Archive for the ‘May 29’ Category

Feast of Ruby Middleton Forsythe (May 29)   Leave a comment

Above:  Chapel/Old Church, Holy Cross Faith Memorial Episcopal Church, Pawleys Island, South Carolina

Image Source = Google Earth

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RUBY MIDDLETON FORSYTHE (JUNE 27, 1905-MAY 29, 1992)

African-American Episcopal Educator

Ruby Middleton Forsythe comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Episcopal Church.  A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  A Calendar of Commemorations (2016), an official resource and the volume containing the denomination’s side calendar of saints, has an appendix.  Two pages in this appendix list people officially “worthy of commemoration” whom The Episcopal Church has yet to recognize formally because four decades (give or take a year or so) have not passed since their decease.  Forsythe’s name is on this list.  I have no forty-year rule, although I understand why the denomination has one.

(Aside:  The Episcopal Church has made a few–at least two, to my knowledge–to this rule.  It added Martin Luther King, Jr. (1939-1968); and Jonathan Myrick Daniels (1939-1965).  Both were martyrs for the Gospel and for civil rights.)

Our saint, born Ruby Middleton, spent sixty of her nearly eighty-seven years as a teacher.  Middleton, born in Charleston, South Carolina, on June 27, 1905, graduated from Avery Normal Institute, Charleston, in 1921.  “Miss Ruby,” as many people called her, went on to earn her Bachelor of Science degree from South Carolina State College, Orangeburg.  Our saint lived in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina, where she took care of her parents and taught until 1937.  Toward the end of that time she married Father William Essex Forsythe (1889-1974), the Vicar of Holy Cross Faith Memorial Episcopal Church, Pawleys Island, South Carolina.  The congregation operated a one-room school, the only local school for African-American youth.  Our saint did not move to Pawleys Island immediately, for she took care of her parents.  She did, however, visit Pawleys Island during summers through 1937.

Holy Cross Faith Memorial Episcopal Church had originally been two missions, each with its own school.  Holy Cross-Brookgreen Mission dated to 1896.  Faith Memorial Mission dated to 1903.  Father Forsythe served as the vicar of both missions from 1926 to 1930, then as the vicar of the merged mission, starting in 1930.

Our saint taught in the school on Pawleys Island from 1938 to 1981, when she retired.  She outlived her husband, who taught in the school until he died in 1974.  Holy Cross Faith Memorial Church became a center of African-American life in the Diocese of South Carolina.  Camp Baskervill, a summer camp for African Americans, occurred on the grounds from 1939 to the 1990s, for example.

Our saint, who retired in 1981, received much recognition.  She received four honorary doctorates.  She was the subject of a segment of 60 MinutesNewsweek magazine declared her one of “America’s Unsung Heroes.”  President George H. W. Bush labeled her one of the Thousand Points of Light.

“Miss Ruby” died in Mount Pleasant on May 29, 1992.

The school closed in 2000.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 17, 2020 COMMON ERA

FRIDAY IN EASTER WEEK

THE FEAST OF DANIEL SYLVESTER TUTTLE, PRESIDING BISHOP OF THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH

THE FEAST OF EMILY COOPER, EPISCOPAL DEACONESS

THE FEAST OF LUCY LARCOM, U.S. ACADEMIC, JOURNALIST, POET, EDITOR, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT MAX JOSEF METZGER, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR, 1944

THE FEAST OF WILBUR KENNETH HOWARD, MODERATOR OF THE UNITED CHURCH OF CANADA

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Almighty God, the fountain of all wisdom:

Enlighten by your Holy Spirit those who teach and those who learn,

that, rejoicing in the knowledge of your truth,

they may worship you and serve you from generation to generation;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with

you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9, 20-25

Psalm 78:1-7

2 Timothy 3:4-4:5

Matthew 11:25-30

A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  A Calendar of Commemorations (2016), A60

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Feast of Blessed Mary Theresa Ledochowska and St. Ursula Ledochowska (May 29)   Leave a comment

Above:  A Partial Family Tree

Scan by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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BLESSED MARY THERESA LEDÓCHOWSKA (APRIL 29, 1863-JUNE 6, 1922)

Foundress of the Missionary Sisters of Saint Peter Claver

“Mother of the African Missions”

Her feast transferred from July 6

sister of

SAINT URSULA LEDÓCHOWSKA (APRIL 17, 1865-MAY 29, 1939)

Foundress of the Congregation of the Ursulines of the Agonizing Heart of Jesus (the Gray Ursulines)

Born Julia Ledóchowska

Celebrating saints related to each other and writing about them in one post is positive.  Doing so is consistent with emphasizing relationships, one of my goals for this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.

The Ledóchowska sisters, from a pious family, devoted their lives to God.  Count Antoni Halka-Ledóchowski (Polish) and Countess Josephine Salis-Zizers (Austrian) had titles yet not wealth.  They also had faith, which they inculcated in their children.  Aside from the featured sisters, another notable offspring was Wlodomir Ledóchowski (1866-1942), the Superior-General of the Society of Jesus from 1914 to 1942.  The featured sisters, born in Loosdoor, Austria, moved with their family to Saint Poelten, Austria, in 1873, because of financial difficulty.  Count Antoni died of small pox in 1885.  That year, Blessed Mary Theresa recovered from the disease.  In Count Antoni’s absence, an uncle, a cardinal, became more involved in the lives of the children.  Through his intervention, Blessed Mary Theresa became a lady-in-waiting to Princess Alice of Parma, the Grand Duchess of Tuscany, at her palace in Salzburg.

Blessed Mary Theresa continued her faith journey at Salzburg.  She joined the Third Order of Saint Francis.  Members of the Franciscan Missionaries of Mary visited the court to raise funds for their African missions (especially in Madagascar) and anti-slavery activity two consecutive years in the late 1880s.  The second year, Blessed Mary Theresa concluded that she had found her calling.  She left the court and moved in with a community of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul at Salzburg in 1889.  Blessed Mary Theresa organized the Solidality of Saint Peter Claver for the African Missions and the Liberation of Slaves in 1894.  Members were lay women.  St. Peter Claver (1580/1581-1654) had been the “Apostle to the Slaves” or the “Apostle of the Negroes” (depending on which source one quotes).  The Solidality became the Missionary Sisters of Saint Peter Claver on September 8, 1897.  Blessed Mary Theresa, as head of the order, traveled in Europe to raise funds.  She became the “Mother of the African Missions.”

Julia became an Ursuline nun as Ursula.  She founded the Ursulines of the Agonizing Heart of Jesus (the Gray Ursulines) in 1906.  At the request of Pope Pius X, she worked as a missionary in Russia from 1907 until the Bolsheviks, having come to power, expelled her.  Then St. Ursula served as a missionary in Finland for a few years.  She translated and published a Finnish catechism.  Then St. Ursula returned to Rome at the request of Pope Benedict XV (reigned 1914-1922).  She administered the order from Rome for the rest of her life.

Blessed Maria Theresa, 59 years old, died of tuberculosis in Rome on June 6, 1922.  Pope Paul VI beatified her in 1975.

St. Ursula, 74 years old, died in Rome on May 29, 1939.  Pope John Paul II declared her a Venerable then beatified her in 1983.  He canonized her in 2003.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 16, 2020 COMMON ERA

THURSDAY IN HOLY WEEK

THE FEAST OF SAINT BERNADETTE OF LOURDES, VISIONARY

THE FEAST OF CALVIN WEISS LAUFER, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER AND HYMNODIST

THE FEAST OF ISABELLA GILMORE, ANGLICAN DEACONESS

THE FEAST OF SAINT MIKEL SUMA, ALBANIAN ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST, FRIAR, AND MARTYR, 1950

THE FEAST OF PETER WILLIAMS CASSEY, AFRICAN-AMERICAN EPISCOPAL DEACON; AND HIS WIFE, ANNIE BESANT CASSEY, AFRICAN-AMERICAN EPISCOPAL EDUCATOR 

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God of grace and glory, we praise you for your servants

Blessed Mary Theresa Ledóchowska and Saint Ursula Ledóchowska.

who made the good news known in Africa, Russia, and Finland.

Raise up, we pray, in every country, heralds of the Gospel,

so that the world may know the immeasurable riches of your love,

and be drawn to worship you, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, now and forever.  Amen.

Isaiah 63:1-7

Psalm 48

Romans 10:11-17

Luke 24:44-53

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 59

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Feast of Percy Dearmer (May 29)   1 comment

Above:  Westminster, Evening (1909), by Joseph Pennell (1857-1926)

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsca-06832

 

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PERCIVAL DEARMER (FEBRUARY 27, 1867-MAY 29, 1936)

Anglican Priest, Liturgist, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator

Percy Dearmer, who was on the Anglo-Catholic side of Anglicanism, was one of the most important figures in modern English hymnody.  He, for example, served on the committee for The English Hymnal (1906), to which he contributed seven original texts and ten translations.  Dearmer also edited Songs of Praise (1925), which included twenty-three of his original texts, as well as four texts by his son Geoffrey (1893-1996)Songs of Praise, Expanded (1931) and its companion volume, Songs of Praise Discussed (1933) followed.

Dearmer came from an artistic family.  His father, Thomas, was an artist.  Our saint, educated at Westminster School, overseas, and at Christ Church, Oxford (B.A., 1890; M.A., 1896), married Mabel White (died in 1915) in 1891.  Mabel, with whom Dearmer had two sons (including Geoffrey, a poet), was an artist, novelist, playwright, and author of children’s books.  Appropriately, our saint served as chairman of the League of Arts.

Dearmer, a native of London England, became a deacon in The Church of England in 1891.  He joined the ranks of priests the following year.  He, the Secretary of the London branch of the Christian Social Union from 1891 to 1912, served at Berkeley Chapel, Mayfair (1891-1897) then St. Mark’s, Marylebone (1897-1901) then St. Mary’s, Primrose Hill (1901-1915).  During World War I he was the chaplain to the British Red Cross in Serbia.  Our saint, who married Mary Knowles (the eventual mother of two daughters and a son with him) in 1916, lectured around the world.  From 1919 to 1936 Dearmer was Professor of Ecclesiastical Art at King’s College, London.  Starting in 1931 he doubled as the Canon of Westminster.

Dearmer, aged 69 years, died on May 29, 1936.

Dearmer wrote, edited, or contributed to 61 works, including the following:

  1. The Parson’s Handbook (1899);
  2. The English Liturgy (1903);
  3. The Server’s Handbook (1904);
  4. The Prayer Book, What It Is (1907);
  5. The English Carol Book (1913);
  6. The Necessity of Art (1924); and
  7. The Oxford Book of Carols (1928).

Dearmer left an enduring and impressive legacy in the overlapping fields of liturgy and hymnody.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

DECEMBER 9, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF KARL BARTH, SWISS REFORMED MINISTER, THEOLOGIAN, AND BIBLICAL SCHOLAR; FATHER OF MARKUS BARTH, SWISS LUTHERAN MINISTER AND BIBLICAL SCHOLAR

THE FEAST OF GEORG FRIEDRICH HELLSTROM, DUTCH-GERMAN MORAVIAN MUSICIAN, COMPOWER, AND EDUCATOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT PETER FOURIER, “THE GOOD PRIEST OF MATTAINCOURT;” AND SAINT ALIX LE CLERC, FOUNDRESS OF THE CONGREGATION OF NOTRE DAME OF CANONESSES REGULAR OF SAINT AUGUSTINE

THE FEAST OF SAINT WALTER CISZEK, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY PRIEST AND POLITICAL PRISONER

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Percy Dearmer and others, who have composed and translated hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of St. Bona of Pisa (May 29)   Leave a comment

Above:  Northwestern Spain

Scanned by Kenneth Randolph Taylor from Hammond’s World Atlas–Classics Edition (1957)

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SAINT BONA OF PISA (CIRCA 1156-CIRCA 1207)

Roman Catholic Mystic and Pilgrim

St. Bona of Pisa was a mystic, visionary, and pilgrim from her childhood.  The native of Pisa, Italy, born circa 1156, reported seeing visions of Jesus, Mary, and St. James the Greater when she was a girl.  Our saint joined the Third Order of Augustinians at the age of 10 years.  St. Bona made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, where her father was a soldier between the Second and Third Crusades, when she was 14 years old.  On the way back home she became a prisoner of Muslim pirates, from whom fellow Pisans rescued her.  St. Bona, who made a pilgrimage to Rome and nine pilgrimages to Santiago de Compostela, was a guide for other pilgrims to that site in Galicia, Spain.  She died at Pisa in 1207, shortly after returning from her ninth pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela.

St. Bona is the patron saint of flight attendants, couriers, guides, pilgrims, travelers, and the city of Pisa.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

DECEMBER 9, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF KARL BARTH, SWISS REFORMED MINISTER, THEOLOGIAN, AND BIBLICAL SCHOLAR; FATHER OF MARKUS BARTH, SWISS LUTHERAN MINISTER AND BIBLICAL SCHOLAR

THE FEAST OF GEORG FRIEDRICH HELLSTROM, DUTCH-GERMAN MORAVIAN MUSICIAN, COMPOWER, AND EDUCATOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT PETER FOURIER, “THE GOOD PRIEST OF MATTAINCOURT;” AND SAINT ALIX LE CLERC, FOUNDRESS OF THE CONGREGATION OF NOTRE DAME OF CANONESSES REGULAR OF SAINT AUGUSTINE

THE FEAST OF SAINT WALTER CISZEK, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY PRIEST AND POLITICAL PRISONER

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O God, you have brought us near to an innumerable company of angels,

and to the spirits of just men made perfect:

Grant us during our earthly pilgrimage to abide in their fellowship,

and in our heavenly country to become partakers of their joy;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with

you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Wisdom of Solomon 3:1-9

Psalm 34 or 34:15-22

Philippians 4:4-9

Luke 6:17-23

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 725

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Posted December 9, 2017 by neatnik2009 in May 29, Saints of 1100-1199, Saints of 1200-1299

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Feast of Jiri Tranovsky (May 29)   1 comment

Religions in Central Europe 1618

Above:  Religions in Central Europe, 1618

Image in the Public Domain

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JIRI TRANOVSKY (APRIL 9, 1592-MAY 29, 1637)

Luther of the Slavs and Father of Slovak Hymnody

Also known as Juraj Tranovsky, Jerzy Trzanowski, Georgios Tranoscius, and George Tranoscius

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Jiri Tranovsky comes to my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days via Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), the service book-hymnal of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada (ELCIC).

Tranovsky was ethnically Polish.  The native of Teschen, Silesia (now Cieszyn, Poland), entered the world on April 9, 1592.  He studied at Guben (now in Germany) and, from 1605 to 1607, at Kolberg (now Kolobrzeg, Poland) then, starting in 1607, at the University of Wittenberg, where he began to write poetry in Latin and Czech.  He traveled to Bohemia and Silesia in 1612.  Then our saint taught at St. Nicholas Gymnasium, Prague, before serving as rector of a school in Holesov, Moravia (now in the Czech Republic), from 1613 to 1615.  In 1615 and 1616 Tranovsky taught in the school at Mezirici (now in the Czech Republic), where he also led the local singing society.

Tranovsky was a Lutheran minister.  Following his ordination at Mezirici in 1616 he served in that town until 1621.  The turmoil of the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648) and the official religious intolerance of King Ferdinand II of Bohemia and Hungary (reigned 1617-1637; Holy Roman Emperor, 1619-1637), persecutor of Protestantism, forced Tranovsky and his congregation into exile in 1621.  1624 was a terrible year for the flock and its shepherd.  Wartime conditions contributed to a plague, so Tranovsky had to bury three of his children and half of his congregation.  Later that year authorities imprisoned our saint.  They exiled him to Silesia the following year.  There he became the court preacher to the castle in Bielitz (now Bielsko, Poland).  Wartime conditions forced Tranovsky to move again in 1628, so he became the court preacher to Orava Castle (now in Oravsky Podzamok, Slovakia).  Our saint’s health was failing.

Tranovsky translated and wrote texts.  In 1620 he translated the Augsburg Confession into Czech.  Eight years later he was hard at work on Odarum Sacrarum sive Hymnorum (1629), a hymnal containing 150 Latin texts for congregational singing.  Tranovsky included several original tunes.  From 1631 to his death in 1637 he was the senior pastor at Liptovsky Svaty Mikulas, Upper Hungary (now Liptovsky Mikulas, Slovakia), where he wrote his masterpieces.  Phiala Odoromentorum (A Vial of Sweet Incense, 1635), was a prayer book.  The Cithara Sanctorum (Harp of the Saints, 1636), also known as the Transocius, was a hymnal containing 414 hymns, 150 of which were his.  This volume became the basis of Czech and Slovak Lutheran hymnody.

Tranovsky suspected that he would die before the age of 50 years.  He was correct, for he died on May 29, 1637, aged 45 years.

Most of Tranovsky’s hymns do not exist in any English-language translation.  I have found a few, however, and added two–“Come, Rejoicing, Praises Voicing” and “Christ the Lord to Us is Born, Hallelujah“–to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  I have found several others in translations by Jaroslav Jan Vajda (1919-2008) in current Lutheran hymnals:

  1. “Let Our Gladness Banish Sadness” (1960), in the Lutheran Service Book (2006);
  2. “Your Heart, O God, is Grieved” (1970), in Hymnal Supplement 98 (1998), Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), and the Lutheran Service Book (2006); and
  3. “Make Songs of Joy to Christ, Our Head” (1978), in the Lutheran Service Book (2006).

I have also found a Vajda translation of an anonymous text from the Tranoscius (1636) in slightly older Lutheran hymnals.  The Worship Supplement (1969) and the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978) contain “God, My Lord, My Strength, My Place of Hiding” (1969).

I wonder what treasures among Tranovsky’s hymnody remain untranslated into English.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 25, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE CONVERSION OF SAINT PAUL THE APOSTLE

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Jiri Tranovsky and others, who have translated hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Proper 4, Year C   Leave a comment

roman-centurion-window

Above:  Design Drawing for Stained Glass for Memorial Window with Centurion for Church of the Good Shepherd in Raleigh, North Carolina

Image Source = Library of Congress

Divine Inclusion and Human Exclusion

The Sunday Closest to June 1

The Second Sunday after Pentecost

MAY 29, 2016

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The Assigned Readings:

1 Kings 18:20-21 (22-29), 30-39 and Psalm 96

or 

1 Kings 8:22-23, 41-43 and Psalm 96

then 

Galatians 1:1-12

Luke 7:1-10

The Collect:

Almighty and merciful God, it is only by your gift that your faithful people offer you true and laudable service: Grant that we may run without stumbling to obtain your heavenly promises; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

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Some Related Posts:

Proper 4, Year A:

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2010/11/15/proper-4-year-a/

Proper 4, Year B:

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2011/07/22/proper-4-year-b/

Prayer of Praise and Adoration:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2011/03/05/prayer-of-praise-and-adoration-for-the-second-sunday-after-pentecost/

Prayer of Confession:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2011/03/05/prayer-of-confession-for-the-second-sunday-after-pentecost/

Prayer of Dedication:

http://gatheredprayers.wordpress.com/2011/03/05/prayer-of-dedication-for-the-second-sunday-after-pentecost/

Luke 7:

http://lenteaster.wordpress.com/2012/06/09/devotion-for-the-sixteenth-and-seventeenth-days-of-easter-lcms-daily-lectionary/

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2011/03/24/week-of-proper-19-monday-year-1/

Galatians 1:

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2011/10/30/week-of-proper-22-monday-year-2-and-week-of-proper-22-tuesday-year-2/

1 Kings 8:

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2011/10/09/proper-16-year-b/

1 Kings 18:

http://ordinarytimedevotions.wordpress.com/2011/08/06/week-of-proper-5-wednesday-year-2/

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A summary of the readings follows:  There is only one God, from whom people (including Elijah and Paul) have received revelations.  The message of God is for all people, who are supposed to revere the deity.  And sometimes one finds deep faith in unexpected quarters.

That last statement, a reference to the Gospel reading, appeals to me on one level and humbles me on another.  I have spent much of my life feeling like a heretic in the Bible Belt.  (I AM A HERETIC IN THE BIBLE BELT.)  Sometimes even Episcopal Church congregations–where I, one who enjoys asking probing questions, exploring possibilities, and becoming comfortable with uncertainty and ambiguity, should find a safe haven–have not always provided safe havens. And so I have been as the Roman centurion–a goy one way another.  Yet God accepts me, however heretical I might be.

Nevertheless I also find a reason for caution and humility.  Which populations do I mark unjustly (without knowing that I am doing this unjustly) as beyond the pale theologically?  Whom do I mistake as a member of a den of heretics?  I am clearly not a Universalist; there are theological lines which  God has established.  There is truth–revealed truth–and many people occupy the wrong side of it.  But do I know where those lines are?  How much do I really know, and how much do I just think I know?  And who will surprise me by being present in Heaven?

I tell myself to mind my own business, to be the best and most conscientious person I can be.  I tell myself to practice compassion and to leave judgment to God.  Sometimes I do.  And I know better the rest of the time.  Thus, aware of this failing of mine, I read Luke 7:1-10 with humility.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 4, 2012 COMMON ERA

INDEPENDENCE DAY (U.S.A.)

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Posted November 30, 2012 by neatnik2009 in May 29, Revised Common Lectionary Year C

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Feast of the First Book of Common Prayer, 1549 (May-June)   Leave a comment

Above:  Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury

THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER (1549)

Effective on the Day of Pentecost, June 9, 1549, During the Reign of King Edward VI

The Episcopal Church specifies that one observes this feast properly on a weekday after the Day of Pentecost.

The 1549 Book of Common Prayer, which, along with many of its successors, is available at http://justus.anglican.org/resources/bcp/, was mainly the product of Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury and poet extraordinaire.  He translated texts from various sources, ranging from Greek liturgies to German Lutheran rites to the Roman Catholic missal and the Liturgy of the Hours.  Along the way Cranmer quoted the Bible extensively.  Thus it is a common Anglican and Episcopal joke to say that the Bible quotes the Prayer Book.

My first encounter with the Book of Common Prayer was indirect, so indirect in fact that I was not aware of it.  I grew up United Methodist in the era of the 1966 Methodist Hymnal, which is far superior to the 1989 United Methodist Hymnal.  The ritual in the 1966 Hymnal was that of its 1935 and 1905 predecessors, that is, based on the 1662 Book of Common Prayer.   So, when I saw the 1979 Prayer Book and read Holy Eucharist Rite I, I recognized it immediately, down to the Prayer of Humble Access.

Now I an Episcopalian.  As someone told me early this year, I left the church that John Wesley made and joined the church that made John Wesley.  The rhythms of the 1979 Prayer Book have sunk into my synapses and my soul.  I also use A New Zealand Prayer Book (1989), of  The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia, which breaks out from parts of tradition creatively and beautifully while standing within the Prayer Book tradition.

I have become a person of the Prayer Book, thankfully.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 24, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT BARTHOLOMEW, APOSTLE AND MARTYR

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Almighty and everliving God, whose servant Thomas Cranmer, with others, restored the language of the people in the prayers of your Church:  Make us always thankful for this heritage; and help us to pray in the Spirit and with the understanding, that we may worthily magnify your holy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Kings 8:54-61

Psalm 33:1-5, 20-21

Acts 2:38-42

John 4:21-24

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010)