Archive for the ‘November 20’ Category

Feast of F. Bland Tucker (November 20)   2 comments

Above:  Christ Church, Savannah, Georgia

Image Scanned from Henry T. Malone, The Episcopal Church in Georgia (1960)

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FRANCIS BLAND TUCKER (NOVEMBER 6, 1895-JANUARY 1, 1984)

Episcopal Priest and Hymnodist

“The Dean of American Hymn Writers”

Feast Day in the Diocese of Georgia = November 19

Father F. Bland Tucker comes to this, my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via two Episcopal hymnals and the Episcopal Diocese of Georgia.

Tucker came from a family tree full of Episcopal priests, bishops, and missionaries.  He was the youngest of thirteen children of Anna Maria Washington (1851-1927) and Father Beverley Dandridge Tucker (Sr.) (1846-1930), a priest in Norfolk, Virginia, where our saint entered the world on January 6, 1895.  Tucker, Sr., went on to become the Bishop Coadjutor of Southern Virginia (1906-1911) then the Bishop of Southern Virginia (1918-1930).  One of our saint’s elder brothers was Beverley Dandridge Tucker (Jr.) (1882-1969), the Bishop of Ohio (1938-1969).  Another elder brother was Henry St. George Tucker (1874-1959), the Bishop Coadjutor of Virginia (1926-1927), the Bishop of Virginia (1927-1943), and the Presiding Bishop of the denomination (1938-1946), preceding the great Henry Knox Sherrill (1890-1980).

Our saint, descended from old Virginia families and raised in The Episcopal Church, became a courageous and reconciling figure in church and society.  He, raised on The Book of Common Prayer (1892), his favorite version of the Prayer Book, graduated from the University of Virginia (1914) then Virginia Theological Seminary (1920).  Military service during World War I interrupted his theological education.  Tucker, ordained to the diaconate in 1918 and the priesthood two years later, married Mary (Polly) Goldsborough Laird (1890-1972).  The couple had no children.

Tucker served as the rector of three parishes during forty-seven years of active ministry:

  1. St. Andrew’s Church, Lawrenceville, Virginia (1920-1925);
  2. St. John’s Church, Georgetown, District of Columbia (1925-1945); and
  3. Christ Church, Savannah, Georgia (1945-1967).

During this time our saint helped to prepare The Hymnal 1940 (1943).  His contributions to it were two original hymns and four translations.  Tucker also received a Doctor of Divinity degree from Virginia Theological Seminary in 1944.  When The Episcopal Church replaced the The Book of Common Prayer (1892) with The Book of Common Prayer (1928), our saint and his father accepted the change while not renouncing their fondness for the older Prayer Book.

Tucker spent 1945-1984 in Savannah, Georgia.  He, from 1945 to 1967 the Rector of historic Christ Church, Savannah, declined an opportunity to become the Bishop of Western North Carolina just a few months after arriving in Savannah.  He led the effort to integrate the Diocese of Georgia in 1947.  Tucker was also active in child welfare efforts in Savannah.  Furthermore, our saint openly supported civil rights in the staunchly segregated city.  In the 1960s, when many other congregations turned away those seeking to “pray in,” Tucker welcomed all who wanted to pray at Christ Church.  Also, Martin Luther King, Jr. (1939-1968), when in Savannah, spoke at Christ Church.

Tucker remained active during his retirement.  He helped to create The Book of Common Prayer (1979) and The Hymnal 1982 (1985).  When our saint heard complaints from supporters of The Book of Common Prayer (1928), he told them that he still preferred The Book of Common Prayer (1892).  He also contributed 17 hymns or parts thereof (original and translated) to the new hymnal.  (The listings for Tucker in the hymnal are 25, 26, 121, 135, 139, 164, 220, 221, 268, 269, 302, 303, 322, 356, 366, 421, 428, 443, 477, 478, 489, 530, 547, 587, 663, and 668.)

Tucker, aged 88 years, died in Savannah on January 1, 1984.  Three days later, the Savannah Morning News eulogized the great man:

…he was ahead of his time as a humanitarian.  Long before desegregation, he was on record in favor of it and a leader in accomplishing it.

Tucker was also a skilled poet who shared his literary gifts for the glory of God.

May the church never be bereft of people with such talents and moral courage.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 11, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT DIONYSIUS OF CORINTH, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF CHARLES STEDMAN NEWHALL, U.S. NATURALIST, HYMN WRITER, AND CONGREGATIONALIST AND PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER

THE FEAST OF HEINRICH THEOBALD SCHENCK, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF HENRY HALLAM TWEEDY, U.S. CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER, LITURGIST, AND HYMN WRITER

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Almighty God, we praise you for your servant F. Bland Tucker,

through whom you have called the church to its tasks and renewed its life.

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your church and proclaim the reality of your reign,

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with

you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 60

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Feast of Priscilla Lydia Sellon (November 20)   1 comment

Priscilla Lydia Sellon

Above:  Priscilla Lydia Sellon

Image in the Public Domain

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PRISCILLA LYDIA SELLON (MARCH 21, 1821-NOVEMBER 20, 1876)

A Restorer of the Religious Life of The Church of England

The description of Priscilla Lydia Sellon comes verbatim from Common Worship (2000), the most recently approved alternative to The Book of Common Prayer (1662) in The Church of England.  It is a fitting description, for Sellon’s work was pioneering in the realm of Anglican religious orders for women.

Sellon, born at Hampstead, England, on March 21, 1821, was a daughter of Commander Richard Baker Sellon of the Royal Navy.  Her mother died shortly after giving birth to her, and the commander remarried eventually.  Our saint grew up in a loving home and blended family.  She also grew up in much economic comfort.

On January 1, 1848, Sellon heard and answered a call from God.  That summons was a vocation to educate poor children in Plymouth.  Our saint, at a young age, routinely worked long days; a 16-hour-long work day was relatively light.  She founded a free industrial school for girls, a night school for boys aged 12-16 years, a school for starving children, and a home for the orphans of sailors.  Sellon also assisted female emigrants and prepared people for baptism and confirmation.  In 1849 she and a few other women founded the Society of the Sisters of Mercy of the Holy Spirit, of Davenport.  This was controversial, given the ubiquity of anti-Roman Catholic bias in English society, the English press, and The Church of England.  The Oxford Movement was so controversial that some of its opponents accused Tractarians of being in league with Satan.  That controversy over the Oxford Movement disrupted church life in the Anglican Communion for decades and framed the debate over Sellon’s humanitarian order.  In that controversy Richard, our saint’s father, offered a vigorous defense of his daughter and her religious work.

That work was essential.  Early on it included tending to patients in London suffering from cholera in 1849.  Five years later Sellon sent some members of her order to Crimea under the authority of Florence Nightingale, who supervised medical care in the context of the Crimean War.  Our saint, paralyzed in 1861, continued the good work until her death.  In 1864, for example, she answered Emma Rooke‘s request that the order commence work in the Kingdom of Hawai’i.  The mission station at Honolulu opened later that year.

Sellon died at West Malvern, England, on November 20, 1876.  She was 55 years old.  Her order has ceased to exist, but the legacy of its work is everlasting.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 14, 2016 COMMON ERA

PROPER 15:  THE THIRTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, YEAR C

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM CROFT, ANGLICAN ORGANIST AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF JONATHAN MYRICK DANIELS, EPISCOPAL SEMINARIAN AND MARTYR

THE FEAST OF MATTHIAS CLAUDIUS, GERMAN LUTHERAN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT MAXIMILIAN KOLBE, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served, and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless, love to the unloved, peace to the troubled, and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 60

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Feast of Theodore Claudius Pease (November 20)   1 comment

4a13201v

Above:  Pleasant Street from Malden Square, Malden, Massachusetts, 1906

Image Source = Library of Congress

Publisher and Copyright Claimant = Detroit Publishing Company

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-det-4a13201

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THEODORE CLAUDIUS PEASE (OCTOBER 14, 1853-NOVEMBER 20, 1893)

U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

The name of Theodore Claudius Pease might be unfamiliar to you, O reader.  If so, I understand; it was unknown to me until recently.  History records the fact that Pease wrote at least six hymns.  Within his denomination, the National Council of Congregational Churches in the United States, and its successors, the counts of his texts in official hymnals are as I have listed:

  1. The Hymnal for Use in Congregational Churches (1897)–0,
  2. The Pilgrim Hymnal (1904)–5,
  3. The Pilgrim Hymnal (1912)–4,
  4. The Pilgrim Hymnal (1931/1935)–0,
  5. Pilgrim Hymnal (1958)–0,
  6. The Hymnal of the United Church of Christ (1974)–0, and
  7. The New Century Hymnal (1995)–0.

Nevertheless, the quality of the style and content of Pease’s texts is high.

Pease, born at Poughkeepsie, New York, on October 14, 1853, became a poet and a professor.  His mother was Elmira Pease (1822-1855).  Our saint’s father was Claudius Buchanan Pease (1815-1904), a lumber merchant then a paper manufacturer.  In 1855, after Elmira died Claudius sent young Theodore to live with a grandmother and an aunt at Somers, Connecticut.  Ten years later, when our saint was about 12 years old, his father relocated to Somers.  In October 1869, at the age 16, Theodore joined the Congregational church there.  Later that year the family moved to Springfield, Massachusetts.  Pease, an avid reader from an early age, prepared for college at a home school in Somers and at Springfield High School.  At Harvard he excelled, serving as the poet of his sophomore class.  Pease, who graduated from Harvard in 1875, taught literature at the United States Naval Academy, starting in 1876, before attending seminary.  Our saint was a master of several languages (Latin, Greek, Hebrew, French, German, Spanish, and Italian) and their associated literature.  During his lifetime he read The Divine Comedy at least 50 times in the original Italian, at the pace of one canto per day.  He graduated from Andover Theological Seminary and became an ordained Congregationalist minister in 1880.  In August of that year he married Abbie Frances Cutter (1856-1928).  The couple had five children, most of whom did not live to adulthood.  A son, Arthur Stanley Pease (1881-1964), a Latinist, a professor of the classics, and an amateur botanist, served as the President of Amherst College from 1927 to 1932, however.  [Aside:  Once can read much of Arthur Stanley Pease’s writing at archive.org.]

Our saint served as the pastor of two congregations–West Lebanon Congregational Church, West Lebanon, New Hampshire (from 1880 to 1884); and First Congregational Church, Malden, Massachusetts (from 1884 to 1893).  He was, by all accounts, a dutiful and attentive minister.

Pease was an excellent stylist of the English language.  Robert C. Smith, D.D., wrote of him in the introduction to The Christian Ministry:  Its Present Claim and Attraction, and Other Writings (1894), a posthumously published volume of some of our saint’s writings, including an essay on The Divine Comedy plus poems and hymns:

His vocabulary became at once copious and select by a veritable conquest of words, acquiring them by wrestling from them the secret of their individual weight and force and by familiarity with them in their choicest uses; training his ear also to the energy or delicacy, and fixing them in memory, by often repeating them aloud.

–Pages vii-viii

I have added four of Pease’s hymns to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  Two others I have found do not address God directly.  One of these is a text (from 1890) pertaining to the Transfiguration:

Not long on Hermon’s holy height

The heavenly vision fills our sight;

We may not breathe that purer air,

Nor build our tabernacles there.

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One moment, like the favored Three,

We share that blessed company,

Where Moses and Elijah shine,

Transfigured in the light divine!

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The vision fades, the splendor dies;

The saints have sought again the skies;

The homely garb the Master wore

Is bright with sudden glow no more.

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If with the Master we would go,

Our feet must tread the vale below,

Where dark the lonely pathways wind,

The golden glory left behind.

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Where hungry souls ask One to feed,

Where wanderers cry One to lead,

Where helpless hearts in chains are bound,–

There shall the Master still be found.

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Nor Moses nor Elijah then

We long to see appear again:

No tabernacles by the way

We build the Master’s steps to stay!

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There patient bending o’er his task,–

No raiment white our eyes shall ask,

Content while through each cloud we trace

The glory of the Master’s face.

Here is an Easter hymn from 1891:

“Jesus is risen!” Lift up your glad voices!

Night’s dreary shadows are vanished away;

Hark, at the tidings the wide earth rejoices!

“Jesus is risen, is risen today!”

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Death’s iron bondage his strong hands have broken;

“Come,” speaks the angel, “behold where he lay!

Faithful the promise his own lips have spoken:

Jesus is risen, is risen today.”

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Fair by his open grave blossoms the garden;

Life follows death, bloom is born of decay,

Song after sorrow, and peace after pardon:

“Jesus is risen, is risen today!”

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Light dawns in darkness, and comfort in sadness;

Death shall no longer our spirits dismay;

Tears turn to praises, and griefs change to gladness:

“Jesus is risen, is risen today.”

Pease became the Bartlett Professor of Sacred Theology and Lecturer on Pastoral Theology at Andover Theological Seminary, Andover, Massachusetts, in June 1893.  He continued to serve as pastor of First Congregational Church, Malden, until September 3, shortly before his inauguration 17 days later.  Our saint’s time at Andover was brief, however, for typhoid fever claimed his life on November 20, 1893.  He was 40 years old.

Upon receiving his license to preach Pease said:

I have always known that I could never be anything else than a Christian minister.

He was also a fine linguist and a scholar of literature.  Pease combined intellectual excellence and rigor with deep faith in God.  He honored God with his mind.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 4, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ALFRED TENNYSON, ENGLISH POET

THE FEAST OF FREDERICK WILLIAM FOSTER, ENGLISH MORAVIAN BISHOP, LITURGIST, HYMN WRITER, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF JOHN BROWNLIE, SCOTTISH PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER, HYMN WRITER, AND TRANSLATOR OF HYMNS

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O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Theodore Claudius Pease and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

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Feast of Richard Watson Gilder (November 20)   1 comment

Church of the Ascension, NYC

Above:  Episcopal Church of the Ascension, New York, New York, the Site of Gilder’s Funeral

Image in the Public Domain

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RICHARD WATSON GILDER (FEBRUARY 8, 1844-NOVEMBER 19, 1909)

U.S. Poet, Journalist, and Social Reformer

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Richard Watson Gilder considered himself primarily a poet–a fine vocation and avocation–but he was far more than that.  He was a man who cared deeply about his fellow beings, acted accordingly, and left the world better than he found it.

Our saint entered the world at Bordentown, New Jersey, on February 8, 1844.  His father was William Henry Gilder (1812-1864), a Methodist minister and the headmaster of Bellevue Female Seminary.  The younger Gilder served as a chaplain in the First Philadelphia Artillery, U.S. Army, during the Civil War.  Then he worked as a paymaster for a railroad company.  His life’s calling resided elsewhere, however.

That calling entailed words–prose and poetry.  Shortly after the Civil War Gilder went to work for the Newark Daily Advertiser (1832-1904) before confounding the Newark Morning Register (1869-1886) with R. Newton Crane.  In 1870 our saint became the Assistant Editor of Scribner’s Monthly.  Eleven years later he became the Editor of its successor, The Century.  Along the way Gilder became a popular speaker on the lecture circuit and on college campuses, collecting honorary degrees from Harvard, Yale, and Princeton Universities.

Our saint also wrote the following volumes:

  1. The Poet and the Master, and Other Poems (1878);
  2. The Celestial Passion (1887);
  3. The New Day:  A Poem in Songs and Sonnets (1887);
  4. Lyrics, and Other Poems (1890);
  5. Two Worlds, and Other Poems (1891);
  6. Great Remembrance, and Other Poems (1893);
  7. “For the Country” (1897);
  8. In Palestine, and Other Poems (1898);
  9. Five Books of Song (1900);
  10. Poems and Inscriptions (1901);
  11. A Christmas Wreath (1903);
  12. “In the Heights” (1905);
  13. A Book of Music (1906);
  14. The Fire Divine (1907);
  15. The Poems of Richard Watson Gilder (1908);
  16. Lincoln the Leader; and Lincoln’s Genius for Expression (1909);
  17. Grover Cleveland:  A Record of Friendship (1910); and
  18. Letters of Richard Watson Gilder (1916).

Gilder also became involved in social, political and educational causes.  He advocated for effective enforcement of international copyrights, a cause which, of course, interested a writer and editor.  Our saint also chaired the Association for the Blind, the New York Tenement House Commission, and the New York Free Kindergarten Association.

Our saint died of heart disease at New York City on November 19, 1909.  The site of his funeral was the Episcopal Church of the Ascension, Manhattan.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

OCTOBER 6, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ALL CHRISTIAN BIBLE TRANSLATORS

THE FEAST OF SAINT BRUNO, FOUNDER OF THE CARTHUSIANS

THE FEAST OF HEINRICH ALBERT, GERMAN LUTHERAN COMPOSER AND POET

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM TYNDALE, BIBLE TRANSLATOR

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served,

and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 60

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Feast of Henry Francis Lyte (November 20)   1 comment

08056v

Above:  Brixham, England, Between 1890 and 1900

Published by Detroit Publishing Company, 1905

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-08056

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HENRY FRANCIS LYTE (JUNE 1, 1763-NOVEMBER 20, 1847)

Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

Henry Francis Lyte, born at Ednam, Scotland, attended Trinity College, Dublin, where he won a poetry prize three times.  He had planned originally to become a doctor yet chose instead to take Anglican Holy Orders.  He served various congregations from 1815 to 1823.  In 1818, at Marazion, Cornwall, our saint had an epiphany whereby what he already knew intellectually became real to him. Lyte sat by the death-bed of a fellow clergyman.  Our saint wrote:

…He died, I rejoice to say, happy under the belief that though he had deeply erred, there was One whose death and sufferings would atone for his delinquencies, and be accepted for all that he had incurred.  I was deeply affected for the whole matter, and brought to look at life and its issues with a different eye than before; and I began to study my Bible and preach in another manner than I had previously done.

–Quoted in Robert Guy McCutchan, Our Hymnody:  A Manual of The Methodist Hymnal, 2d. Ed. (Nashville, TN:  Abingdon Press, 1937, page 109)

From 1823 Lyte served as the Curate of Lower Brixham, Devon, a fishing village.  This was a bad assignment for a man with a fragile constitution and a sensitive spirit, yet he worked there for a quarter of a century in the vineyard of the Lord.  In 1847 our saint died at Nice, France, where he sought restoration and renewal.  His last words were

Peace, joy!

as he pointed upward.

Lyte wrote the following:

  • Tales on the Lord’s Prayer in Verse (1826);
  • Poems, Chiefly Religious (1833); and
  • The Spirit of the Psalms (1834).

I have provided the texts of some of Lyte’s hymns at my GATHERED PRAYERS blog.

When our end comes, O reader, may we, like Henry Francis Lyte, have a well-founded sense of peace and joy in God.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 25, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE INAUGURATION OF THE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST, 1957

THE FEAST OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON, POET AND NOVELIST

THE FEAST OF SAINT WILLIAM OF VERCELLI, ROMAN CATHOLIC HERMIT; AND SAINT JOHN OF MATERA, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Henry Francis Lyte and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Saints’ Days and Holy Days for November   1 comment

Topaz

Image Source = Didier Descouens

1 (ALL SAINTS)

2 (ALL SOULS/COMMEMORATION OF ALL FAITHFUL DEPARTED)

3 (Richard Hooker, Anglican Priest and Theologian)

  • Daniel Payne, African Methodist Episcopal Bishop

  • John Worthington, British Moravian Minister and Composer; John Antes, U.S. Moravian Instrument Maker, Composer, and Missionary; Benjamin Henry LaTrobe, Sr., British Moravian Bishop and Hymn Writer; Christian Ignatius LaTrobe, British Moravian Composer; Peter LaTrobe, British Moravian Bishop and Composer; Johann Christopher Pyrlaeus, Moravian Missionary and Musician; and Augustus Gottlieb Spangenberg, Moravian Bishop and Hymn Writer

  • Pierre-François Néron, French Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr in Vietnam, 1860

4 (Ludolph Ernst Schlicht, Moravian Minister, Musician, and Hymn Writer; John Gambold, Sr., British Moravian Bishop, Hymn Writer, and Translator of Hymns; and John Gambold, Jr., Moravian Composer)

  • Augustus Montague Toplady, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

  • Léon Bloy, French Roman Catholic Novelist and Social Critic; godfather of Jacques Maritain, French Roman Catholic Philosopher; husband of Raïssa Maritain, French Roman Catholic Contemplative

  • Theodore Weld, U.S. Congregationalist then Quaker Abolitionist and Educator; husband of Angelina Grimké, U.S. Presbyterian then Quaker Abolitionist, Educator, and Feminist; her sister, Sarah Grimké, U.S. Episcopalian then Quaker Abolitionist and Feminist; her nephew, Francis Grimké, African-American Presbyterian Minister and Civil Rights Activist; and his wife, Charlotte Grimké, African-American Abolitionist and Educator

5 (Bernhard Lichtenberg, German Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1943)

  • Eugene Carson Blake, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Ecumenist, and Moral Critic

  • Guido Maria Conforti, Founder of the Xavierian Missionaries

  • Hryhorii Lakota, Ukrainian Greek Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1950

6 (Christian Gregor, Father of Moravian Church Music)

  • Arthur and Lewis Tappan, U.S. Congregationalist Businessmen and Abolitionists; colleagues and financial backers of Samuel Eli Cornish and Theodore S. Wright, African-American Ministers and Abolitionists

  • Giovanni Gabrieli and Hans Leo Hassler, Composers and Organists; and Claudio Monteverdi and Heinrich Schutz, Composers and Musicians

  • Halford E. Luccock, U.S. Methodist Minister and Biblical Scholar

  • Magdeleine of Jesus, Foundress of the Little Sisters of Jesus

7 (Willibrord, Apostle to the Frisians; and Boniface of Mainz, Apostle to the Germans)

  • Benedict Joseph Flaget, Roman Catholic Bishop of Bardstown then of Louisville, Kentucky

  • Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady of the United States, and Civil Rights Activist

  • John Cawood, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

  • John Christian Frederick Heyer, Lutheran Missionary in the United States and India; Bartholomeaus Ziegenbalg, Jr., Lutheran Minister to the Tamils; and Ludwig Nommensen, Lutheran Missionary to Sumatra and Apostle to the Batak

8 (John Duns Scotus, Scottish Roman Catholic Priest and Theologian)

  • Elizabeth of the Trinity, French Roman Catholic Nun, Mystic, and Religious Writer

  • Johann von Staupitz, Martin Luther’s Spiritual Mentor

  • John Caspar Mattes, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Liturgist

  • Pambo of Nitria, Ammonius of Skete, Palladius of Galatia, Macarius of Egypt, Macarius of Alexandria, and Pishoy, Desert Fathers; Evagrius of Pontus, Monk and Scholar; Melania the Elder, Desert Mother; Rufinus of Aquileia, Monk and Theologian; Didymus the Blind, Biblical Scholar; John II, Bishop of Jerusalem; Melania the Younger, Desert Mother; and her husband, Pinian, Monk

9 (Martin Chemnitz, German Lutheran Theologian, and the “Second Martin”)

  • Elijah P. Lovejoy, U.S. Journalist, Abolitionist, Presbyterian Minister, and Martyr, 1837; his brother, Owen Lovejoy, U.S. Abolitionist, Lawmaker, and Congregationalist Minister; and William Wells Brown, African-American Abolitionist, Novelist, Historian, and Physician

  • Johann(es) Matthaus Meyfart, German Lutheran Educator and Devotional Writer

  • Margery Kempe, English Roman Catholic Mystic and Pilgrim

  • William Croswell, Episcopal Priest and Hymn Writer

10 (Leo I “the Great,” Bishop of Rome)

  • Andreas Peter Berggreen, Danish Lutheran Musicologist, Organist, Music Educator, and Composer

  • Lott Cary, African-American Baptist Minister and Missionary to Liberia; and Melville B. Cox, U.S. Methodist Minister and Missionary to Liberia

  • Odette Prévost, French Roman Catholic Nun, and Martyr in Algeria, 1995

11 (Anne Steele, First Important English Female Hymn Writer)

  • Alijca Maria Jadwiga Kotowska, Polish Roman Catholic Nun and Martyr, 1939

  • Edwin Hatch, Anglican Priest, Scholar, and Hymn Writer

  • Martha Coffin Pelham Wright; her sister, Lucretia Coffin Mott; her husband, James Mott; his sister, Abigail Lydia Mott Moore; and her husband, Lindley Murray Moore; U.S. Quaker Abolitionists and Feminists

  • Peter Taylor Forsyth, Scottish Congregationalist Minister and Theologian

12 (Josaphat Kuntsevych, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Polotsk, and Martyr, 1623)

  • John Tavener, English Presbyterian then Orthodox Composer

  • Juana Inés de la Cruz, Mexican Roman Catholic Nun, Composer, Writer, Philosopher, Feminist, and Alleged Heretic

  • Ray Palmer, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

  • William Arthur Dunkerley, British Novelist, Poet, and Hymn Writer

13 (Henry Martyn Dexter, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Historian)

  • Abbo of Fleury, Roman Catholic Abbot

  • Brice of Tours, Roman Catholic Bishop

  • Frances Xavier Cabrini, Foundress of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart

  • William Romanis, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

14 (Samuel Seabury, Episcopal Bishop of Connecticut and Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church)

  • Jane Montgomery Campbell, Anglican Hymn Translator and Music Educator

  • Maria Luiza Merkert, Cofoundress of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth

  • Nicholas Tavelic and His Companions, Roman Catholic Martyrs, 1391

  • Peter Wolle, U.S. Moravian Bishop, Organist, and Composer; Theodore Francis Wolle, U.S. Moravian Organist and Composer; and John Frederick “J. Fred” Wolle, U.S. Moravian Organist, Composer, and Choir Director

15 (John Amos Comenius, Father of Modern Education)

  • Gustaf Aulén and his protégé and colleague, Anders Nygren, Swedish Lutheran Bishops and Theologians

  • Johann Gottlob Klemm, Instrument Maker; David Tannenberg, Sr., German-American Moravian Organ Builder; Johann Philip Bachmann, German-American Moravian Instrument Maker; Joseph Ferdinand Bulitschek, Bohemian-American Organ Builder; and Tobias Friedrich, German Moravian Composer and Musician

  • Johannes Kepler, German Lutheran Astronomer and Mathematician

  • Joseph Pignatelli, Restorer of the Jesuits

16 (Margaret of Scotland, Queen, Humanitarian, and Ecclesiastical Reformer)

  • Giuseppe Moscati, Italian Roman Catholic Physician

  • Ignacio Ellacuria and His Companions, Martyrs in El Salvador, November 15, 1989

  • Jesuit Martyrs of Paraguay, 1628

17 (Arthur Henry Mann, Anglican Organist, Choir Director, Hymnodist, and Hymn Tune Composer)

  • Henriette DeLille, Foundress of the Sisters of the Holy Family

  • Hugh of Lincoln, Roman Catholic Bishop and Abbot

18 (Hilda of Whitby, Roman Catholic Abbess)

  • Arthur Tozer Russell, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

  • Isabel Alice Hartley Crawford, Baptist Missionary to the Kiowa Nation

  • Jane Eliza(beth) Leeson, English Hymn Writer

19 (Elizabeth of Hungary, Princess of Hungary and Humanitarian)

  • Alice Nevin, U.S. German Reformed Liturgist and Composer of Hymn Texts

  • Johann Christian Till, U.S. Moravian Organist, Composer, and Piano Builder; and his son, Jacob Christian Till, U.S. Moravian Piano Builder)

  • Johann Hermann Schein, German Lutheran Composer

  • Samuel John Stone, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

20 (F. Bland Tucker, Episcopal Priest and Hymnodist; “The Dean of American Hymn Writers”)

  • Henry Francis Lyte, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

  • Priscilla Lydia Sellon, a Restorer of Religious Life in The Church of England

  • Richard Watson Gilder, U.S. Poet, Journalist, and Social Reformer

  • Theodore Claudius Pease, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

21 (Thomas Tallis and his student and colleague, William Byrd, English Composers and Organists; and John Merbecke, English Composer, Organist, and Theologian)

  • Guy Ignatius Chabrat, Roman Catholic Bishop Coadjutor of Bardstown then of Louisville, Kentucky; and his cousin, Peter Joseph Lavialle, Roman Catholic Bishop of Louisville, Kentucky

  • Henry Purcell and his brother, Daniel Purcell, English Composers

  • Leo Tolstoy, Russian Orthodox Novelist, Religious Writer, and Philosopher

  • Maria Franciszka Siedliska, Foundress of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth

22 (Robert Seagrave, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer)

  • Anna Kolesárová, Slovak Roman Catholic Martyr, 1944

  • Ditlef Georgson Ristad, Norwegian-American Lutheran Minister, Hymn Translator, Liturgist, and Educator

23 (Clement I, Bishop of Rome)

  • Caspar Friedrich Nachtenhofer, German Lutheran Minister, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer

  • Columban, Roman Catholic Monk, Abbot, and Missionary

  • Enrichetta Alfieri, Italian Roman Catholic Nun and “Angel of San Vittore”

  • John Kenneth Pfohl, Sr., U.S. Moravian Bishop; his wife, Harriet Elizabeth “Bessie” Whittington Pfohl, U.S. Moravian Musician; and their son, James Christian Pfohl, Sr., U.S. Moravian Musician

24 (Andrew Dung-Lac and Peter Thi, Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs in Vietnam, 1839)

  • Lucy Menzies, Scottish Presbyterian then Anglican Scholar and Mystic

  • Theophane Venard, Roman Catholic Priest, Missionary, and Martyr in Vietnam, 1861

  • Vincent Liem, Roman Catholic Martyr, 1773

25 (William Hiley Bathurst, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer)

  • Isaac Watts, English Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

  • James Otis Sargent Huntington, Founder of the Order of the Holy Cross

  • John LaFarge, Jr., U.S. Roman Catholic Priest and Renewer of Society

  • Petrus Nigidius, German Lutheran Educator and Composer; and Georg Nigidius, German Lutheran Composer and Hymn Writer

26 (Siricius, Bishop of Rome)

  • H. Baxter Liebler, Episcopal Priest and Missionary to the Navajo Nation

  • John Berchmans, Roman Catholic Seminarian

  • Sojourner Truth, U.S. Abolitionist, Mystic, and Feminist

  • Theodore P. Ferris, Episcopal Priest and Author

27 (James Intercisus, Roman Catholic Martyr)

  • William Cooke and Benjamin Webb, Anglican Priests and Translators of Hymns

28 (Stephen the Younger, Defender of Icons)

  • Albert George Butzer, Sr., U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Educator

  • Kamehameha IV and Emma Rooke, King and Queen of Hawai’i

  • James Mills Thoburn, Isabella Thoburn, and Clara Swain, U.S. Methodist Missionaries to India

  • Joseph and Michael Hofer, U.S. Hutterite Conscientious Objectors and Martyrs, 1918

29 (Day of Intercession and Thanksgiving for the Missionary Work of the Church)

  • Frederick Cook Atkinson, Anglican Church Organist and Composer

  • Jennette Threlfall, English Hymn Writer

30 (ANDREW THE APOSTLE, MARTYR)

Floating

  • Thanksgiving Day

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.