accused him of being immoral and ignorant.  The revenge of Crescens proved St. Justin’s first point.  The Cynic philosopher denounced St. Justin and six of his pupils as Christians.  (The authorities could have arrested St. Justin for years, if they had been of a mind to do; he was living openly and writing apologia to imperial officials, after all.)  When St. Justin and the others refused to sacrifice to the gods, they endured scourging then met their martyrdom via beheading.

These martyrs had the courage of their convictions.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 16, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT PACHOMIUS THE GREAT, FOUNDER OF CHRISTIAN COMMUNAL MONASTICISM

THE FEAST OF SAINT ROBERTO DE NOBOLI, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY IN INDIA

THE FEAST OF GREVILLE PHILLIMORE, ENGLISH PRIEST, HYMN WRITER, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF RICHARD MEUX BENSON, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND COFOUNDER OF THE SOCIETY OF SAINT JOHN THE EVANGELIST; CHARLES CHAPMAN GRAFTON, EPISCOPAL PRIEST, COFOUNDER OF THE SOCIETY OF SAINT JOHN THE EVANGELIST, AND BISHOP OF FOND DU LAC; AND CHARLES GORE, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF WORCESTER, BIRMINGHAM, AND OXFORD; FOUNDER OF THE COMMUNITY OF THE RESURRECTION; THEOLOGIAN; AND ADVOCATE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE AND WORLD PEACE

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O God, who has given your Church wisdom and revealed deep and secret things:

Grant that we, like your servant Justin and in union with his prayers,

may find your truth an abiding refuge all the days of our lives;

through Jesus Christ, who with the Holy Spirit lives and reigns

with you, one God, in glory everlasting.  Amen.

A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  A Calendar of Commemorations (2016)

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Almighty and everlasting God, you found your martyr Justin wandering from teacher to teacher,

seeking the true God, and you revealed to him the sublime wisdom of your eternal Word:

Grant that all who seek you, or a deeper knowledge of you, may find and be found by you;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with

you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 7:7-9

Psalm 16:5-11

1 Corinthians 1:18-25

John 12:44-50

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 401

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Feast of Samuel Stennett and John Howard (June 1)   2 comments

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Above:  Statue of John Howard, Bedford, England, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Publisher = Detroit Publishing Company

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-08007

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SAMUEL STENNETT (JUNE 1, CIRCA 1727-AUGUST 24, 1795)

English Seventh-Day Baptist Minister and Hymn Writer

Friend and Pastor of

JOHN HOWARD (SEPTEMBER 2, CIRCA 1726-JANUARY 20, 1790)

English Humanitarian

I commence the Eta (2014; Zeta phase was 2013) phase of my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days by adding two Seventh-Day Baptists to the honor roll of faith.  One might wonder what they would have thought of that.  But they have earned it, for, regardless of any and all doctrinal differences I have with them, they did follow Christ and use their influence to improve the lives of others.

Samuel Stennett (c. 1727-1795) came from a line of Seventh-Day Baptist ministers which went back at least as far back as his great-grandfather.  His grandfather, Joseph Stennett (1663-July 11, 1713), son of the Reverend Edward Stennett, was not only a preacher but a hymn writer and a classical scholar.  Grandfather Joseph knew French, Hebrew, and Italian.  He abridged the works of Plato (in Volume I and Volume II) and published baptismal hymns.  His complete works fill a five volume set:  I, II, III, IV, and V.  And one of his hymns, “Lord, At Thy Table We Behold,” found a place in Christian Worship, the 1941 hymnal of the American Baptist Churches and the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).

Samuel’s father–Joseph’s son–was also named Joseph.  Joseph (son of Joseph and father of Samuel) was also a minister.  When Samuel was ten years old, father Joseph became pastor of the Baptist church at Little Wild Street, London, Lincoln’s Inn Field, London.  In 1748 Samuel became his father’s assistant.  Ten years later, Samuel, aged thirty years, succeeded his father as pastor there.

Samuel wrote much; his collected works fill a three volume set:  I, II, and III.  He, like his grandfather, wrote hymns.  Thirty-eight of those hymns appeared in Dr. John Rippon’s A Selection of Hymns from the Best Authors, Intended as an Appendix to Dr. Watts’ Psalms and Hymns (1787).  One of Samuel’s hymns, from A Collection of Hymns for Public, Social, and Domestic Worship (1847), the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, follows:

On Jordan’s stormy banks I stand,

And cast a wishful eye

To Canaan’s fair and happy land,

Where my possessions lie.

—–

O the transporting, rapt’rous scene,

That rises to my sight!

Sweet fields arrayed in living green,

And rivers of delight!

—–

There gen’rous fruits that never fail

On trees immortal grow:

There rocks, and hills, and brooks, and vales,

With milk and honey flow.

—–

All o’er those wide-extended plains

Shrines one eternal day;

There God the Son for ever reigns,

And scatters night away.

—–

No chilling winds nor pois’nous breath

Can reach that healthful shore;

Sickness and sorrow, pain and death,

Are felt and fear’d no more.

—–

When shall I reach that happy place,

And be for ever blest?

When shall I see my Father’s face,

And in his bosom rest?

—–

Fill’d with delight, my raptured soul

Would here no longer stay!

Though Jordan’s waves around me roll,

Fearless I’d launch away.

Another hymn, “How Charming is the Place,” is here.

Samuel, who received his Doctor of Divinity degree from the University of Aberdeen in 1763, was a good friend of King George III.  The pastor used his political influence to lobby for religious freedom.

Another good friend of the Reverend Samuel Stennett was a parishioner, John Howard (1726-1790).  Howard, son of a wealthy merchant, received his inheritance in 1742 and started his travels in Europe.  In 1756 he was en route to Lisbon, Portugal, to help with the disaster relief after the recent earthquake, fire, and tsunami when pirates seized the ship on which he was traveling.  Howard, allowed to return home eventually, moved on with his life.

Howard’s main cause was penal reform.  In 1773 he became the high sheriff of Bedordshire.  The new high sheriff found jail conditions appalling.  The jailers and guards were not on salary, so they depended on fees charged to prisoners.  Thus many acquitted people were still incarcerated because they could not pay the fees.  Also, the states of some of the buildings made them health hazards, and health care for prisoners was not always available.  Howard was primarily responsible for two penal reform laws the House of Commons passed in 1774.  The first freed people in open court and abolished the discharge fee.  The second required health care for prisoners and maintenance of facilities.  Howard even paid for the printing and distribution of these laws.  Yet enforcement lagged in places.

Howard affirmed the rehabilitation of prisoners.  Thus he published The State of Prisons in England and Wales, With Preliminary Observations, and an Account of Some Foreign Prisons (1777) and its 1780 Appendix after traveling to research the subject in 1775 and 1776.  These works were related to the 1779 act of Parliament which provided for prisoner reform and rehabilitation via solitary confinement, regulated labor, and religious instruction.

Howard devoted his final years to public health.  The control of contagious diseases mattered to him.  Thus he traveled to conduct more research, publishing An Account of the Principal Lazarettos in Europe (1789).  His death came at Kherson, Russia, during a visit to a military hospital.  Howard contracted the camp fever there.

Samuel Stennett and John Howard understood that they had obligations to help others.  They acted on that knowledge and helped “the least of these.”

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 1, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE EIGHTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS:  THE FEAST OF THE HOLY NAME OF JESUS

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served,

and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Feast of St. Simeon of Syracuse (June 1)   Leave a comment

 

Above:  A Map of Europe in 1000 CE

SAINT SIMEON OF SYRACUSE (DIED 1035)

Roman Catholic Monk

I found the name of St. Simeon Syracuse in the 1980 edition of the Dictionary of Saints, by John J. Delaney.  I purchased the book on October 3, 2011, at the public library sale in Winder, Georgia.  This volume has already led me to pursue many paths of research.  And more will follow.

The lifespan of St. Simeon places him close to the formal rupture between Eastern Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism.  This fact becomes important for understanding something which Saints.SQPN.com says about him:

One of the last great figures linking the [Catholic] West with the Orthodox East.

Actually, the website said “Orthodox West” and “Orthodox East,” but “Catholic West” makes more sense.

St. Simeon of Syracuse, a native of Syracuse, Sicily, educated at Constantinople, then the Byzantine imperial capital, became a hermit along the River Jordan after making a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.  After some time he became a monk at Bethlehem then, for two years or so, a hermit attached to the monastery at Mt. Sinai.  Then he began a dangerous mission to Normandy.

Now I combine hagiography with royal history according to encyclopedias and other reference works I consulted.  Richard II, Duke of Normandy, called Richard the Good (reigned 996-1026), had promised to make a donation to Mt. Sinai monastery.  (Richard II, by the way, was a nephew of Hugh Capet, King of France (reigned 987-996), founder of the Capetian line, which remained uninterrupted until 1792.  I wonder how good Richard II was, for he crushed at least one peasant uprising.)  Anyhow, Richard II had not paid the money yet.  So St. Simeon went to collect it.

As I mentioned, this was a perilous journey.  Pirates attacked the ship in the eastern Mediterranean Sea and killed everyone aboard except St. Simeon.  He swam ashore, where he met one Cosmas, who traveled with him from Antioch to Belgrade (where they spent time in custody) then to southern France.  There Cosmas died.  St. Simeon arrived at the ducal court to discover that Richard II had died and that the new duke refused to pay the promised money.

Who was this duke?  No source I have consulted is certain.  Richard II had two sons who succeeded him.  The first was Richard III (reigned 1026-1027).  After he died,  Robert I (reigned 1027-1035) governed.  Robert had two nicknames:  the Magnificent and the Devil, the latter of which referred to a rumor that he had killed his way to the throne.  Given the length of each reign, Robert I was more likely to be the duke who refused to pay the money.  He was also the father (by a mistress) of his successor, William II the Bastard (reigned 1035-1087).  William is more more famous as the Duke of Normandy who claimed his right (established via his aunt Emma’s marriage into the English royal family) to the English throne in 1066.  So William II the Bastard became William I the Conqueror (reigned 1066-1087).

Back to our regularly scheduled program….

St. Simeon, in western Europe, met Poppo, Archbishop of Trier.  They made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land then returned to Trier, where the saint lived his remaining years a hermit under the direction of the Abbot of St. Martin’s Monastery.  St. Simeon died of natural causes in 1035.

The Roman Catholic Church canonized him in 1042.  This was a formal process consistent with canonizations since 993.  Canonizations prior to 993 had been informal affairs.

This has been an adventure story which has overlapped with dynastic histories.  But what does it have to do with anything important, one might ask?  One purpose of reading hagiographies is to learn about church history.  This is a laudable goal.  (I am a history buff; of course I claim that this is a laudable goal.)  But there is another purpose:  to learn valuable moral lessons.  St. Simeon of Syracuse traveled far and wide for God.  He placed himself at great risk for this purpose.  And he preferred to be alone with God, based on his chosen lifestyle.  We all need solitude with God to feed our souls, so may we never starve ourselves with too much activity.  And, regardless of where we ought to go for God–and at what risks–may we obey that call.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 25, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARK THE EVANGELIST, MARTYR

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O God, whose blessed Son became poor that we through his poverty might be rich:

Deliver us from an ordinate love of this world, that we, inspired by the devotion of your servant Saint Simeon of Syracuse,

may serve you with singleness of heart, and attain to the riches of the age to come;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,

one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Song of Songs 8:6-7

Psalm 34

Philippians 3:7-15

Luke 12:33-37 or 9:57-62

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 722

Feast of St. Pamphilus of Caesarea and His Companions (June 1)   Leave a comment

Above:  Ruins of the Roman Aqueduct at Caesarea Maritima

SAINT PAMPHILUS OF CAESAREA (DIED 309)

Bible Scholar and Translator; Martyr

One of the pleasures of reading then writing about notable saints is feeding the intellectual side of my nature.  My blogging functions as a creative outlet.  Another associated pleasure is learning about long-dead people I would have liked to know.  Among these historical heroes was St. Pamphilus of Caesaria, born to a wealthy Beirut family in the late 200s.  The saint studied at the great catechetical school of Alexandria, Egypt.  There he came under the influence of Pierius, a follower of Origen, another person I admire greatly.  St. Pamphilus, who also taught at that school in time, became a priest at Caesarea Maritima.

St. Pamphilus was a great scholar.  During his lifetime the saint had a reputation for being well-informed and maintaining a large private library, one invaluable for research by himself and others.  Known as the leading Bible scholar of his time, St. Pamphilus taught, mentored, and befriended Eusebius of Caesarea, the great historian of early Christianity.  Eusebius described St. Pamphilus as

a most admirable man of our times and the glory of the church at Caesarea, whose illustrious deeds we have set forth….

Ecclesiastical History, Book 8, Chapter 13, (6), translated by C. F. Cruse

and as

that dearest of my friends and associates, a man who for every virtue was the most illustrious martyr of our times.

Ecclesiastical History, The Book of Martyrs, Chapter 7

St. Pamphilus, who lived simply and gave his wealth to the poor, also translated the Bible.  His library has long since ceased to exist, unfortunately, as has the biography Eusebius wrote about him.

On another note, the saint and Eusebius did collaborate on the Apology for Origen.  I approve of this, for Origen needed defenders; he had many detractors.

As Eusebius has informed us, the life of St. Pamphilus ended in martyrdom.  The scholarly saint refused to sacrifice to pagan gods at Caesarea Maritima in 308.  Imprisoned for over a year, he died by beheading in 309.  Also beheaded were St. Paul of Jamnia and St. Valens of Jerusalem, a deacon.  Their crime was to be a Christian.  The man who ordered their executions was Firmilian, the local Roman governor.  On that day he also oversaw the crucifixion of St. Theodolus of Caesarea, a former servant of his who was a Christian.  It was a bloody day at Caesarea Maritima.  One St. Porphyrius of Caesarea, a student of St. Pamphilius, requested the opportunity to bury his mentor’s body.  For this alleged offense Firmilian ordered him tortured then burned to death.  An on-looker named St. Seleucus of Cappadocia applauded the faith of St. Porphyrius.  So Firmilian had this man beheaded.

Such violence flows from fear.  One might wonder why Romans persecuted those Gentiles who refused to sacrifice to pagan gods and those who sympathized with such dissidents.  These violent acts flowed from the assumption that the gods, whose existence most Mediterranean people of the time affirmed, would bless the empire and cause it to prosper so long as people sacrificed to them.  The Romans, being relatively tolerant of religious differences, exempted Jews from this civic duty.  Yet this tolerance did not extend to dissident Gentiles, depending on who was governor in a particular region at a certain time.  Most persecutions were regional, and empire-wide persecutions were rare.  As the empire faced foreign and domestic turmoil, cracking down on these Gentiles who refused to sacrifice to imaginary deities seemed rational, from a certain point of view.  These Christians constituted a real threat to the health of the empire, persecutors thought.

May we know then remember that those who engage in persecution might not think of themselves as villains.  They can probably rationalize their actions to themselves and others.  That said, not every dispute in a church-state relationship indicates persecution; may we not “cry wolf.”  And may we not persecute either.

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Dear God of life, who has endured us with the blessings of the intellect,

we thank you for the scholarship of Saint Pamphilus of Caesarea,

whose output influenced his contemporaries and his successors in the Christian faith positively.

We thank you also for his faith and that of his fellow martyrs,

Saint Paul of Jamnia,

Saint Valens of Jerusalem,

Saint Theodolus of Caesarea,

Saint Porphyrius of Caesarea,

and Saint Seleucus of Cappadocia,

each of whom took up his cross and followed you.

We mourn the violence which leads to martyrdom

while rejoicing that such violence has failed to crush Christianity.

May such violence cease,

tolerance increase,

and love of you flourish.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Wisdom of Solomon 3:1-9

Psalm 22

2 Timothy 4:6-8

Mark 8:31-38

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 24, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE MARTYRS OF ARMENIA

THE FEAST OF JOHANN WALTER, COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF THE SEVEN MARTYRS OF THE MELANESIAN BROTHERHOOD

THE FEAST OF TOYOHIKO KAGAWA, TEACHER AND EVANGELIST

Saints’ Days and Holy Days for June   Leave a comment

Honeysuckles

Image in the Public Domain

 

1 (Justin Martyr, Christian Apologist and Martyr)

  • Pamphilus of Caesarea, Bible Scholar and Translator; and His Companions, Martyrs
  • Samuel Stennett, English Seventh-Day Baptist Minister and Hymn Writer; and John Howard, English Humanitarian
  • Simeon of Syracuse, Roman Catholic Monk

2 (Blandina and Her Companions, the Martyrs of Lyons, 177)

  • Anders Christensen Arrebo, “The Father of Danish Poetry”
  • Margaret Elizabeth Sangster, Hymn Writer, Novelist, and Devotional Writer
  • Stephen of Sweden, Roman Catholic Missionary, Bishop, and Martyr

3 (John XXIII, Bishop of Rome)

  • Christian Gottfried Geisler and Johann Chrstian Geisler, Silesian Moravian Organists and Composers; and Johannes Herbst, German-American Organist, Composer, and Bishop
  • Frances Ridley Havergal, English Hymn Writer and Composer
  • Will Campbell, Agent of Reconciliation

4 (Christoph Homburg, German Lutheran Hymn Writer)

  • Francis Caracciolo, Cofounder of the Minor Clerks Regular
  • Ole T. (Sanden) Arneson, U.S. Norwegian Lutheran Hymn Translator
  • Stanislaw Kostka Starowieyski, Roman Catholic Martyr

5 (Dorotheus of Tyre, Bishop of Tyre, and Martyr)

6 (Franklin Clark Fry, President of The United Lutheran Church in America and the Lutheran Church in America)

  • Claude of Besançon, Roman Catholic Priest, Monk, Abbot, and Bishop
  • Henry James Buckoll, Author and Translator of Hymns
  • William Kethe, Presbyterian Hymn Writer

7 (Matthew Talbot, Recovering Alcoholic in Dublin, Ireland)

  • Anthony Mary Gianelli, Founder of the Missionaries of Saint Alphonsus Liguori and the Sisters of Mary dell’Orto
  • Frederick Lucian Hosmer, U.S. Unitarian Hymn Writer
  • Seattle, First Nations Chief, War Leader, and Diplomat

8 (Clara Luper, Witness for Civil Rights)

  • Gerard Manley Hopkins, English Roman Catholic Poet and Jesuit Priest
  • Henry Downton, Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator
  • Roland Allen, Anglican Priest, Missionary, and Mission Strategist

9 (Columba of Iona, Roman Catholic Missionary and Abbot)

  • Giovanni Maria Boccardo, Founder of the Poor Sisters of Saint Cajetan/Gaetano; and his brother, Luigi Boccardo, Apostle of Merciful Love
  • Jose de Anchieta, Apostle of Brazil and Father of Brazilian National Literature
  • Thomas Joseph Potter, Roman Catholic Priest, Poet, and Hymn Writer

10 (James of Nisibis; Bishop; and Ephrem of Edessa, “The Harp of the Holy Spirit”)

  • Getulius, Amantius, Caeraelis, and Primitivus, Martyrs at Tivoli, 120; and Symphorosa of Tivoli, Martyr
  • Landericus of Paris, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • Thor Martin Johnson, U.S. Moravian Conductor and Music Director

11 (BARNABAS THE APOSTLE, COWORKER OF SAINT PAUL THE APOSTLE)

12 (Edwin Paxton Hood, English Congregationalist Minister, Philanthropist, and Hymn Writer)

  • Christian David Jaeschke, German Moravian Organist and Composer; and his grandson, Henri Marc Hermann Voldemar Voullaire, Moravian Composer and Minister
  • Enmegahbowh, Episcopal Priest and Missionary to the Ojibwa Nation
  • Joseph Dacre Carlyle, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

13 (Milton Smith Littlefield, Jr., U.S. Presbyterian and Congregationalist Minister, Hymn Writer, and Hymnal Editor)

  • Sigismund von Birken, German Lutheran Hymn Writer
  • William Cullen Bryant, U.S. Poet, Journalist, and Hymn Writer

14 (Charles Augustus Briggs, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Episcopal Priest, Biblical Scholar, and Alleged Heretic; and his daughter, Emilie Grace Briggs, Biblical Scholar and “Heretic’s Daughter”)

  • Methodius I of Constantinople, Defender of Icons and Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople; and Joseph the Hymnographer, Defender of Icons and the “Sweet-Voiced Nightingale of the Church”
  • William Hiram Foulkes, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

15 (John Ellerton, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer and Translator)

  • Carl Heinrich von Bogatsky, Hungarian-German Lutheran Hymn Writer
  • Dorothy Frances Blomfield Gurney, English Poet and Hymn Writer
  • Landelinus of Vaux, Roman Catholic Abbot; Aubert of Cambrai, Roman Catholic Bishop; Ursmar of Lobbes, Roman Catholic Abbot and Missionary Bishop; and Domitian, Hadelin, and Dodo of Lobbes, Roman Catholic Monks

16 (George Berkeley, Irish Anglican Bishop and Philosopher; and Joseph Butler, Anglican Bishop and Theologian)

  • John Francis Regis, Roman Catholic Priest
  • Norman Macleod, Scottish Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer; and his cousin, John Macleod, Scottish Presbyterian Minister, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer
  • Rufus Jones, U.S. Quaker Theologian and Cofounder of the American Friends Service Committee

17 (Edith Boyle MacAlister, English Novelist and Hymn Writer)

  • Emily de Vialar, Founder of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Apparition
  • Jane Cross Bell Simpson, Scottish Presbyterian Poet and Hymn Writer
  • Teresa and Mafalda of Portugal, Princesses, Queens, and Nuns; and Sanchia of Portugal, Princess and Nun

18 (Adolphus Nelson, Swedish-American Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer)

  • Johann Franck, Heinrich Held, and Simon Dach, German Lutheran Hymn Writers
  • Richard Massie, Hymn Translator
  • William Bingham Tappan, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Poet, and Hymn Writer

19 (James Arthur MacKinnon, Canadian Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr in the Dominican Republic)

  • Alfred Ramsey, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Hymn Translator
  • Charitie Lees Smith Bancroft de Chenez, Hymn Writer
  • William Pierson Merrill, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Social Reformer, and Hymn Writer

20 (Joseph Augustus Seiss, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Liturgist, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator)

  • Charles Coffin, Roman Catholic Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Hans Adolf Brorson, Danish Lutheran Bishop, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator
  • Johann Friedrich Hertzog, German Lutheran Hymn Writer

21 (Aloysius Gonzaga, Jesuit)

  • Bernard Adam Grube, German-American Minister, Missionary, Composer, and Musician
  • Carl Bernhard Garve, German Moravian Minister, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer
  • John Jones and John Rigby, Roman Catholic Martyrs

22 (Alban, First British Martyr)

  • Desiderius Erasmus, Dutch Roman Catholic Priest, Biblical and Classical Scholar, and Controversialist; John Fisher, English Roman Catholic Classical Scholar, Bishop of Rochester, Cardinal, and Martyr; and Thomas More, English Roman Catholic Classical Scholar, Jurist, Theologian, Controversialist, and Martyr
  • Gerhard Gieschen, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Hymn Translator
  • Paulinus of Nola, Roman Catholic Bishop of Nola

23 (John Johns, English Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer)

  • Heinrich Gottlob Gutter, German-American Instrument Maker, Repairman, and Merchant
  • Nicetas of Remesiana, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • Wilhelm Heinrich Wauer, German Moravian Composer and Musician

24 (NATIVITY OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST)

25 (William of Vercelli, Roman Catholic Hermit; and John of Matera, Roman Catholic Abbot)

  • Domingo Henares de Zafira Cubero, Roman Catholic Bishop of Phunhay, Vietnam, and Martyr; Phanxicô Đo Van Chieu, Vietnamese Roman Catholic Catechist and Martyr; and Clemente Ignacio Delgado Cebrián, Roman Catholic Bishop and Martyr in Vietnam

26 (Isabel Florence Hapgood, U.S. Journalist, Translator, and Ecumenist)

  • Andrea Giacinto Longhin, Roman Catholic Bishop of Treviso
  • Philip Doddridge, English Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Virgil Michel, U.S. Roman Catholic Monk, Academic, and Pioneer of Liturgical Renewal

27 (Cornelius Hill, Oneida Chief and Episcopal Priest)

  • Hugh Thomson Kerr, Sr., U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Liturgist; and his son, Hugh Thomson Kerr, Jr., U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Scholar, and Theologian
  • James Moffatt, Scottish Presbyterian Minister, Scholar, and Bible Translator
  • John the Georgian, Abbot; and Euthymius of Athos and George of the Black Mountain, Abbots and Translators

28 (John Gerard, English Jesuit Priest; and Mary Ward, Foundress of the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary)

  • Plutarch, Marcella, Potanominaena, and Basilides of Alexandria, Martyrs
  • Teresa Maria Masters, Foundress of the Institute of the Sisters of the Holy Face
  • William and John Mundy, English Composers and Musicians

29 (PETER AND PAUL, APOSTLES AND MARTYRS)

30 (Johann Olaf Wallin, Archbishop of Uppsala and Hymn Writer)

  • Gennaro Maria Sarnelli, Italian Roman Catholic Priest and Missionary to the Vulnerable and Exploited People of Naples
  • Heinrich Lonas, German Moravian Organist, Composer, and Liturgist
  • Philip Powel, English Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr

Floating

  • First Book of Common Prayer, 1549

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.