Archive for the ‘March 7’ Category

Feast of Sts. Perpetua, Felicity, and Their Companions (March 7)   Leave a comment

perpetua_felicitas_revocatus_saturninus_and_secundulus_menologion_of_basil_ii

Above:  The Martyrdom of Sts. Perpetua, Felicity, and Their Companions

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT VIBIA PERPETUA (BORN IN 181)

SAINT FELICITAS, ALSO KNOWN AS SAINT FELICITY

SAINT REVOCATUS

SAINT CATHAGINIANS SECUNDULUS

SAINT SATURNINUS

Martyred at Carthage on March 7, 203

According to some accounts, Roman Emperor Septimius Severus (lived 145-211; reigned 193-211) forbade Christians to convert people.  Historian J. G. Davies, author of The Early Christian Church (1965), considered this story dubious, however.  Septimius Severus did, however, certainly preside over a vigorous persecution of Christianity in northern Africa in the early 200s.  Among the martyrs from that period were the five saints featured in this post.

These martyrs were Christian catechumen at Carthage.  Vibia Perpetua was a widow with an infant son.  Felicitas and Revocatus were her slaves.  Cathaginians Secundulus and Saturninus rounded out the group.  These five saints refused to make a mandatory sacrifice to the divinity of the emperor.  In so doing they made themselves enemies of the state, which considered such sacrifices essential to the well-being of the empire.  Perpetua refused pleas from her father to spare her life.  He went on to raise her son.  Felicitas, eight months pregnant at the time of her arrest, gave birth to a daughter, whom she entrusted to Christian friends.

Our saints died at Carthage on March 7, 203.  Animals killed Revocatus, Cathaginians Secundulus, and Saturninus in the arena.  Perpetua and Felicitas died by the sword in the same arena.  The soldier who executed Perpetua failed the first time; he pierced her throat between bones.  Then she guided the sword to its destination.

Perhaps so great a woman could not else have been slain had she herself not so willed it.

The Passion of SS. Perpetua and Felicity

The stories of these saints’ martyrdom has encouraged the faith of Christians since 203.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 9, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS PEPIN OF LANDEN, ITTA OF METZ, THEIR RELATIONS, AMAND, AUSTREGISILUS, AND SULPICIUS II OF BOURGES, FAITHFUL CHRISTIANS ACROSS GENERATIONAL LINES

THE FEAST OF SAINT ANTHONY MARY PUCCI, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST

THE FEAST OF JULIA CHESTER EMERY, UPHOLDER OF MISSIONS

THE FEAST OF SAINT PHILIP II OF MOSCOW, METROPOLITAN OF MOSCOW AND ALL RUSSIA AND MARTYR

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O God, the King of Saints, who strengthened your servants

Perpetua, Felicity, and their companions to make a good confession

and to encourage one another in the time of trial:

Grant that we who cherish their blessed memory may be encouraged by their prayers

to share their pure and steadfast faith and win with them the palm of victory;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you

and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Daniel 6:10-16

Psalm 124

Hebrews 10:32-39

Matthew 24:9-14

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 263

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Feast of Jim McGown (March 7)   2 comments

James Hewitt McGown

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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JAMES HEWITT MCGOWN (MARCH 30, 1946-MARCH 7, 2013)

Humanitarian

Seldom do I have the privilege of meeting, much less knowing, people I add to the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.  This time, however, I write about someone I not only knew but considered a friend.

Jim McGown was born in Lynbrook, New York, in 1946, son of Hewitt Roe McGown and Jeanette McDougal McGown.  He grew up in Garden City, on Long Island.  Jim, a graduate of McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, came to Athens, Georgia, for the first time as a naval officer in training at the U.S. Navy Supply Corps School.  During that stint he met Jane Foster, whom he eventually married in September 1972.  They settled in Jane’s hometown, Athens, the following year, remaining there and moving into their most long-lasting home in 1987.

Jim and Jane raised two sons—Evan Hewitt McGown and Todd Foster McGown Elihu.  Their home was a site of much love, personal warmth, and generosity of spirit.  Jim lived long enough to see Todd marry and welcome visits by his daughter-in-law, Baraka, and his granddaughter, Akasha.

As Jane described Jim to me recently, “God’s love smiled through him.”  Thus Jim loved Christ in his neighbors near to home and far away.  He helped to found the Athens Area Homeless Shelter, served on the board of the Samaritan Counseling Center of Northeast Georgia, mentored community youth, taught computer classes, and lobbied for Palestinian rights.  And Jim and Jane helped me on more than one occasion, even allowing me to live upstairs for a few weeks in 2007, when I was between long-term housing arrangements.  Jim recommended good books to me, gave me some, and offered me sage advice.  The last book he gave me—a Lenten guide which N. T. Wright wrote—has become an especially prized possession.

Jim held various jobs over the years, including a position at Jane’s family business, Foster’s Jewelers.  He also operated a business, Vintage Jim’s, and mentored many students at the Presbyterian Student Center near The University of Georgia (UGA).  That was where I met him during an ecumenical excursion.  His kind counsel helped me through some difficult periods in my life, especially UGA-related ones.

Jim, raised a Roman Catholic—once even a member of a religious order—became a Presbyterian.  He, a member of First Presbyterian Church, Athens, served there as an elder.  He also attended General Assemblies of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) as a delegate and mentored Education for Ministry (EFM) groups at St. Gregory the Great Episcopal Church, Athens.  Jim, a warm-hearted man with an inquisitive mind, read scholarly books (especially ones about religious topics) and returned to UGA in his retirement, earning his M.A. in religion.  He died after having attended a lecture on the university campus on March 7, 2013.  It was appropriate that Jim’s final act was an academic one.

Jim was a great man who left the world better than he found it.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 4, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF PAUL CUFFEE, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN MISSIONARY TO THE SHINNECOCK NATION

THE FEAST OF CARL SYLVIUS VOLKNER AND MOKOMOTO, SYMBOLS OF RECONCILATION

THE FEAST OF SAINT CASIMIR OF POLAND, PRINCE

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARINUS OF CAESAREA, ROMAN SOLDIER AND CHRISTIAN MARTYR; AND SAINT ASTERIUS, ROMAN SENATOR AND CHRISTIAN MARTYR

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Holy and righteous God, you created us in your image.

Grant us grace to contend fearlessly against evil

and to make no peace with oppression.

Help us, like your servant Jim McGown,

to work for justice among people and nations,

to the glory of your name, through Jesus Christ,

our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns with you

and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

Feast of Edward Osler (March 7)   1 comment

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Above:  Truro, England, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-08251

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EDWARD OSLER (JANUARY 31, 1798-MARCH 7, 1863)

English Doctor, Editor, and Poet

Edward Osler was the house surgeon at Swansea Infirmary from 1819 to 1836.  That was noble work, to be sure.  But he felt the need for a change.  So our saint went to work in London then in Bath for the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.  Then, in 1841, he transferred to Truro to assume the job he held until his death:  Editor of the Royal Cornwall Gazette.  His literary interests and skills were already established, for he had helped to produce Psalms and Hymns Adopted to the Service of the Church of England (“The Mitre Hymnal”) in 1836.  That volume included fifty of his hymns and fifteen of his psalm settings.

Two of Osler’s hymns which I have added to my GATHERED PRAYERS blog, “Lord of the Church, We Humbly Pray” and “O God Unseen, Yet Ever Near,” come from that hymnal.  Also from “The Mitre Hymnal” is this, the third stanza of “Praise the Lord:  Ye Heavens Adore Him,” as printed in The Hymnal (1933):

Worship, honor, glory, blessing,

Lord, we offer unto Thee;

Young and old, Thy praise expressing,

In glad homage bend the knee.

All the saints in heaven adore Thee;

We would bow before Thy throne:

As Thine angels serve before Thee,

So on earth Thy will be done.

Osler’s literary-spiritual legacy is magnificent.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 19, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ANNE HUTCHINSON, REBELLIOUS PURITAN

THE FEAST OF BLAISE PASCAL, MATHEMATICIAN AND ROMAN CATHOLIC THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN EUDES, FOUNDER OF THE CONGREGATION OF JESUS AND MARY

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Edward Osler and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Revised on December 24, 2016

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Feast of Sts. Drausinus, Ansericus, Vindician, and Leodegarius (March 7)   5 comments

Above:  Gaul in 628 C.E.

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT ANSERICUS (DIED 652)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Soissons

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SAINT DRAUSINUS (DIED CIRCA 674)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Soissons

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SAINT VINDICIAN (632-712)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Cambrai 

His feast transferred from March 9

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SAINT LEODEGARIUS (CIRCA 616-679)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Autun

His feast transferred from October 2

St. Drausinus received his education under St. Ansericus, Bishop of Soissons from 623 to 652.  (I can find no other information about St. Ansericus.)  St. Drausinus became Bishop of Soissons in 657.  He built convents and churches, and was known for his excellent preaching, his wise episcopal leadership, and his simple lifestyle.  St. Drausinus was also able to convince Ebroin, mayor of the Merovingian palace of Theodoric III, King of Neustria from 673 to 678 and King of all Franks from 678 to 691, to found a chapel for sick nuns.  This was quite an accomplishment, given Ebroin’s bad character.

Consider the following story as evidence of Ebroin’s perfidy:

We begin with St. Leodegarius, raised in the court of Cloatire/Lothair II, King of Neustria from 584 to 613 and King of all Franks from 613 to 629, was the nephew of Didon, Bishop of Poitiers, who also raised him and made him archdeacon.  In 651 St. Leodegarius became Abbot of Maxentius Abbey, to which he introduced the Rule of St. Benedict.  He also helped Queen Bathildis govern as regent for her young son, Clotaire/Lothair III, after her husband, Clovis II, died in 656.  St. Leodegarius became Bishop of Autun in 663.  It was a diocese rent asunder by disputes; he restored the see to wholeness.  The bishop also devoted much time to helping the poor.

The Merovingian Dynasty was frequently fractious, with surviving sons of a deceased king dividing the kingdom among themselves and not always exhibiting brotherly love.  Periodically one Merovingian monarch united the realm under his rule, only to have the unification reversed after he died.  This pattern created violent political waters to navigate, and more than one saint lost his life in them.  Clotaire/Lothair III died in 673, survived by two brothers.  Childeric II was King of Austrasia from 662 to 675, and Theodoric III was King of Neustria from 673 to 698.  Childeric II and Theodoric III engaged in a power struggle.  St. Leodegarius supported Childeric II, who reigned as King of all Franks from 673 to 675, until an assassination.  Ebroin, having lost to the forces of Childeric II, found himself exiled for a few years, during which St. Leodegarius functioned as a royal advisor.  Childeric II married a first cousin in 675, at which point St. Leodegarius condemned that union and received exile as a consequence.  Later that year, Theodoric III, the last brother left alive, recalled both St. Leodegarius and Ebroin.  The latter returned after arranging for the murder of his successor as mayor of the palace.

Also in 675, Ebroin convinced the Duke of Champagne and the Bishops of Chalons and Valence to attack Autun.  St. Leodegarius surrendered to spare the city.  Ebroin had the Bishop of Autun blinded, his lips cut off, and his tongue removed.  Three years later, Ebroin convinced Theodoric III that St. Leodegarius was responsible for the murder of Childeric II, with the help of the bishop’s brother, Gerinus.  So Theodoric III had Gerinus stoned to death and St. Leodegarius tortured.  Finally, in 679, St. Leodegarius was deposed formally then executed.

At this point we meet St. Vindician.  Born at Bullecourt, Francia, he was Bishop of Cambrai from 669 to his death, in 712.  As bishop St. Vindician was renowned for making many converts and founding monasteries.  Fellow bishops appointed St. Vindician to confront Theodoric III over the Gerinus-St. Leodegarius matter.  Theodoric III repented after his meeting with St. Vindician, funding St. Vaast Monastery, Arras, near the site of the murder of St. Leodegarius.   Ebroin, who lived by murder, died of an assassination in 680/681.  And St. Vindician died in 712, while visiting Brussels.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

DECEMBER 13, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ELLA J. BAKER, WITNESS FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

THE FEAST OF SAINT LUCY OF SYRACUSE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

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Almighty God,

you raised up faithful bishops of your church,

including your servants

Saint Ansericus,

Saint Drausinus,

Saint Leodegarius,

and Saint Vindician.

May the memory of their lives be a source of joy for us and a bulwark of our faith,

so that we may serve and confess your name before the world,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3:14-21

John 21:15-17 or Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Revised on December 24, 2016

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Saints’ Days and Holy Days for March   Leave a comment

Daffodil

Image Source = Bertil Videt

THIS IS THE RESET VERSION OF THE CALENDAR FOR MARCH, PENDING FURTHER REVISION.

1 (Anna of Oxenhall and Her Faithful Descendants, Wenna the Queen, Non, Samson of Dol, Cybi, and David of Wales)

  • Edwin Hodder, English Biographer, Devotional Writer, and Hymn Writer
  • Roger Lefort, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Bourges

2 (Shabbaz Bhatti and Other Christian Martyrs of the Islamic World)

  • Aidan of Lindisfarne, Celtic Missionary Bishop; Caelin, Celtic Priest; St. Cedd of Lastingham, Celtic and Roman Catholic Priest, Bishop of Essex, and Abbot of Lastingham; Cynibil of Lastingham, Celtic and Roman Catholic Priest and Monk; Chad of Mercia, Celtic and Roman Catholic Priest, Abbot of Lastingham, Bishop of York/the Northumbrians and of Lichfield/the Mercians and the Lindsey People; Vitalian, Bishop of Rome; Adrian of Canterbury, Roman Catholic Abbot of Ss. Peter and Paul, Canterbury; Theodore of Tarsus, Roman Catholic Monk and Archbishop of Canterbury; and Cuthbert of Lindisfarne, Celtic and Roman Catholic Monk, Hermit, Priest, and Bishop of Lindisfarne
  • Daniel March, Sr., U.S. Congregationalist and Presbyterian Minister, Poet, Hymn Writer, and Liturgist
  • John Stuart Blackie, Scottish Presbyterian Scholar, Linguist, Poet, Theologian, and Hymn Writer
  • Ludmilla of Bohemia, Duchess of Bohemia and Martyr, 921; her grandson, Wenceslaus I, Duke of Bohemia and Martyr, 929; Agnes of Prague, Bohemian Princess and Nun; Pen Pal of Clare of Assisi, Foundress of the Poor Clares; Sister of Agnes of Assisi, Abbot at Monticelli; Daughter of Hortulana of Assisi, Poor Clare Nun

3 (Katharine Drexel, Founder of the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament)

  • Antonio Francesco Marzorati, Johannes Laurentius Weiss, and Michele Pro Fasoli, Franscican Missionary Priests and Martyrs in Ethiopia, 1716
  • Gervinus, Roman Catholic Abbot and Scholar
  • Henry Elias Fries, U.S. Moravian Industrialist; and his wife, Rosa Elvira Fries, U.S. Moravian Musician

4 (Charles Simeon, Anglican Priest and Promoter of Missions; Henry Martyn, Anglican Priest, Linguist, Translator, and Missionary; and Abdul Masih, Indian Convert and Missionary)

  • John Edgar Park, U.S. Presbyterian then Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Paul Cuffee, U.S. Presbyterian Missionary to the Shinnecock Nation
  • Thomas Hornblower Gill, English Unitarian then Anglican Hymn Writer

5 (Karl Rahner, Jesuit Priest and Theologian)

  • Christopher Macassoli of Vigevano, Franciscan Priest
  • Eusebius of Cremona, Roman Catholic Abbot and Humanitarian
  • Ion Costist, Franciscan Lay Brother

6 (Martin Niemoller, German Lutheran Minister and Peace Activist)

  • Chrodegang of Metz, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • Jordan of Pisa, Dominican Evangelist
  • William Bright, Anglican Canon, Scholar, and Hymn Writer

7 (James Hewitt McGown, Humanitarian)

  • Drausinus and Ansericus, Roman Catholic Bishops of Soissons; Vindician, Roman Catholic Bishop of Cambrai; and Leodegarius, Roman Catholic Bishop of Autun
  • Edward Osler, English Doctor, Editor, and Poet
  • Perpetua, Felicity, and Their Companions, Martyrs at Carthage, 203

8 (Edward King, Bishop of Lincoln)

  • Geoffrey Studdert Kennedy, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • John Hampden Gurney, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • John of God, Founder of the Brothers Hospitallers of Saint John of God

9 (Harriet Tubman, U.S. Abolitionist)

  • Emanuel Cronenwett, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator
  • Frances of Rome, Foundress of the Collatines
  • Sophronius of Jerusalem, Roman Catholic Patriarch

10 (Marie-Joseph Lagrange, Roman Catholic Priest and Biblical Scholar)

  • Agripinnus of Autun, Roman Catholic Bishop; Germanus of Paris, Roman Catholic Bishop; and Droctoveus of Autun, Roman Catholic Abbot
  • Folliot Sandford Pierpoint, Anglican Educator, Poet, and Hymn Writer
  • John Oglivie, Scottish Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1615
  • Macarius of Jerusalem, Roman Catholic Bishop

11 (John Swertner, Dutch-German Moravian Minister, Hymn Writer, Hymn Translator, and Hymnal Editor; and his collaborator, John Mueller, German-English Moravian Minister, Hymn Writer, and Hymnal Editor)

  • Aengus the Culdee, Hermit and Monk; and Maelruan, Abbot
  • Eulogius of Spain, Roman Catholic Bishop of Toledo, Cordoba; and Leocrita; Roman Catholic Martyrs, 859

12 (Trasilla and Emiliana; their sister-in-law, Sylvia of Rome; and her son, Gregory I “the Great,” Bishop of Rome)

  • Maximillian of Treveste, Roman Conscientious Objector
  • Rutilio Grande, Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr
  • Theophanes the Chroncler, Defender of Icons

13 (Yves Congar, Roman Catholic Priest and Theologian)

  • Heldrad, Roman Catholic Abbot
  • Plato of Symboleon and Theodore Studites, Eastern Orthodox Abbots, and Nicephorus of Constantinople, Patriarch
  • Roderic of Cabra and Solomon of Cordoba, Roman Catholic Martyrs, 857

14 (Fannie Lou Hamer, Prophet of Freedom)

  • Albert Lister Peace, Organist in England and Scotland
  • Harriet King Osgood Munger, U.S. Congregationalist Hymn Writer
  • Nehemiah Goreh, Indian Anglican Priest and Theologian

15 (Zachary of Rome, Pope)

  • Jan Adalbert Balicki and Ladislaus Findysz, Roman Catholic Priests in Poland
  • Ozora Stearns Davis, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Theologian, and Hymn Writer
  • Vethappan Solomon, Apostle to the Nicobar Islands

16 (Adalbald of Ostevant, Rictrudis of Marchiennes, and Their Relations)

  • Abraham Kidunaia, Roman Catholic Hermit, and Mary of Edessa, Roman Catholic Anchoress
  • John Cacciafronte, Roman Catholic Monk, Abbot, Bishop, and Martyr, 1183
  • Megingaud of Wurzburg, Roman Catholic Monk and Bishop

17 (Patrick, Apostle of Ireland)

  • Ebenezer Elliott, “The Corn Law Rhymer”
  • Henry Scott Holland, Anglican Hymn Writer and Priest

18 (Leonides of Alexandria, Roman Catholic Martyr, 202; Origen, Roman Catholic Theologian; Demetrius of Alexandria, Roman Catholic Bishop; and Alexander of Jerusalem, Roman Catholic Bishop)

  • Cyril of Jerusalem, Bishop, Theologian, and Liturgist
  • Eliza Sibbald Alderson, Poet and Hymn Writer; and John Bacchus Dykes, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Paul of Cyprus, Eastern Orthodox Martyr, 760
  • Robert Walmsley, English Congregationalist Hymn Writer

19 (JOSEPH OF NAZARETH, HUSBAND OF MARY, MOTHER OF GOD)

20 (Sebastian Castellio, Prophet of Religious Liberty)

  • Christopher Wordsworth, Hymn Writer and Anglican Bishop of Lincoln
  • Maria Josefa Sancho de Guerra, Foundress of the Congregation of the Servants of Jesus
  • Samuel Rodigast, German Lutheran Academic and Hymn Writer

21 (Johann Sebastian Bach, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, and Johann Christian Bach, Composers)

  • Nicholas of Flüe and His Grandson, Conrad Scheuber, Swiss Hermits
  • Serapion of Thmuis, Roman Catholic Bishop

22 (Deogratias, Roman Catholic Bishop of Carthage)

  • Emmanuel Mournier, Personalist Philosopher
  • James De Koven, Episcopal Priest
  • Thomas Hughes, British Social Reformer and Member of Parliament
  • William Edward Hickson, English Music Educator and Social Reformer

23 (Gregory the Illuminator and Isaac the Great, Patriarchs of Armenia)

  • Meister Eckhart, Roman Catholic Theologian and Mystic
  • Metodej Dominik Trčka, Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1959
  • Victorian of Hadrumetum, Martyr at Carthage, 484

24 (Oscar Romero, Roman Catholic Archbishop of San Salvador; and the Martyrs of El Salvador, 1980-1992)

  • Didacus Joseph of Cadiz, Capuchin Friar
  • Paul Couturier, Apostle of Christian Unity
  • Thomas Attwood, “Father of Modern Church Music”

25 (ANNUNCIATION OF OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST)

  • Dismas, Penitent Bandit

26 (Margaret Clitherow, English Roman Catholic Martyr, 1586)

  • George Rundle Prynne, Anglican Priest, Poet, and Hymn Writer
  • Ludger, Roman Catholic Bishop of Munster

27 (Charles Henry Brent, Episcopal Missionary Bishop of the Philippines, Bishop of Western New York, and Ecumenist)

  • Nicholas Owen, Thomas Garnet, Mark Barkworth, Edward Oldcorne, and Ralph Ashley, Roman Catholic Martyrs, 1601-1608
  • Robert Hall Baynes, Anglican Bishop of Madagascar
  • Rupert of Salzburg, Apostle of Bavaria and Austria

28 (James Solomon Russell, Episcopal Priest, Educator, and Advocate for Racial Equality)

  • Guntram of Burgundy, King
  • Katharine Lee Bates, U.S. Educator, Poet, and Hymn Writer
  • Richard Chevenix Trench, Anglican Archbishop of Dublin
  • Tutilo, Roman Catholic Monk and Composer

29 (Charles Villiers Stanford, Composer, Organist, and Conductor)

  • Dora Greenwell, Poet and Devotional Writer
  • John Keble, Anglican Priest and Poet
  • Jonas and Barachisius, Roman Catholic Martyrs, 327

30 (Innocent of Alaska, Equal to the Apostles and Enlightener of North America)

  • John Marriott, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • John Wright Buckham, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Theologian, and Hymn Writer

31 (Maria Skobtsova, Russian Orthodox Martyr, 1945)

  • Ernest Trice Thompson, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Renewer of the Church
  • Franz Joseph Haydn and his brother, Michael Haydn, Composers
  • Joan of Toulouse, Carmelite Nun; and Simon Stock, Carmelite Friar
  • John Donne, Anglican Priest and Poet

Floating

  • The Confession of Saint Martha of Bethany (the Sunday immediately prior to Palm Sunday; March 8-April 11)

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.