Archive for the ‘May 23’ Category

Feast of Benjamin Carr (May 23)   Leave a comment

Above:  Benjamin Carr 

Image in the Public Domain

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BENJAMIN CARR (SEPTEMBER 12, 1768-MAY 24, 1831)

Anglo-American Composer and Organist

Benjamin Carr comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).

Music was the family business.  Our saint, born in London, England, on September 12, 1768, was a son of Joseph Carr, a music publisher.  Benjamin studied music in London.  He also performed as a soloist in Ancient Concerts in that city.  The family immigrated to the United States and settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1793.  Our saint joined the family business, Carr’s Musical Repository, the first music store in the United States.  The original and main location was Philadelphia.  Benjamin opened the satellite store in New York City.  Brother Thomas opened the satellite store in Baltimore, Maryland.  Carr’s Musical Repository published patriotic music, including the Federal Overture, one of our saint’s compositions.

Carr was an organist, a pianist, a conductor, and a composer.  In 1800, he founded the Musical Journal to bring European music to the United States.  After 1800, he focused mainly on teaching and church music.  He, he briefly the organist at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Philadelphia, spent three decades as the organist and the director of music at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Philadelphia.  Carr also arranged the hymn tune SPANISH HYMN/MADRID/SPANISH CHANT (“Come, Christians, Join to Sing“) in 1825.  His arrangement was for solo, quartet, and a full choir.

Carr, aged 62 years, died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 24, 1831.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 23, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT IVO OF CHARTRES, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF BENJAMIN CARR, ANGLO-AMERICAN COMPOSER AND ORGANIST

THE FEAST OF FREDERICK AUGUSTUS BENNETT, FIRST MAORI BISHOP IN AOTEAROA/NEW ZEALAND

THE FEAST OF SAINTS JÓZEF KURGAWA AND WINCENTY MATSUZEWSKI, POLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS AND MARTYRS, 1940

THE FEAST OF SAINT WILLIAM OF PERTH, ENGLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC BAKER AND MARTYR, 1201

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

we bless your name for inspiring [Benjamin Carr]

and all those who with music have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior, who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 728

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Feast of St. William of Perth (May 23)   2 comments

Above:  St. William of Perth

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT WILLIAM OF PERTH (DIED IN 1201)

Scottish Roman Catholic Baker and Martyr, 1201

Also known as Saint William of Rochester

Alternative feast day = April 22

St. William of Perth/Rochester comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Roman Catholic Church and the Scottish Episcopal Church.

St. William, a native of Perth, Scotland, led a reckless youth yet came to faith as an adult.  He, a baker, gave every tenth loaf or so of bread to the poor.  Our saint also attended Mass daily.  St. William rescued and adopted an abandoned infant, whom he named David.  Unfortunately, David was a bad seed.  In 1201, when David and St. William were on pilgrimage, in Rochester, England, en route to the Holy Land, David murdered his adoptive father then fled.  The Church declared St. William a martyr because he died on pilgrimage.

The place where David murdered St. William became the site of a tomb, a chapel, and a shrine.  One reason for this was that, on the day of the murder, a woman reported her miraculous healing at our saint’s corpse.  Rochester was the destination for many pilgrims for centuries.

Pope Innocent IV canonized St. William in 1256.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 10, 2020 COMMON ERA

GOOD FRIDAY

THE FEAST OF PIERRE TEILHARD DE CHARDIN, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST, SCIENTIST, AND THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF SAINT FULBERT OF CHARTRES, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF HENRY VAN DYKE, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER AND THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF HOWARD THURMAN, U.S. PROTESTANT THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM LAW, ANGLICAN PRIEST, MYSTIC, AND SPIRITUAL WRITER

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Almighty and everlasting God, who kindled the flame of your love

in the heart of your holy martyr Saint William of Perth/Rochester:

Grant to us, your humble servants, a like faith and power of love,

that we who rejoice in his triumph may profit by his example;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 15:15-21

Psalm 124 or 31:1-5

1 Peter 4:12-19

Mark 8:34-38

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 715

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Feast of Frederick Augustus Bennett (May 23)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Flag of New Zealand

Image in the Public Domain

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FREDERICK AUGUSTUS BENNETT (NOVEMBER 15, 1871-SEPTEMBER 16, 1950)

First Maori Anglican Bishop in Aotearoa/New Zealand

Also known as Ngati Whakaue

Bishop Frederick Augustus Bennett/Ngati Whakaue comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand, and Polynesia.

Bennett, born in Ohinemutu, Lake Rotorua, on November 15, 1871, had a dual heritage.  His father was Thomas Jackson Bennett, an Irish immigrant and a storekeeper.  Our saint’s mother was Raiha Ratete (also known as Eliza Rogers), a Maori.

Bennett grew up in the Anglican Church.  He, a pupil at Native Schools, became the secretary of the temperance society at Lake Tarawera when he was 14 years old.  Our saint, further educated at the cathedral school in Nelson then at Nelson College, sang in the choir at the cathedral and taught Sunday School.

Bennett became a clergyman.  He, a lay reader at Putiki, Wanganui, starting in 1893, raised funds for a school at that place.  In late 1895 he returned to Nelson to continue his studies.  Our saint became a deacon in 1896 then a priest the following year.  His first assignment was an assistant at All Saints’ Church, Nelson.  He organized the choral singing there.  Our saint also built a church in Motueka and a school at Whangarae Bay, Croisilles Harbour.  He also became active in the Te Aute College Students’ Association (forerunner of the Young Maori Party) in the 1890s, for the spiritual, physical, social, and intellectual condition of his people concerned him.

Bennett married twice and had nineteen children.  His first wife, from May 11, 1899, to August 1909, was Hana Te Unuhi Mere Paaka, also known as Hannah Mary Park.  The couple had three sons and two daughters.  Hana died in August 1909.  Our saint married Arihia Rangioue Pakiha on December 14, 1911.  They had fourteen children lived to adulthood.

Bennett and Hana served in Bell Block, Taranaki, until 1905.  Our saint raised funds for a mission center and opened the first native school in the area.  He also cooperated with Minister of Native Affairs James Carroll to pass the Licensing Acts Amendment Act (1904), to ban the sale of alcohol to Maori for consumption away from licensed areas.  The time Bennett devoted to this effort displeased his superiors in the diocese.  He resigned.

Bennett served as the superintendent of the Maori mission, Roturua, from 1905 to 1917.  His territory extended from Roturua to Taupo to Tokaanu, all on the North Island.  Our saint raised funds for the construction of church buildings and recruited ministerial students.  Bennett also resisted official violations of indigenous rights.  He defended the right of student Manihera Tumatahi to fish (without getting fined) on Manihera Tumatahi’s parents’ property in 1907.  Who owned the lake bed?  Eventually, in 1922, the government of New Zealand agreed to pay Maori owners an annuity, and placed the Arawa District Trust Board in charge of the funds.  Bennett served in Hawke’s Bay from 1917 to 1928.  His mission area extended from Waipatu to Nuhaka, also on the North Island.  Our saint, a member of the Standing Committee of the Diocese of Waiapu, published many Maori-language periodicals and pamphlets.

T. W. Ratana (1873-1939) posed a challenge to Anglican missionary work among the Maori.  In 1918, during the global Spanish Influenza pandemic, Ratana, a faith healer and political activist, confronted Western imperialist arrogance.  The Anglican Church supported Ratana until 1925, when he founded the Ratana Established Church of New Zealand (Te Haahi Ratana).  The Anglican Church responded to Ratana by installiing Bennett as the first Maori bishop, in 1928.

Bennett was the First Bishop of Aotearoa, an assistant to the Bishop of Waiapu. On December 2, 1928, our saint assumed his new duties.  He, unlike other bishops, had no territorial jurisdiction.  He did not even have the right to minister in all dioceses in New Zealand, for some bishops preferred to keep their Maori missions in-house.

Bishop Bennett remained faithful and busy.  He continued to combat alcoholism in the Maori population.  Our saint also participated in the translation of the Bible into Maori, preached at Westminster Abbey during the Lambeth Conference of 1948, and attended the First Assembly of the World Council of Churches (1948).

Our saint died at home, in Kohupatiki, Hawke’s Bay, on September 16, 1950.  He was 80 years old.

A son, Manuhuia Augustus Bennett (1916-2001), served as the Third Bishop of Aotearoa from 1968 to 1981.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 9, 2020 COMMON ERA

MAUNDY THURSDAY

THE FEAST OF DIETRICH BONHOEFFER, GERMAN LUTHERAN MARTYR, 1945

THE FEAST OF JOHANN CRUGER, GERMAN LUTHERAN ORGANIST, COMPOSER, AND HYMNAL EDITOR

THE FEAST OF JOHN SAMUEL BEWLEY MONSELL, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND POET; AND RICHARD MANT, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF DOWN, CONNOR, AND DROMORE

THE FEAST OF LYDIA EMILIE GRUCHY, FIRST FEMALE MINISTER IN THE UNITED CHURCH OF CANADA

THE FEAST OF MIKAEL AGRICOLA, FINNISH LUTHERAN LITURGIST, BISHOP OF TURKU, AND “FATHER OF FINNISH LITERARY LANGUAGE”

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Living God, in the fullness of time, the mantle of your Holy Spirit

clothed Frederick Augustus Bennett as a father in your whanau,

to lead the Maori people by preaching your word, rebuking error, and teaching with unfailing patience;

grant us the same spirit of power, love, and self-control,

that we may do what pleases you;

through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

or

Blessed are you, God of all mana and authority, in Frederick, the first Maori bishop;

for it is your will that every race will have its part to direct the church.  Amen.

1 Samuel 3:1-10

Psalm 101 or 122

2 Corinthians 3:1-6

Matthew 9:35-38

–The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand, and Polynesia

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Feast of Blesseds Jozef Kurgawa and Wincenty Matuszewski (May 23)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Flag of Poland, 1927-1980

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED WINCENTY MATUSZEWSKI (MARCH 3, 1869-MAY 23, 1940)

and 

BLESSED JÓZEF KURGAWA (JANUARY 6, 1910-MAY 23, 1940)

Polish Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs, 1940

Alternative feast days (as two of the 108 (Polish) Martyrs of World War II) = June 12

These two saints died because they were Roman Catholic priests.

Blessed Wincenty Matuszewski was a son of Józef and Józefa Matuszewski.  The native of Chruscienska, Wola, Lódzkie (now in Poland), debuted on March 3, 1869.  Our saint, a graduate of the major seminary in Wloclawek, became a priest on February 17, 1895.  He served in various parishes before he arrived in Osieciny in 1918.  Matuszewski was active in the life of the community.  He, the honorary president of the local fire brigade in town, helped poor people, won the respect of Germanic residents, and was on good terms with Jews.

Blessed Józef Kurgawa was a son of Jan and Józefa Kurgawa.  The native of Swierczyn, Wielkopolskie (now in Poland), debuted on January 6, 1910.  Our saint matriculated at the major seminary in Wloclawek in 1931.  He, ordained to the priesthood on June 14, 1936, served in Osieciny with Matuszewski.

Shortly after the German-Soviet partition and invasion of Poland, agents of the Gestapo arrested Matuszewski and Kurgawa.  Both priests became martyrs at Witowo, Kujawsko-Pomorskie, Poland, on May 23, 1940.  Matuszewski was 71 years old.  Kurgawa was 30 years old.

Pope John Paul II declared both men Venerables and beatified them in 1999.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 8, 2020 COMMON ERA

WEDNESDAY IN HOLY WEEK

THE FEAST OF HENRY MELCHIOR MUHLENBERG, PATRIARCH OF AMERICAN LUTHERANISM; HIS GREAT-GRANDSON, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS MUHLENBERG, EPISCOPAL PRIEST, HYMN WRITER, AND LITURGICAL PIONEER; AND HIS COLLEAGUE, ANNE AYRES, FOUNDRESS OF THE SISTERHOOD OF THE HOLY COMMUNION

THE FEAST OF SAINT DIONYSIUS OF CORINTH, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF SAINT HUGH OF ROUEN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP, ABBOT, AND MONK

THE FEAST OF SAINT JULIE BILLIART, FOUNDRESS OF THE CONGREGATION OF THE SISTERS OF NOTRE DAME

THE FEAST OF TIMOTHY LULL, U.S. LUTHERAN MINISTER, SCHOLAR, THEOLOGIAN, AND ECUMENIST

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Almighty God, who gave to your servants Blesseds Wincenty Matuszewski and Józef Kurgawa

boldness to confess the Name of our Savior Jesus Christ before the rulers of this world,

and courage to die for this faith:

Grant that we may always be ready to give a reason for the hope that is in us,

and to suffer gladly for the sake of our Lord Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

2 Esdras 2:42-48

Psalm 126 or 121

1 Peter 3:14-18, 22

Matthew 10:16-22

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 713

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Feast of St. Ivo of Chartres (May 23)   Leave a comment

Above:  St. Ivo of Chartres

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT IVO OF CHARTRES (CIRCA 1040-DECEMBER 23, 1115/1116)

Bishop of Chartres

Alternative feast day = December 23

St. Ivo, Bishop of Chartres, lived his faith during treacherous political times.  Our saint, born into French nobility in Beauvais circa 1040, studied in Paris then at the Abbey of Bec, Normandy.  In 1080 his Bishop appointed him to be the Prior of St. Quentin, Beauvais.  In that capacity St. Ivo became one of the best teachers in France.  He transferred to Chartres in 1090.  There our saint succeeded one Geoffrey, the previous Bishop of Chartres, deposed for committing simony.  St. Ivo, an opponent of simony, was also a consultant in the fields of theology and canon law.

Two great controversies confronted St. Ivo.  King Philip I (reigned 1059-1108) created one of these in 1092, when he married Bertrada de Montfort, wife of Fulk, the Count of Anjou.  Not only was Bertrada married, so so was Philip I.  His wife (until her death in 1094) was Queen Bertha.  Pope Urban II (in office 1088-1099) excommunicated the French monarch, lifted the order Bertha died, then reimposed it several times.  Pope Paschal II (in office 1099-1118) lifted the excommunication on the condition that Philip I have no more relations with Bertrada.  St. Ivo, like the Popes, opposed Philip I.  Our saint, unlike the Supreme Pontiffs, went to prison.

The other great controversy related to the lay investiture of bishops and abbots.  Popes and monarchs argued about this matter for a long time.  St. Ivo proposed a moderate position that presaged the Concordat of Worms (1122), concluded after his death.  In that agreement monarchs retained the right to attend consecrations and to invest bishops and abbots with symbols of temporal authority, but relinquished the right to invest bishops and abbots with symbols of spiritual authority.  Monarchs also agreed to guarantee free and canonical elections.

Pope Pius V beatified St. Ivo in 1570.

The status of St. Ivo’s canonization seems to be in doubt.  CatholicSaints.Info lists our saint as “Blessed Ivo of Chartres” and lists Pope Benedict XIV (in office 1740-1758) as having added him to the martyrology.  Omer Englebert, in The Lives of the Saints (1951), lists our saint as “St. Ivo of Chartres.”

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 22, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ROBERT SEAGRAVE, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

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O God, our heavenly Father, who raised up your servant Saint Ivo of Chartres,

to be a bishop and pastor in your Church and to feed your flock:

Give abundantly to all pastors the gifts of your Holy Spirit,

that they may minister in your household as true servants of your divine mysteries;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with

you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84 or 84:7-11

Ephesians 3:14-21

Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 719

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Feast of the First Book of Common Prayer, 1549 (May-June)   Leave a comment

Above:  Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury

THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER (1549)

Effective on the Day of Pentecost, June 9, 1549, During the Reign of King Edward VI

The Episcopal Church specifies that one observes this feast properly on a weekday after the Day of Pentecost.

The 1549 Book of Common Prayer, which, along with many of its successors, is available at http://justus.anglican.org/resources/bcp/, was mainly the product of Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury and poet extraordinaire.  He translated texts from various sources, ranging from Greek liturgies to German Lutheran rites to the Roman Catholic missal and the Liturgy of the Hours.  Along the way Cranmer quoted the Bible extensively.  Thus it is a common Anglican and Episcopal joke to say that the Bible quotes the Prayer Book.

My first encounter with the Book of Common Prayer was indirect, so indirect in fact that I was not aware of it.  I grew up United Methodist in the era of the 1966 Methodist Hymnal, which is far superior to the 1989 United Methodist Hymnal.  The ritual in the 1966 Hymnal was that of its 1935 and 1905 predecessors, that is, based on the 1662 Book of Common Prayer.   So, when I saw the 1979 Prayer Book and read Holy Eucharist Rite I, I recognized it immediately, down to the Prayer of Humble Access.

Now I an Episcopalian.  As someone told me early this year, I left the church that John Wesley made and joined the church that made John Wesley.  The rhythms of the 1979 Prayer Book have sunk into my synapses and my soul.  I also use A New Zealand Prayer Book (1989), of  The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, which breaks out from parts of tradition creatively and beautifully while standing within the Prayer Book tradition.

I have become a person of the Prayer Book, thankfully.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 24, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT BARTHOLOMEW, APOSTLE AND MARTYR

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Almighty and everliving God, whose servant Thomas Cranmer, with others, restored the language of the people in the prayers of your Church:  Make us always thankful for this heritage; and help us to pray in the Spirit and with the understanding, that we may worthily magnify your holy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Kings 8:54-61

Psalm 33:1-5, 20-21

Acts 2:38-42

John 4:21-24

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010)

Fiftieth Day of Easter: Day of Pentecost, Year B   Leave a comment

Above:  Descent of the Holy Spirit

Our Advocate

MAY 23, 2021

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The Assigned Readings for This Sunday:

Acts 2:1-21 or Ezekiel 37:1-14

Psalm 104:25-35, 37

Romans 8:22-27 or Acts 2:1-21

John 15:26-27; 16:4b-15

The Collect:

Almighty God, on this day you opened the way of eternal life to every race and nation by the promised gift of your Holy Spirit: Shed abroad this gift throughout the world by the preaching of the Gospel, that it may reach to the ends of the earth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

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Some Related Posts:

Fiftieth Day of Easter:  Day of Pentecost, Year A:

http://lenteaster.wordpress.com/2010/10/29/fiftieth-day-of-easter-day-of-pentecost-year-a/

Fiftieth Day of Easter:   Day of Pentecost, Year B:

http://lenteaster.wordpress.com/2011/08/02/fiftieth-day-of-easter-day-of-pentecost-year-b/

A Prayer for Those With Only the Holy Spirit to Intercede for Them:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2010/07/17/a-prayer-for-those-with-only-the-holy-spirit-to-intercede-for-them/

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I have written more than once that judgment and mercy coexist in the Bible.  This assertion is obvious from a close reading of the sacred anthology.  This day the emphasis belongs on mercy.

We read in John 16 that the Holy Spirit, the Third Person of the Trinity, is the Advocate.  This is a legal term; our Advocate is our defense attorney.  In other words, God stands with us, so why should we fear?

Nevertheless, many Christians have suffered persecution and martyrdom for twenty centuries.  Many still do.  And Jesus, from whose Greek title, Christ, we derive the label “Christian,” died on a cross.  So this divine companionship and defense does not guard every follower of God from physical or legal harm.  Yet the message of Christ has continued to spread, the blood of the martyrs continues to water the Church, and killing people cannot end the spread of Christianity.

Beyond all that, those who die faithful to God go to God in the afterlife.  No harm can touch them there.  This might seem like cold comfort or no comfort in this life, but it is something.  The world is imperfect, and only God can repair it.

Yet may we rejoice that we have an Advocate.  May the quality of our lives reflect this gratitude.

KRT

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Published in a nearly identical form at LENTEN AND EASTER DEVOTIONS BY KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR on August 2, 2011

Posted August 2, 2011 by neatnik2009 in May 23, Revised Common Lectionary Year B

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