Archive for the ‘June 3’ Category

Feast of St. John XXIII (June 3)   9 comments

Above:  St. John XXIII

Image in the Public Domain

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

SAINT JOHN XXIII (NOVEMBER 25, 1881-JUNE 3, 1963)

Bishop of Rome

Born Angelo Giovanni Roncalli

Lutheran feast day = June 3

Episcopal and Canadian Anglican feast day = June 4

Roman Catholic feast day = October 11 (formerly June 3)

Pope St. John XXIII began the process of opening the proverbial windows of the Roman Catholic Church and became perhaps the most influential Vicar of Christ in the twentieth century.  He was certainly a breath of fresh air.

Angelo Giovanni Roncalli came from humble origins.  He, born at Sotto il Monte, near Bergamo, Italy, on November 25, 1881, was the third of thirteen children.  His parents were peasant farmers.  Our saint studied at the village school then at Bergamo.  Next he attended the St. Apollinare Institute, Rome, on scholarship, from 1901 to 1904, graduating with the Doctor of Theology degree.

The young priest became an academic and a scholar.  From 1905 to 1914 Roncalli served as the Secretary to the Bishop of Bergamo.  During that time our saint also lectured in ecclesiastical history at the diocesan seminary.  He, drafted during World War I, was a hospital orderly then a chaplain in the Italian army.  In 1921 Pope Benedict XV named Roncalli the national director of the Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith.  Our saint found time to write historical monographs on various ecclesiastical topics, including a multi-volume work on St. Charles Borromeo (1538-1584), completed in 1958.

From 1925 to 1953 Roncalli was a diplomat.  He served as the apostolic visitor (1925-1931) then apostolic delegate (1931-1934) to Bulgaria then the apostolic delegate (1934-1944) to Turkey and Greece.  In Eastern Europe our saint established friendly relations with Eastern Orthodox bishops.  During the Nazi occupation of Greece (1941-1944) Roncalli worked to prevent the deportation of Jews.  As the nuncio to France (1944-1953) our saint had to deal with the political aftermath of World War II.  When the government of Charles de Gaulle wanted the Church to remove thirty-three bishops suspected of being Vichy collaborators, he dismissed only three.  The nuncio found most of the evidence against the thirty-three bishops unsatisfactory.  He told de Gaulle:

What I have here is mostly newspaper clippings and gossip.  These are not evidence in any system of justice.  If you can’t supply something more concrete, I am afraid that any action against these men would be discreditable both to me and the justice of France.

–Quoted in Orlando Strunk, Jr., In Faith and Love (Nashville, TN:  Graded Press, 1968), pages 90-91

Our saint also supported the worker-priest movement, of which the Vatican was dubious.  Roncalli, elevated to the College of Cardinals on June 12, 1953, became the Patriarch of Venice three days later.

Pope Pius XII died in early October 1958.  At the end of the month the College of Cardinals elected Roncalli to fill the vacancy.  The 78-year-old Supreme Pontiff was no caretaker Pope.  At his enthronement St. John XXIII announced that he, most of all, wanted to be a good shepherd.  During the next few years our saint made changes in the Roman Catholic Church.  He expanded the College of Cardinals from a maximum of 70 members and expanded it to 87, while increasing its international diversity, by the end of 1962.  St. John XXIII started the revision of canon law and opened the first session of the Second Vatican Council (Vatican II, 1962-1965), which Pope Paul VI completed.  Our saint also revived the papal custom of visiting prisoners or patients at Christmas.  Furthermore, St. John XXIII, not a prisoner of the Vatican, as some of his predecessors had been, earned the respect of John F. Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev, both of whom he advised to act cautiously during the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Some of St. John XXIII’s most impressive achievements were in the field of ecumenism.  In 1960 he established the Secretariat for Christian Unity.  That year he also made history by receiving Geoffrey Fisher, the Archbishop of Canterbury.  The following year our saint sent official greetings to Athenagoras I, the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, and dispatched observers to the gathering of the World Council of Churches.  The Supreme Pontiff, who greeted Jewish visitors by saying,

I am Joseph, your brother!,

excised from the liturgy for Good Friday the words offensive to Jews.

Good Pope John, aged 81 years, died on June 3, 1963.

Pope John Paul II declared our saint a Venerable in 1999 then a Blessed the following year.  Pope Francis canonized Roncalli in 2013.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 16, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT PACHOMIUS THE GREAT, FOUNDER OF CHRISTIAN COMMUNAL MONASTICISM

THE FEAST OF SAINT ROBERTO DE NOBOLI, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY IN INDIA

THE FEAST OF GREVILLE PHILLIMORE, ENGLISH PRIEST, HYMN WRITER, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF RICHARD MEUX BENSON, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND COFOUNDER OF THE SOCIETY OF SAINT JOHN THE EVANGELIST; CHARLES CHAPMAN GRAFTON, EPISCOPAL PRIEST, COFOUNDER OF THE SOCIETY OF SAINT JOHN THE EVANGELIST, AND BISHOP OF FOND DU LAC; AND CHARLES GORE, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF WORCESTER, BIRMINGHAM, AND OXFORD; FOUNDER OF THE COMMUNITY OF THE RESURRECTION; THEOLOGIAN; AND ADVOCATE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE AND WORLD PEACE

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Lord of all truth and peace, you raised up your bishop John to be a servant

of the servants of God and gave him wisdom to call for the work of renewing your Church:

Grant that, following his example, we may reach out to other Christians to clasp them with the love of your Son,

and labor throughout the nations of the world to kindle a desire for justice and peace;

through Jesus Christ, who is alive and reigns with you

and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Joel 2:26-29

Psalm 50:1-6

1 Peter 5:1-4

John 21:15-17

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 407

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Advertisements

Feast of Christian Gottfried Geisler, Johann Christian Geisler, and Johannes Herbst (June 3)   1 comment

Moravian Logo

Above:  The Moravian Logo 

Scanned from the cover of a reprint of J. E. Hutton’s History of the Moravian Church

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CHRISTIAN GOTTFRIED GEISLER (OCTOBER 10, 1730-JUNE 3, 1810)

Silesian Moravian Organist and Composer

brother of

JOHANN CHRISTIAN GEISLER (MARCH 13, 1729-APRIL 14, 1815)

Silesian Moravian Organist and Composer

teacher of

JOHANNES HERBST (JULY 23, 1735-JANUARY 15, 1812)

German-American Organist, Composer, and Bishop

One reason human beings are on the Earth is to influence each other positively–to encourage and to build each other up.  Two ways of tracking such activity are to look for familial relationships and ways teachers have mentored students.  Both methods apply to this post.

We begin with two brothers from Toppliwoda, Silesia (now Cieplowody, Poland).  Johann Christian Geisler (1729-1815) and Christian Gottfried Geisler (1730-1810) served God and the Moravian Church in a variety of capacities, most notably as organists and composers.  They learned music and various instruments when quite young.  That early reality set the courses of their lives.

Christian Gottfried, the less famous brother, was a dedicated and capable servant of God.  He joined the Moravian Church under the influence of his parents and older brother.  Christian Gottfried was so devoted to music at an early age that he preferred not to pursue any “useful” trades, as others referred to them.  (Really, is music useless?)  The younger brother became a church musician and composer.  He lived at Neusalz (now Nowa Sal, Poland), then at Herrnhaag, in Hesse.  From there he went to Zeist, The Netherlands, where, for three years, he worked in the kitchen at the Single Brethren’s House.  A brief stint as an organist in London, England, followed; he disliked the climate.  Thus, in 1757, Christian Gottfried returned to Zeist, where he served as a school and church organist for over half a century.  And there, in 1765, he married Catharina Brandenburg.  He died at Zeist on June 3, 1810.

Christian Gottfried composed music and copied the works of others for his collection.  Among his original works were twenty-three sonatas for four translations and at least ten anthems for church use.

Johann Christian, the more famous brother, was a capable musician at an early age.  He learned to play the harp and the organ.  Then, in 1745, at sixteen years of age, he helped to form a trombone choir for the Moravian congregation at Gnadenfrei, Silesia.  He became a minister, the pastor the several European congregations, and the husband of a harpist.  He also knew Christian Gregor (1723-1801), the “Father of Moravian Music,” and other prominent Moravian Church musicians.  Johann Christian, who also served on the Unity Elders Council of the Unitas Fratrum, died at Berthelsdorf, Saxony, near Herrnhut, on April 14, 1815.

Johann Christian, who started composing in 1760, wrote about three hundred works.  His anthems included “Thus Says the Lord–We Can Never Describe It,” “O Dear Saviour, My Redeemer,” “The Fruit of the Spirit is Love…,” and “Glory to Him.”

Johann Christian Geisler taught Johannes Herbst (1735-1812).  Herbst entered the world at Kempten, Bavaria, on July 23, 1735.  His parents, unable to raise him, sent him to live in the home of his uncle at Hirschberg, Silesia (now Jelenia Gora, Poland).  The uncle sent him to the boarding school at Herrnhut.   Thus our saint found a new family–the Moravian Church–in 1748.  At Herrnhut Herbst apprenticed as a clock maker.  Later he lived in various places in Europe (mainly in Germany) until 1786.  For a time he served as the treasurer of the global Moravian Church.  Our saint, an ordained minister, married Rosine Louise Clemens at Herrnhut on June 30, 1768.  In Europe he started copying music, thereby starting an impressive collection of more than five hundred works.  That collection has become an essential resource for students and scholars of early Moravian music and a microcosm of early American Moravian music.

In 1786 the Herbsts emigrated to the United States of America.  His first ministerial posting in America was at Lancaster, Pennsylvania.  He transferred to Lititz, Pennsylvania, five years later.  Two decades later, on May 12, 1811, Herbst became a bishop.  Just two days later he left Lititz to begin pastoral duties at Salem, North Carolina.  There he died seven months later, on January 15, 1812.  He was sixty-six years old.

Herbst left a legacy of original church music–more than a hundred anthems and two hundred sacred songs, to be precise.  His anthems included “Seek Ye His Countenance in All Places,” “None Among Us Lives to Self,” “Lift Up Your Hearts, Rejoicing,” and “One Alone is Your Master.”

Herbst and the Geisler brothers served that master well.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 6, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE EPIPHANY

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring

Christian Gottfried Geisler, Johann Christian Geisler, and Johannes Herbst

and all those who with music have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior,

who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns,

one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 728

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of Frances Ridley Havergal (June 3)   1 comment

frances_ridley_havergal

 

Image Source = Steven R. Cook, M. Div.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

FRANCES RIDLEY HAVERGAL (DECEMBER 14, 1836-JUNE 3, 1879)

English Hymn Writer and Composer

Hymn tunes are interesting.  Certain ones remain in our memories yet often without the tune name attached.  Consider, for example, the tune “Hermas.”  I associate it with words–“Welcome, Happy Morning….,” an Easter hymn.  Yet I had not paid attention to the tune name or composer until I began to prepare this post.  Now I know that Frances Ridley Havergal composed that tune.

Our saint was the youngest child of Anglican priest William Henry Havergal (1793-1870), who emphasized high-quality church music.  He composed anthems, services, psalm tunes, and hymn tunes.  He also reformed metrical psalmody.

That background suited our Frances Ridley Havergal well.  She, a skilled linguist, knew French and German well.  She, familiar with Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, read the Bible in its original languages.  Her excellent memory enabled her to memorize the entirety of the Psalms, Isaiah, the Minor Prophets, and the New Testament.  And the prolific writer began to compose texts at age seven.  I have added some of her hymns to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  Here is an Ascension hymn Havergal wrote:

Golden harps are sounding,

Angel voices ring,

Pearly gates are opened,

Opened for the King:

Christ, the King of Glory,

Jesus, King of Love,

Is gone up in triumph

To His throne above.

Refrain:

All His work is ended,

Joyfully we sing;

Jesus hath ascended:

Glory to our King!

—–

He who came to save us,

He who bled and died,

Now is crowned with glory

At His Father’s side;

Never more to suffer,

Never more to die,

Jesus, King of Glory,

Is gone up on high.

Refrain

—–

Pleading for His children,

In that blessed place,

Calling them to glory,

Sending them His grace;

His bright home preparing,

Faithful ones, for you;

Jesus ever liveth,

Ever loveth too.

Refrain

And here is a New Year-themed hymn:

Standing at the portal

Of the opening year,

Words of comfort meet us,

Hushing every fear;

Spoken through then silence

By our Father’s voice,

Tender, strong, and faithful,

Making us rejoice.

Refrain:

Onward, then, and fear not,

Children of the day;

For His word shall never,

Never pass away.

—–

For the year before us,

O what rich supplies!

For the poor and needy

Living streams shall rise;

For the faint and feeble

Perfect strength be found.

Refrain

—–

He will never fail us,

He will not forsake;

His eternal covenant

He will never break;

Resting on His promise,

What have we to fear?

God is all-sufficient

For the coming year.

Refrain

Our saint understood that she composed hymn texts in cooperation with God.  Perhaps she was correct.

Her health always fragile, Havergal died at age forty-two.  Memorial volumes and posthumous anthologies followed.  Here is a partial list:

  1. Frances Ridley Havergal:  The Last Week (1879);
  2. Memorials of Frances Ridley Havergal (1880);
  3. Under His Shadow:  The Last Poems of Frances Ridley Havergal (1880);
  4. The Poetical Works (1880);
  5. Poems (1881);
  6. Swiss Letters and Alpine Poems (1882)
  7. Bells Across the Skies (1883);
  8. Loyal Responses, or Daily Melodies for the King’s Minstrels (1883);
  9. Frances Ridley Havergal:  A Full Sketch of Her life (1884);
  10. Letters by the Late Frances Ridley Havergal (1885);
  11. Life Chords, Comprising Zenith, Loyal Responses, and Other Poems (1885);
  12. Sunbeams from the Golden Land (1886);
  13. Royal Bounty (1888), and
  14. Golden Thoughts from the Life and Works of Frances Ridley Havergal (1895).

Yet perhaps the best memorial to Frances Ridley Havergal is a hymnal which contains many of her texts.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 4, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE ELEVENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS

THE FEAST OF FELIX MANZ, FIRST ANABAPTIST MARTYR

THE FEAST OF SAINT ELIZABETH SETON, FOUNDER OF THE AMERICAN SISTERS OF CHARITY

THE FEAST OF SAINTS GREGORY OF LANGRES, TERTICUS OF LANGRES, GALLUS OF CLERMONT, GREGORY OF TOURS, AVITUS I OF CLERMONT, MAGNERICUS OF TRIER, AND GAUGERICUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS

THE FEAST OF JOHANN KONRAD WILHELM LOEHE, LUTHERAN PASTOR

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Frances Ridley Havergal and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

Feast of Will Campbell (June 3)   1 comment

egerton-000-willcampbellportrati-lg

Above:  Will Campbell, 1975

Photographer = Al Clayton

Image Source = http://southernspaces.org/2013/reverend-will-d-campbell-southern-racial-reconciler

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

WILL DAVIS CAMPBELL (JULY 18, 1924-JUNE 3, 2013)

Agent of Reconciliation

I have decided to do something different in this post.  Instead of writing a standard brief biography and adding some reflections, I offer almost nothing but reflections.  Others have explained his life well and in a detailed way.  Some links follow:

http://www.firstthings.com/onthesquare/2013/06/will-d-campbell-bootleg-baptist

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/05/us/will-d-campbell-maverick-minister-and-civil-rights-stalwart-dies-at-88.html?pagewanted%253Dall&_r=0

http://southernspaces.org/2013/reverend-will-d-campbell-southern-racial-reconciler

http://www.religionnews.com/2013/06/05/feisty-civil-rights-activist-will-campbell-dies-at-88/

http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2013/jul/19/terry-mattingly-remembering-will-campbell/

And here is an interview transcript:  http://library.wustl.edu/units/spec/filmandmedia/collections/henry-hampton-collection/eyes1/campbell.htm.

MY REFLECTIONS

Campbell, a “bootleg Baptist,” loved God and his fellow human beings.  He was married to the same woman for sixty-six years.  He advocated for civil rights for African Americans and homosexuals, opposed the death penalty as well as abortion on demand, criticized the wars in Vietnam and Iraq, and ministered to Klansmen.  He understood that everyone–from the redneck to the radical–was his neighbor.  He acted accordingly.

One of Campbell’s quotes stands out in my mind as a profound theological statement:

We’re all bastards, but God loves us anyway.

We are all bastards; that is true, but we are bastards who bear the image of God.  And, through grace, there is hope for all of us.  None of us is beyond the possibility of redemption.  Campbell understood that well.

Often we–even we who consider ourselves enlightened and liberal-minded–become comfortable with our prejudices.  We need someone to challenge them and to shake us out of our moral complacency.  It is easy to be charitable with those who are similar to us in ways we consider important, but Christ calls us to do far more than that.  As Campbell understood, Jesus calls us to love both rednecks and radicals, both those who deny civil rights to others and those to whom they deny them, and both the sympathetic and the unsympathetic, for all of them are our neighbors.

Will Campbell set the bar very high.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 3, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE TENTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS

THE FEAST OF EDWARD CASWALL, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDWARD PERRONET, BRITISH METHODIST PREACHER

THE FEAST OF SAINT GENEVIEVE, PROPHET

THE FEAST OF GLADYS AYLWARD, ANGLICAN MISSIONARY TO CHINA

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served,

and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom

the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Saints’ Days and Holy Days for June   Leave a comment

Honeysuckles

Image in the Public Domain

 

1 (Justin Martyr, Christian Apologist and Martyr)

  • Pamphilus of Caesarea, Bible Scholar and Translator; and His Companions, Martyrs
  • Samuel Stennett, English Seventh-Day Baptist Minister and Hymn Writer; and John Howard, English Humanitarian
  • Simeon of Syracuse, Roman Catholic Monk

2 (Blandina and Her Companions, the Martyrs of Lyons, 177)

  • Anders Christensen Arrebo, “The Father of Danish Poetry”
  • Margaret Elizabeth Sangster, Hymn Writer, Novelist, and Devotional Writer
  • Stephen of Sweden, Roman Catholic Missionary, Bishop, and Martyr

3 (John XXIII, Bishop of Rome)

  • Christian Gottfried Geisler and Johann Chrstian Geisler, Silesian Moravian Organists and Composers; and Johannes Herbst, German-American Organist, Composer, and Bishop
  • Frances Ridley Havergal, English Hymn Writer and Composer
  • Will Campbell, Agent of Reconciliation

4 (Christoph Homburg, German Lutheran Hymn Writer)

  • Francis Caracciolo, Cofounder of the Minor Clerks Regular
  • Ole T. (Sanden) Arneson, U.S. Norwegian Lutheran Hymn Translator
  • Stanislaw Kostka Starowieyski, Roman Catholic Martyr

5 (Dorotheus of Tyre, Bishop of Tyre, and Martyr)

6 (Franklin Clark Fry, President of The United Lutheran Church in America and the Lutheran Church in America)

  • Claude of Besançon, Roman Catholic Priest, Monk, Abbot, and Bishop
  • Henry James Buckoll, Author and Translator of Hymns
  • William Kethe, Presbyterian Hymn Writer

7 (Matthew Talbot, Recovering Alcoholic in Dublin, Ireland)

  • Anthony Mary Gianelli, Founder of the Missionaries of Saint Alphonsus Liguori and the Sisters of Mary dell’Orto
  • Frederick Lucian Hosmer, U.S. Unitarian Hymn Writer
  • Seattle, First Nations Chief, War Leader, and Diplomat

8 (Clara Luper, Witness for Civil Rights)

  • Gerard Manley Hopkins, English Roman Catholic Poet and Jesuit Priest
  • Henry Downton, Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator
  • Roland Allen, Anglican Priest, Missionary, and Mission Strategist

9 (Columba of Iona, Roman Catholic Missionary and Abbot)

  • Giovanni Maria Boccardo, Founder of the Poor Sisters of Saint Cajetan/Gaetano; and his brother, Luigi Boccardo, Apostle of Merciful Love
  • Jose de Anchieta, Apostle of Brazil and Father of Brazilian National Literature
  • Thomas Joseph Potter, Roman Catholic Priest, Poet, and Hymn Writer

10 (James of Nisibis; Bishop; and Ephrem of Edessa, “The Harp of the Holy Spirit”)

  • Getulius, Amantius, Caeraelis, and Primitivus, Martyrs at Tivoli, 120; and Symphorosa of Tivoli, Martyr
  • Landericus of Paris, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • Thor Martin Johnson, U.S. Moravian Conductor and Music Director

11 (BARNABAS THE APOSTLE, COWORKER OF SAINT PAUL THE APOSTLE)

12 (Edwin Paxton Hood, English Congregationalist Minister, Philanthropist, and Hymn Writer)

  • Christian David Jaeschke, German Moravian Organist and Composer; and his grandson, Henri Marc Hermann Voldemar Voullaire, Moravian Composer and Minister
  • Enmegahbowh, Episcopal Priest and Missionary to the Ojibwa Nation
  • Joseph Dacre Carlyle, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

13 (Milton Smith Littlefield, Jr., U.S. Presbyterian and Congregationalist Minister, Hymn Writer, and Hymnal Editor)

  • Sigismund von Birken, German Lutheran Hymn Writer
  • William Cullen Bryant, U.S. Poet, Journalist, and Hymn Writer

14 (Charles Augustus Briggs, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Episcopal Priest, Biblical Scholar, and Alleged Heretic; and his daughter, Emilie Grace Briggs, Biblical Scholar and “Heretic’s Daughter”)

  • Methodius I of Constantinople, Defender of Icons and Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople; and Joseph the Hymnographer, Defender of Icons and the “Sweet-Voiced Nightingale of the Church”
  • William Hiram Foulkes, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

15 (John Ellerton, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer and Translator)

  • Carl Heinrich von Bogatsky, Hungarian-German Lutheran Hymn Writer
  • Dorothy Frances Blomfield Gurney, English Poet and Hymn Writer
  • Landelinus of Vaux, Roman Catholic Abbot; Aubert of Cambrai, Roman Catholic Bishop; Ursmar of Lobbes, Roman Catholic Abbot and Missionary Bishop; and Domitian, Hadelin, and Dodo of Lobbes, Roman Catholic Monks

16 (George Berkeley, Irish Anglican Bishop and Philosopher; and Joseph Butler, Anglican Bishop and Theologian)

  • John Francis Regis, Roman Catholic Priest
  • Norman Macleod, Scottish Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer; and his cousin, John Macleod, Scottish Presbyterian Minister, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer
  • Rufus Jones, U.S. Quaker Theologian and Cofounder of the American Friends Service Committee

17 (Edith Boyle MacAlister, English Novelist and Hymn Writer)

  • Emily de Vialar, Founder of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Apparition
  • Jane Cross Bell Simpson, Scottish Presbyterian Poet and Hymn Writer
  • Teresa and Mafalda of Portugal, Princesses, Queens, and Nuns; and Sanchia of Portugal, Princess and Nun

18 (Adolphus Nelson, Swedish-American Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer)

  • Johann Franck, Heinrich Held, and Simon Dach, German Lutheran Hymn Writers
  • Richard Massie, Hymn Translator
  • William Bingham Tappan, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Poet, and Hymn Writer

19 (James Arthur MacKinnon, Canadian Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr in the Dominican Republic)

  • Alfred Ramsey, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Hymn Translator
  • Charitie Lees Smith Bancroft de Chenez, Hymn Writer
  • William Pierson Merrill, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Social Reformer, and Hymn Writer

20 (Joseph Augustus Seiss, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Liturgist, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator)

  • Charles Coffin, Roman Catholic Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Hans Adolf Brorson, Danish Lutheran Bishop, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator
  • Johann Friedrich Hertzog, German Lutheran Hymn Writer

21 (Aloysius Gonzaga, Jesuit)

  • Bernard Adam Grube, German-American Minister, Missionary, Composer, and Musician
  • Carl Bernhard Garve, German Moravian Minister, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer
  • John Jones and John Rigby, Roman Catholic Martyrs

22 (Alban, First British Martyr)

  • Desiderius Erasmus, Dutch Roman Catholic Priest, Biblical and Classical Scholar, and Controversialist; John Fisher, English Roman Catholic Classical Scholar, Bishop of Rochester, Cardinal, and Martyr; and Thomas More, English Roman Catholic Classical Scholar, Jurist, Theologian, Controversialist, and Martyr
  • Gerhard Gieschen, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Hymn Translator
  • Paulinus of Nola, Roman Catholic Bishop of Nola

23 (John Johns, English Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer)

  • Heinrich Gottlob Gutter, German-American Instrument Maker, Repairman, and Merchant
  • Nicetas of Remesiana, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • Wilhelm Heinrich Wauer, German Moravian Composer and Musician

24 (NATIVITY OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST)

25 (William of Vercelli, Roman Catholic Hermit; and John of Matera, Roman Catholic Abbot)

  • Domingo Henares de Zafira Cubero, Roman Catholic Bishop of Phunhay, Vietnam, and Martyr; Phanxicô Đo Van Chieu, Vietnamese Roman Catholic Catechist and Martyr; and Clemente Ignacio Delgado Cebrián, Roman Catholic Bishop and Martyr in Vietnam

26 (Isabel Florence Hapgood, U.S. Journalist, Translator, and Ecumenist)

  • Andrea Giacinto Longhin, Roman Catholic Bishop of Treviso
  • Philip Doddridge, English Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Virgil Michel, U.S. Roman Catholic Monk, Academic, and Pioneer of Liturgical Renewal

27 (Cornelius Hill, Oneida Chief and Episcopal Priest)

  • Hugh Thomson Kerr, Sr., U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Liturgist; and his son, Hugh Thomson Kerr, Jr., U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Scholar, and Theologian
  • James Moffatt, Scottish Presbyterian Minister, Scholar, and Bible Translator
  • John the Georgian, Abbot; and Euthymius of Athos and George of the Black Mountain, Abbots and Translators

28 (John Gerard, English Jesuit Priest; and Mary Ward, Foundress of the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary)

  • Plutarch, Marcella, Potanominaena, and Basilides of Alexandria, Martyrs
  • Teresa Maria Masters, Foundress of the Institute of the Sisters of the Holy Face
  • William and John Mundy, English Composers and Musicians

29 (PETER AND PAUL, APOSTLES AND MARTYRS)

30 (Johann Olaf Wallin, Archbishop of Uppsala and Hymn Writer)

  • Gennaro Maria Sarnelli, Italian Roman Catholic Priest and Missionary to the Vulnerable and Exploited People of Naples
  • Heinrich Lonas, German Moravian Organist, Composer, and Liturgist
  • Philip Powel, English Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr

Floating

  • First Book of Common Prayer, 1549

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.