Archive for the ‘May 7’ Category

Feast of Saints Rosa Venerini and Lucia Filippini (May 7)   2 comments

Above:  The Flag of the Vatican

Image in the Public Domain

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

SAINT ROSA VENERINI (FEBRUARY 9, 1656-MAY 7, 1728)

Foundress of the Venerini Sisters

++++++++++++

SAINT LUCIA FILIPPINI (JANUARY 13, 1672-MARCH 25, 1732)

Foundress of the Religious Teachers Filippini

Her feast transferred from March 25

++++++++++++

I feel so nailed to the Will of God that nothing else matters, neither death nor life.  I want what He wants; I want to serve Him as much as pleases Him and no more.

–Saint Rosa Venerini

++++++++++++

The two saints I celebrate in this post did much to address the problems of the financial, material, cultural, and spiritual poverty of girls and women, first in parts of Italy.

Above:  Saint Rosa Venerini

Image in the Public Domain

St. Rosa Venerini (1656-1728), the third of four children of Goffredo Venerini (a physician at Viterbo) and Marzia Zampichetti Venerini, struggled with her divine vocation for years, despite strong support from her family.  At the age of seven years our saint made a vow to consecrate her life to God.  She struggled with that promise and with temptations during her youth.  In the Autumn of 1676 the 20-year-old Rosa, with the encouragement of her father, entered the Dominican Convent of St. Catherine.  An aunt, Anna Cecilia, taught her how to listen for God in meditation and silence.  After a few months, however, Rosa left St. Catherine’s, for her father had died.  Later Domenico, her 27-year-old brother, died.  Then our saint’s mother died.  Eventually a sister, Maria Maddalena, married, leaving Rosa at home with only the fourth child, her younger brother, Orazio, aged 24 years.

The turning point in Venerini’s discernment process started in May 1684.  That month she began to host a rosary prayer group for girls and women in her home.  Our saint noticed the varieties of poverty of these females.  Their spiritual poverty, Venerini decided, was especially alarming.  She therefore devoted the rest of her life to improving the Christian formation of young women.

Thus it came to pass that, on August 30, 1685, Venerini left home and founded her first school, the first public school for girls in Italy, with the assistance of two friends, Geroloma Coluzzelli and Porzia Bacci, and the approval of Urbano Cardinal Sacchetti, the Bishop of Viterbo.  There was strong opposition.  Some people, for example, took offense at our saint’s boldness.  How dare a woman do such a thing, they argued.  Also, some priests considered to be their sole province.

Nevertheless, the work of the Venerini Sisters prospered, due in part to the support of bishops.  From 1692 to 1694 alone, the Venerini Sisters founded ten schools in Monefiascone and the villages around Lake Bolsena.  They opened more schools in other parts of Italy, arriving in Rome in 1713.  Three years later, Pope Clement XI and eight cardinals visited a Venerini school in the Eternal City.  His Holiness said,

Signora Rosa, you are doing that which we cannot do.  We thank you very much because with these schools you will sanctify Rome.

Venerini died at Rome on May 7, 1728.  She was 72 years old.  Our saint had established 40 schools.

The order has expanded its work around the world.

Pope Pius XII declared Venerini a Venerable in 1949 then a Blessed three years later.  Pope Benedict XVI canonized her in 2006.

Above:  Saint Lucia Filippini

Image in the Public Domain

St. Lucia Filippini, born in Cornetto, Tuscany, on January 13, 1672, became a Venerini Sister then established her own order.  Filippini, orphaned at the age of six years, grew up in the home of an aunt and an uncle.  Our saint, devout from an early age, worked with St. Rosa Venerini, who entrusted the task of training schoolmistresses to her.  St. Lucia also directed Venerini schools.  In 1707 Pope Clement XI called Filippini to Rome, where she founded the first school of the Religious Teachers Filippini, devoted to the education of young girls.  When our saint died at the age of 60 years on March 25 (the Feast of the Annunciation), 1732, she had founded 52 schools.

Pope Pius XI declared our saint a Blessed in 1926 then canonized her four years later.

The influence of an educator is great and mostly indirect.  He or she has direct influence on pupils, obviously, and they influence others, who influence more people, et cetera.  People pass down lessons from generation to generation.

Sts. Rosa Venerini and Lucia Filippini therefore influenced a countless host.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

OCTOBER 12, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF MARTIN DOBER, MORAVIAN BISHOP AND HYMN WRITER; JOHANN LEONHARD DOBER, MORAVIAN MISSIONARY AND BISHOP; AND ANNA SCHINDLER DOBER, MORAVIAN MISSIONARY AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDITH CAVELL, NURSE AND MARTYR

THE FEAST OF SAINT KENNETH OF SCOTLAND, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY

THE FEAST OF SAINT NECTARIUS OF CONSTANTINOPLE, ARCHBISHOP

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served,

and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all to whom

the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Advertisements

Feast of Harriet Starr Cannon (May 7)   1 comment

Above:  Harriet Starr Cannon

Image in the Public Domain

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

HARRIET STARR CANNON (MAY 7, 1823-MARCH 29, 1896)

Foundress of the Community of Saint Mary

Harriet Starr Cannon founded the Community of Saint Mary (initially the Sisters of Saint Mary), the first stable religious community for women in The Episcopal Church, in 1865.  This new order was quite controversial in the denomination at the time.  Was it a Papist threat to the Protestant purity of The Episcopal Church?  That was what many critics alleged?

Cannon was not religious until the 1850s.  She and her older sister, Catherine Ann, were natives of Charleston, South Carolina.  There, on May 7, 1823, Harriet entered the world.  The girls’ parents died of yellow fever when Harriet was 17 months old.  An aunt with five children in her household already raised the sisters in Bridgeport, Connecticut.  Harriet lost an eye in an accident, but had generally happy childhood.  Not surprisingly, our saint was close to her older sister, who married then moved to California in 1851.  The plan was for Harriet to join her there.  Nevertheless, in 1855, as Harriet was preparing to leave for the West Coast, Catherine Ann died, leaving Harriet feeling alone.

Harriet, thrown into a crisis, emerged and devoted the rest of her life to God.  In 1856, in New York City, she joined the Sisterhood of the Holy Communion (defunct in 1940), under the direction of William Augustus Muhlenberg and Anne Ayres.  Our saint worked as a nurse to the poor at St. Luke’s Hospital.  In 1863 conflict within the Sisterhood led to Cannon and three other sisters leaving the order.

That departure was the prelude to the birth of a new order, the Sisters (later Community) of Saint Mary.  Horatio Potter, the Bishop of New York, received Cannon, Jane Haight, Mary Heartt, Amelia Asten, and Sarah Bridge as the first five sisters of the new order on February 2, 1865.  Our saint served as the first superior of the order, which established institutions (hospitals, convents, schools, mission houses, and orphanages) from Peekstill, New York (the site of the motherhouse) to Kenosha, Wisconsin, to Memphis, Tennessee.  The deaths of Sisters Constance, Thecla, Ruth, and Frances, four of the six Martyrs of Memphis, during an outbreak of yellow fever in Memphis while ministering to victims of the disease in August-October 1878 decreased hostility to the renewal of monasticism within The Episcopal Church.  The legacies of these Martyrs of Memphis included the expanded work of the Sisters/Community of Saint Mary and the founding of the Community of Saint John the Baptist (1881), the Sisterhood of the Holy Nativity (1882), the Community of the Transfiguration (1898), and the Order of Saint Anne (1910).

When Cannon died, aged 72 years, on March 29, 1896, her order had grown to 104 sisters.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 26, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF FREDERICK WILLIAM FABER, ENGLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF ELIZA SCUDDER, U.S. UNITARIAN THEN EPISCOPALIAN HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF JOHN BYROM, ANGLICAN THEN QUAKER POET AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF WILSON CARLILE, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND FOUNDER OF THE CHURCH ARMY

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Gracious God, you called Mother Harriet and her companions

to revive the religious life in the Episcopal Church by founding

the religious community of Saint Mary, and to dedicate their lives to you:

Grant that, after their example, we may ever surrender ourselves to the revelation of your holy will;

through our Savior Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with

you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

2 Esdras 2:15-24

Psalm 131

Hebrews 13:1-2, 5-8, 15-16

Mark 9:33-37

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 361

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of Joseph Armitage Robinson (May 7)   Leave a comment

08952v

Above:  Wells Cathedral, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-08952

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

JOSEPH ARMITAGE ROBINSON (JANUARY 9, 1858-MAY 7, 1933)

Anglican Dean, Scholar, and Hymn Writer

Joseph Armitage Robinson, or J. Armitage Robinson, as he listed his name on the title pages of books, was a priest, a scholar, and a good writer.  He entered this world at Keynsham, near Bath, England, on January 9, 1858.  Robinson attended Christ’s College Cambridge, an institution with which he maintained a long-term relationship.  He earned his Bachelor of Arts (1881), Master of Arts (1884), Bachelor of Divinity (1891), and Doctor of Divinity (1896) degrees there, was the Dean there from 1884 to 1888, and became an Honorary Fellow there in 1904.

Robinson, who became a deacon of the Church of England in 1881 and a priest the following year, led the following career:

  1. Domestic Chaplain to the Bishop of Durham (1882-1884);
  2. Dean of Christ’s College, Cambridge (1884-1888);
  3. Examining Chaplain to the Bishop of Bath and Wells (1888-1891);
  4. Assistant Curate, Great St. Mary’s, Cambridge (1888-1892);
  5. Norrisian Professor of Divinity, Cambridge (1893-1899);
  6. Rector, St. Margaret’s, Westminster (1899-1900);
  7. Canon of Westminster (1900-1902);
  8. Dean of Westminster (1902-1911);
  9. Lord High Almoner, hence responsible for distributing alms to the poor (1906-1933);
  10. Dean of Wells (1911-1933); and
  11. Knight Commander of the Royal Victorian Order (1932-1933).

Robinson wrote one hymn I have located and added to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.

Robinson was an expert in church patristics and Biblical studies.  In 1891 he became the founding editor of Cambridge Texts and Studies.  His published output, as I found it at archive.org, was staggering in its impressiveness and included the following:

  1. A Collation of the Athos Codex of the Shepherd of Hermas (1888);
  2. The Passion of S. Perpetua (1891);
  3. Texts and Studies:  Contributions to Biblical and Patristic Literature (1891-1902)–Volumes 1, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8a8b8c, and 8d;
  4. The Gospel According to Peter, and the Revelation of Peter:  Two Lectures (1892)–with Montague Rhodes James;
  5. An appendix in The Apology of Aristides on Behalf of the Christians (1893);
  6. The Philocalia of Origen (1893);
  7. An appendix in The Ministry of Deaconesses, by Deaconess Cecilia Robinson (1898);
  8. Jerusalem Which Above is Free (1899), a sermon;
  9. Not to Be Served, But to Serve (1899), a sermon;
  10. A Sight of Christ (1899), a sermon;
  11. Taught of God to Love One Another (1899), a sermon;
  12. Holy Ground:  Three Sermons on the War in South Africa (1900);
  13. A chapter in Hugh Price Hughes As We Knew Him (1902);
  14. The Study of the Gospels (1902);
  15. Some Thoughts on the Incarnation (1903);
  16. St. Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians:  A Revised Text and Translation with Exposition and Notes (1904);
  17. Some Thoughts on Inspiration (1905);
  18. Some Thoughts on the Athanasian Creed (1905);
  19. The Historical Character of St. John’s Gospel (1908);
  20. The History of Westminster Abbey (1909);
  21. The Manuscripts of Westminster Abbey (1909)–with Montague Rhodes James;
  22. The Abbot’s House at Westminster (1911);
  23. The Advent Hope in Paul’s Epistles (1911);
  24. Gilbert Crispin, Abbot of Westminster:  A Study of the Abbey Under Norman Rule (1911);
  25. An Unrecognized Westminster Chronicler, 1381-1394 (1912);
  26. Thoughts for Teachers of the Bible (1914);
  27. The Saxon Bishops of Wells:  A Historical Study in the Tenth Century (1918);
  28. St. Oswald and the Church of Worcester (1919);
  29. Barnabas, Hermas, and the Didache (1920);
  30. St. Iranaeus:  The Demonstration of the Apostolic Teaching (1920);
  31. An essay in Essays on the Early History of the Church and the Ministry (1921); and
  32. Somerset Historical Essays (1921).

Robinson died at Upton Noble, Somerset, England, on May 7, 1933.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 2, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE NINTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS

THE FEAST OF JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH, COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF SABINE BARING-GOULD, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT SERAPHIM OF SAROV, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX MONK

THE FEAST OF VEDANAYAGAM SAMUEL AZARIAH, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF DORNAKAL

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Joseph Armitage Robinson and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of St. Domitian of Huy (May 7)   Leave a comment

Above:  Gaul in 561

SAINT DOMITIAN OF HUY (DIED CIRCA 560)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Tongres then Maastricht

Apostle of the Meuse Valley

I recall growing up as a United Methodist in the South Georgia Conference.  I learned about parts of church history, focusing mostly on the first century CE, the Reformation era, and Methodist beginnings forward.  This curriculum omitted most of Christian history.  One of the greatest weaknesses of much of Protestantism is insufficient historical awareness.

The life and times of St. Domitian of Huy fell into the omitted part of my childhood church history curriculum.  The Gallic-born St. Domitian served as Bishop of Tongres.  As bishop he moved his see’s headquarters to Maastricht.  He also evangelized successfully in the Meuse Valley, in modern-day Belgium, building many churches.  The saint also used his powers of persuasion to raise enough funds to help the poor during a famine, thereby easing its effects on the most vulnerable people.  The bishop, who built hospitals to meet physical needs of people, is buried at Huy, Belgium.

St. Domitian played a prominent role at the Fifth Council of Orleans (549).  That Council, among other things, condemned Nestorianism, which held that

God dwelt in Christ as in a temple, and that this in-dwelling was a result of the divine good pleasure. (Linwood Urban, A Short History of Christian Thought, Revised and Expanded Edition, New York:  Oxford University Press, 1995, page 85)

Thus, in Nestorian theology, Mary was the Mother of Christ, not the Mother of God.  (She was, of course, the Mother of God!)  The Council also condemened the Monophysite heresy, which, according to its spokesman, Eutyches, held that

…before the union our Lord was of two natures, but after that union I confess one nature. (quoted in Linwood Urban, A Short History of Christian Thought, page 86)

In other words, the divine nature of Christ absorbed his human nature.  (That was–and is–erroneous.)  In less exciting news, the Council also condemned the selling of church offices and decreed that a bishop had to have been a member of the clergy for at least one year prior to the election to the episcopate.  (The condemnation of simony makes sense to me, but restricting the episcopate to the clergy is not always a good idea.)  We twenty-first Christians might take certain doctrines for granted, for they are part of our inheritance.  But may we never forget that saints such as Domitian of Huy helped to establish them as such.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 22, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT DEOGRATIAS, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF CARTHAGE

THE FEAST OF JAMES DEKOVEN, EPISCOPAL PRIEST

THE FEAST OF SAINTS NICHOLAS OWEN, THOMAS GARNET, MARK BARKWORTH, EDWARD OLDCORNE, AND RALPH ASHLEY, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYRS

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Almighty God, you gave to your servant Saint Domitian of Huy

special gifts of grace to understand and teach the truth as it is in Christ Jesus:

Grant that by this teaching we may know you, the one true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Proverbs 3:1-7

Psalm 119:89-96

1 Corintians 3:5-11

Matthew 13:47-52

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 721

Saints’ Days and Holy Days for May   Leave a comment

Rosa Chinensis

Image Source = Sakurai Midori

1 (PHILIP AND JAMES, APOSTLES AND MARTYRS)

2 (Alexander of Alexandria, Patriarch; and Athanasius of Alexandria, Patriarch and “Father of Orthodoxy”)

  • Charles Silvester Horne, English Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Julia Bulkley Cady Cory, U.S. Presbyterian Hymn Writer
  • Sigismund of Burgundy, King; Clotilda, Frankish Queen; and Clodoald, Frankish Prince and Abbot

3 (Caroline Chisholm, English Humaniarian and Social Reformer)

  • Marie-Léonie Paradis, Foundress of the Little Sisters of the Holy Family
  • Maura and Timothy of Antinoe, Martyrs, 286
  • Tomasso Acerbis, Capuchin Friar

4 (Ceferino Jimenez Malla, Spanish Romani Martyr)

  • Jean-Martin Moyë, Roman Catholic Priest, Missionary in China, and Founder of the Sisters of Divine Providence and the Christian Virgins
  • John Houghton, Robert Lawrence, Augustine Webster, Humphrey Middlemore, William Exmew, and Sebastian Newdigate, Roman Catholic Martyrs

5 (Charles William Schaeffer, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Historian, Theologian, and Liturgist)

  • Edmund Ignatius Rice, Founder of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools of Ireland and the Congregation of Presentation Brothers
  • Friedrich von Hügel, Roman Catholic Independent Scholar and Philosopher
  • Honoratus of Arles and Hilary of Arles, Roman Catholic Bishops, and Venantius of Modon and Caprasius of Lerins, Roman Catholic Hermits

6 (Anna Rosa Gattorno, Foundress of the Institute of the Daughters of Saint Anne, Mother of Mary Immaculate)

  • Tobias Clausnitzer, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Willibald of Eichstatt and Lullus of Mainz, Roman Catholic Bishops; Walburga of Heidenhelm, Roman Catholic Abbess; Petronax of Monte Cassino, Winnebald of Heidenhelm, Wigbert of Fritzlar, and Sturmius of Fulda, Roman Catholic Abbots; and Sebaldus of Vincenza, Roman Catholic Hermit and Missionary
  • Clarence Dickinson, U.S. Presbyterian Organist and Composer

7 (Domitian of Huy, Roman Catholic Archbishop)

  • Harriet Starr Cannon, Foundress of the Community of Saint Mary
  • Joseph Armitage Robinson, Anglican Dean, Scholar, and Hymn Writer
  • Rosa Venerini, Foundress of the Venerini Sisters; mentor of Lucia Filippini, Foundress of the Religious Teachers Filippini

8 (Juliana of Norwich, Mystic and Spiritual Writer)

  • Acacius of Byzantium, Martyr, 303
  • Magdalena of Canossa, Foundress of the Daughters of Charity and the Sons of Charity
  • Peter of Tarentaise, Roman Catholic Archbishop

9 (Stefan Grelewski and his brother, Kazimierz Grelewski, Polish Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs, 1941 and 1942)

  • Dietrich Buxtehude, Lutheran Organist and Composer
  • Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin, Cofounders of the Catholic Worker Movement
  • Thomas Toke Lynch, English Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

10 (Enrico Rebuschini, Roman Catholic Priest and Servant of the Sick; and his mentor, Luigi Guanella, Founder of the Daughters of Saint Mary of Providence, the Servants of Charity, and the Confraternity of Saint Joseph)

  • Anna Laetitia Waring, Humanitarian and Hymn Writer; and her uncle, Samuel Miller Waring, Hymn Writer
  • Ivan Merz, Croatian Roman Catholic Intellectual
  • John Goss, Anglican Church Composer and Organist; and William Mercer, Anglican Priest and Hymn Translator

11 (Henry Knox Sherrill, Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church)

  • John James Moment, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Matteo Ricci, Roman Catholic Missionary
  • Matthêô Lê Van Gam, Vietnamese Roman Catholic Martyr

12 (Germanus I of Constantinople, Patriarch of Constantinople and Defender of Icons)

  • Christian Friedrich Hasse, German-British Moravian Composer and Educator
  • Gregory of Ostia, Roman Catholic Abbot, Cardinal, and Legate; and Dominic of the Causeway, Roman Catholic Hermit
  • Roger Schütz, Founder of the Taizé Community

13 (Henri Dominique Lacordaire, French Roman Catholic Priest, Dominican, and Advocate for the Separation of Church and State)

  • Frances Perkins, United States Secretary of Labor
  • Gemma of Goriano Sicoli, Italian Roman Catholic Anchoress
  • Sylvester II, Bishop of Rome

14 (Francis Makemie, Father of American Presbyterianism and Advocate for Religious Toleration)

  • Carthage the Younger, Irish Abbot-Bishop
  • Maria Dominica Mazarello, Cofounder of the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians
  • Victor the Martyr and Corona of Damascus, Martyrs in Syria, 165

15 (JUNIA AND ANDRONICUS, COWORERS OF SAINT PAUL THE APOSTLE)

16 (Andrew Fournet and Elizabeth Bichier, Cofounders of the Daughters of the Cross; and Michael Garicoits, Founder of the Priests of the Sacred Heart of Betharram)

  • John Nepomucene, Bohemian Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr
  • Martyrs of the Sudan
  • Ubaldo Baldassini, Roman Catholic Bishop of Gubbio

17 (Thomas Bradbury Chandler, Anglican Priest; his son-in-law, John Henry Hobart, Episcopal Bishop of New York; and his grandson, William Hobart Hare, Apostle to the Sioux and Episcopal Missionary Bishop of Niobrara then South Dakota)

  • Caterina Volpicelli, Foundress of the Servants of the Sacred Heart; Ludovico da Casoria, Founder of the Gray Friars of Charity and Cofounder of the Gray Sisters of Saint Elizabeth; and Giulia Salzano, Foundress of the Congregation of the Catechetical Sisters of the Sacred Heart
  • Charles Hamilton Houston and Thurgood Marshall, Attorneys and Civil Rights Activists
  • Donald Coggan, Archbishop of Canterbury

18 (Maltbie Davenport Babcock, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Humaitarian, and Hymn Writer)

  • John I, Bishop of Rome
  • Mary McLeod Bethune, African-American Educator and Social Activist
  • Stanislaw Kubski, Polish Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr

19 (Jacques Ellul, French Reformed Theologian and Sociologist)

  • Celestine V, Bishop of Rome
  • Dunstan of Canterbury, Abbot of Glastonbury and Archbishop of Canterbury
  • Ivo of Kermartin, Roman Catholic Attorney, Priest, and Advocate for the Poor

20 (Alcuin of York, Abbot of Tours)

  • Columba of Rieti and Osanna Andreasi, Dominican Mystics
  • John Eliot, “The Apostle to the Indians”
  • Rose Hawthorne Lathrop, Foundress of the Dominican Sisters of Hawthorne

21 (Christian de Chargé and His Companions, Martyrs of Tibhirine, Algeria, 1996)

  • Eugene de Mazenod, Bishop of Marseilles and Founder of the Congregation of the Missionaries, Oblates of Mary Immaculate
  • Franz Jägerstätter, Austrian Roman Catholic Conscientious Objector and Martyr, 1943
  • Joseph Addison and Alexander Pope, English Poets

22 (Frederick Hermann Knubel, President of the United Lutheran Church in America)

  • Georg Gottfried Muller, German-American Moravian Minister and Composer
  • John Forest and Thomas Abel, English Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs, 1538 and 1540
  • Julia of Corsica, Martyr at Corsica, 620

23  (Ivo of Chartres, Roman Catholic Bishop)

24 (Nicolaus Selnecker, German Lutheran Minister, Theologian, and Hymn Writer)

  • Jackson Kemper, Episcopal Missionary Bishop
  • Edith Mary Mellish (a.k.a. Mother Edith), Foundress of the Community of the Sacred Name

25 (Bede of Jarrow, Roman Catholic Abbot and Father of English History)

  • Aldhelm of Sherborne, Poet, Literary Scholar, Abbot of Malmesbury, and Bishop of Sherborne
  • Madeleine-Sophie Barat, Foundress of the Society of the Sacred Heart; and Rose Philippine Duchesne, Roman Catholic Nun and Missionary
  • Mykola Tsehelskyi, Ukrainian Greek Catholic Priest and Martyr

26 (Augustine of Canterbury, Archbishop)

  • Lambert Péloguin of Vence, Roman Catholic Monk and Bishop
  • Philip Neri, the Apostle of Rome and the Founder of the Congregation of the Oratory
  • Quadratus the Apologist, Early Christian Apologist

27  (Paul Gerhardt, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer)

  • Alfred Rooker, English Congregationalist Philanthropist and Hymn Writer; and his sister, Elizabeth Rooker Parson, English Congregationalist Hymn Writer
  • Amelia Bloomer, U.S. Suffragette
  • Lojze Grozde, Slovenian Roman Catholic Martyr

28 (John H. W. Stuckenberg, German-American Minister and Academic)

  • Bernard of Menthon, Roman Catholic Priest and Archdeacon of Aosta
  • Edwin Pond Parker, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Jeremias Dencke, Silesian-American Moravian Composer and Organist; and Simon Peter and Johann Friedrich Peter, German-American Composers, Educators, Musicians, and Ministers

29 (Percy Dearmer, Anglican Canon and Translator and Author of Hymns)

  • Bona of Pisa, Roman Catholic Mystic and Pilgrim
  • Jiri Tranovsky, Luther of the Slavs and Father of Slovak Hymnody
  • Joachim Neander, German Reformed Minister and Hymn Writer

30 (Joan of Arc, Roman Catholic Visionary and Martyr)

  • Apolo Kivebulaya, Apostle to the Pygmies
  • Josephine Butler, English Feminist and Social Reformer
  • Luke Kirby, Thomas Cottam, William Filby, and Laurence Richardson, Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs

31 (VISITATION OF MARY TO ELIZABETH)

Floating

  • Ascension
  • First Book of Common Prayer, 1549

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.

 

Fourth Sunday of Easter, Year A   Leave a comment

Above:  Logo of the Moravian Church

Jesus:  Shepherd and Lamb

MAY 11, 2014

MAY 7, 2017

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Acts 2:42-47 (New Revised Standard Version):

Those who had been baptized devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and fellowship, to the breaking of bread and the prayers.

Awe came upon everyone, because many wonders and signs were being done by the apostles. All who believed were together and had all things in common; they would sell their possessions and goods and distribute the proceeds to all, as any had need. Day by day, as they spent much time together in the temple, they broke bread at home and ate their food with glad and generous hearts, praising God and having the goodwill of all the people. And day by day the Lord added to their number those who were being saved.

Psalm 23 (New Revised Standard Version):

The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want.

He makes me to lie down in green pastures;

he leads me beside still waters;

he restores my soul.

He leads me in right paths

for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk through the darkest valley,

I fear no evil;

for you are with me;

your rod and your staff–

they comfort me.

You prepare a table before me

in the presence of my enemies;

you anoint my head with oil;

my cup overflows.

Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me

all the days of my life,

and I shall dwell in the house of the LORD

my whole life long.

1 Peter 2:19-25 (New Revised Standard Version):

It is a credit to you if, being aware of God, you endure pain while suffering unjustly. If you endure when you are beaten for doing wrong, what credit is that? But if you endure when you do right and suffer for it, you have God’s approval. For to this you have been called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you should follow in his steps.

He committed no sin,

and no deceit was found in his mouth.

When he was abused, he did not return abuse; when he suffered, he did not threaten; but he entrusted himself to the one who judges justly.  He himself bore our sins in the body on the cross, so that, free from sins, we might live for righteousness; by his wounds you have been healed.  For you were going astray like sheep, but now you have returned to the guardian of your souls.

John 10:1-10 (New Revised Standard Version):

Jesus said, “Very truly, I tell you, anyone who does not enter the sheepfold by the gate but climbs in by another way is a thief and a bandit. The one who enters by the gate is the shepherd of the sheep. The gatekeeper opens the gate for him, and the sheep hear his voice. He calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. When he has brought out all his own, he goes ahead of them, and the sheep follow him because they know his voice. They will not follow a stranger, but they will run from him because they do not know the voice of strangers.” Jesus used this figure of speech with them, but they did not understand what he was saying to them.

So again Jesus said to them, “Very truly, I tell you, I am the gate for the sheep. All who came before me are thieves and bandits; but the sheep did not listen to them. I am the gate. Whoever enters by me will be saved, and will come in and go out and find pasture. The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly.”

The Collect:

O God, whose Son Jesus is the good shepherd of your people: Grant that when we hear his voice we may know him who calls us each by name, and follow where he leads; who, with you and the Holy Spirit, lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

A shepherd is  a shepherd only if there are sheep to guard and lead.

The imagery of sheep and shepherds runs throughout the Old and New Testaments.  Various groups of people–royal subjects, people in front of Jesus, et cetera–filled the role of sheep, depending on the text in question.  Depending on the passage of Scripture one considers, the shepherd was God, a king, or Jesus.  And some shepherds neglected their flocks.  Jesus, we read, is the Good Shepherd.  And he is, indeed.

We, as sheep, need a shepherd to protect us from ourselves, for we want to wander off to dangerous places.  Despite what we like to think about ourselves, we are not always the brightest crayons in the box.  Dealing with this issue effectively begins with recognizing the truth about ourselves and how much we need God, specifically in the form of Jesus.  May we acknowledge our shepherd and follow his lead.

Yet Jesus is also the victorious and worthy sacrificial lamb.  Members of the Church Triumphant wash their robes in his blood, and their robes become white. This poetic image communicates a great truth regarding atonement.  So, as the logo of the Moravian Church encourages us, may we follow the lamb.  Considering what he sacrificed and why he did it, we should reciprocate in love, devotion, and gratitude.

KRT