Archive for the ‘October 9’ Category

Feast of Penny Lernoux (October 9)   Leave a comment

Above:  Latin America

Image in the Public Domain

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

PENNY LERNOUX (JANUARY 6, 1940-OCTOBER 9, 1989)

U.S. Roman Catholic Journalist and Moral Critic

Penny Lernoux–journalist, defender of the poor and oppressed, and advocate for Liberation Theology–comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via two books.  The first one is Robert Ellsberg, All Saints:  Daily Reflections on Saints, Prophets, and Witnesses for Our Time (1997).  The other volume is Jim Wallis and Joyce Hollyday, editors, Cloud of Witnesses, second edition (2005).

Lernoux, born in California on January 6, 1940, was a cradle Roman Catholic.  She became a journalist.  In 1962, as an employee of the United States Information Agency (U.S.I.A.), she traveled to Latin America for the first of many times.  After leaving the U.S.I.A., she went to work for the Copley News Service in the early 1960s.  Our saint, an employee of that news service for about a decade, continued to travel professionally in Latin America.

The Cold War made for nasty bedfellows, all in the name of fighting communism.  The United States Government usually supported Latin American right-wing military dictatorships that sent death squads to execute innocent civilians.  The United States Government even installed some of these dictatorships, all in the name of fighting communism.  These governments were not communist, at least.  Most Roman Catholic bishops in Latin America supported these repressive governments, which were not communist, at least.  Lernoux became disenchanted with her Church and her country in the 1960s.  She remained so for the rest of her life.

Yet our saint found grassroots heroes of faith who renewed her faltering faith.  Maryknoll Sisters helped to renew Lernoux’s faith.  She also met Roman Catholic priests and missioners who worked and identified with the poor and oppressed, despite great risks to themselves.  Lernoux began to tell these stories.  Her first book, Cry of the Poor:  The Struggle for Human Rights in Latin America–The Catholic Church in Conflict with U.S. Policy (1977), was part of that endeavor.  She really lowered the boom on the Vatican and the United States Government in In Banks We Trust:  Bankers and Their Close Associates:  The C.I.A., the Mafia, Drug Traders, Dictators, Politicians, and the Vatican (1984).  She also wrote for The Chronicle of Higher Education and the National Catholic Reporter.  Furthermore, our saint spoke in North American churches, telling the stories of their Latin American counterparts.

Lernoux found another reason to criticize the Vatican.  The Church had betrayed the promise of the Second Vatican Council (Vatican II), she alleged.  For example, Pope John Paul II and Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (later Pope Benedict XVI) were busy silencing dissent in the 1980s.  People of God:  The Struggle for World Catholicism (1989) did nothing to make Lernoux less unpopular at the Vatican.

At the end of her life, Lernoux was writing her fourth book, a history of the Maryknoll Sisters.  In September 1989, Lernoux received her diagnosis of cancer.  On October 8, she aged 49 years old, died in Mount Kisco, New York.  She left behind a husband (Denis Nahum) and a daughter (Angela).  

Robert Ellsberg and Arthur Jones completed Lernoux’s last book.  Hearts on Fire:  The Story of the Maryknoll Sisters debuted in 1993.

Lernoux understood the divine preference for the poor in the Bible.  She, in her words, walked

in solidarity with the poor.

So did many Latin American Roman Catholic priests, lay people, and religious.  So did Brazilian Archbishop Helder Camara (1909-1989), who challenged his fellow Latin American bishops to identify with the poor and the oppressed, not the rich and the powerful.  And so did El Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero (1917-1980), who became a martyr.

The poor and the oppressed need more advocates of the calibre of Penny Lernoux.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

God of the poor and oppressed,

thank you for the work and legacy of your servant Penny Lernoux,

a journalist, an advocate for the poor and oppressed, and a faithful dissident.

Help us, we pray, shake off the barriers to recognizing oppression and exploitation,

and our roles in perpetuating those sins.

May we, in the name of performing righteousness,

not commit and perpetuate evil.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) 4:1-10

Psalm 15

Revelation 18:1-24

Luke 6:20-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 29, 2021 COMMON ERA

MONDAY IN HOLY WEEK

THE FEAST OF CHARLES VILLIERS STANFORD, COMPOSER, ORGANIST, AND CONDUCTOR

THE FEAST OF DORA GREENWELL, POET AND DEVOTIONAL WRITER

THE FEAST OF ELIZABETH RUNDLE CHARLES, ANGLICAN WRITER, HYMN TRANSLATOR, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF JOHN KEBLE, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND POET

THE FEAST OF SAINTS JONAS AND BARACHISIUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYRS, 327

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of Robert Grosseteste (October 9)   1 comment

Above:  Robert Grosseteste 

Image in the Public Domain

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

ROBERT GROSSETESTE (CIRCA 1168-OCTOBER 9, 1253)

English Roman Catholic Scholar, Philosopher, and Bishop of Lincoln

This project, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, is an exercise in the Great Man (and Woman) School of History.  I make no apology for this.  Social History and Cultural History have their vital roles to fill in historical analysis, but I remain a devotee of the emphasis on the great people–those who have made their marks on the world.

Grosseteste, born circa 1168, was a Christian intellectual and a bishop.  He, educated at Oxford and perhaps at Paris, also, taught at Oxford prior to 1209.  Our saint, a priest, held various ecclesiastical position through 1232.  He resigned all but one–Prebendary of Lincoln–that year.  The former Chancellor of Oxford University (circa 1215-1221) taught at the Franciscan house of studies, Oxford, from 1224 to 1235.  Then he became the Bishop of Lincoln.

Grosseteste had a fine mind.  He, an Aristotelian with Neoplatonist influences, translated works of Aristotle and some ancient saints, wrote commentaries on the Bible and works of Aristotle.  Our saint, whose life ended as the worst outbreak of the Black Death was ending and the Renaissance was about to begin, was an active encourager of the spread of knowledge–philosophy, science, mathematics, and the Bible.  He accepted truth, as he recognized it, regardless of its source or manner of transmission.

Grosseteste, author of theological and devotional works, was a pious bishop who took his spiritual responsibilities seriously.  He was a man of his time, for he affirmed the supremacy of the Church over the state.  This opinion caused some political problems for him.  Grosseteste also had political conflicts with various bishops and at least one Pope; our saint was an uncompromising critic and opponent of ecclesiastical corruption.

Grosseteste died in Buckdon, Buckinghamshire, England, on October 9, 1253.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

OCTOBER 9, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT DENIS, BISHOP OF PARIS, AND HIS COMPANIONS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYRS

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN LEONARDI, FOUNDER OF THE CLERKS REGULAR OF THE MOTHER OF GOD OF LUCCA; AND SAINT JOSEPH CALASANCTIUS, FOUNDER OF THE CLERKS REGULAR OF RELIGIOUS SCHOOLS

THE FEAST OF ROBERT GROSSETESTE, ENGLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC SCHOLAR, PHILOSOPHER, AND BISHOP OF LINCOLN

THE FEAST OF WILFRED THOMASON GRENFELL, MEDICAL MISSIONARY TO NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Robert Grosseteste and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of Wilfred Thomason Grenfell (October 9)   Leave a comment

03438v

Above:  Sir Wilfred Grenfell and Elizabeth Caldwell MacClanahan Grenfell, 1914

Photograph Created by Harris & Ewing

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-hec-03438

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

SIR WILDRED THOMASON GRENFELL (FEBRUARY 28, 1865-OCTOBER 9, 1940)

Medical Missionary to Newfoundland and Labrador

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The purpose of this world is not to have and hold, but to serve.

–Sir Wilfred Thomason Grenfell

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

One day a few years ago I listened via my computer to a midday call-in program from the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador.  The topic that day was remote Labrador town which previously had had access to the outside world only via ferry service.    Yet recently the provincial government had built a gravel road to that town.  So residents called in the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) program and commented on how nice it was to have the road and how odd it was to see license (in Canada, licence) plates from other parts of the country.  That hour taught me how remote some parts of Labrador are.

NFL_in_1912

Above:  Map of Newfoundland (and Labrador), 1912

(Image in the public domain)

Wilfred Thomason Grenfell (1865-1940), born in Cheshire, England, was the son of The Reverend Algernon Sidney Grenfell, an Anglican priest and the Headmaster of Mostyn House School, Parkgate, and Jane Georgina Hutchinson Grenfell.  Our saint studied medicine at the London Hospital Medical School.  While in London he came under the influence of evangelist Dwight L. Moody.  In 1889, Grenfell, already licensed to practice medicine, joined the Royal National Mission to Deep-Sea Fishermen, which took him to the Bay of Biscay and to Iceland.

In 1892 the Royal National Mission took our saint to his life’s great work.  A trip to Labrador revealed the poverty, bad health, and near starvation of British workers there to Grenfell.  The following year he founded he Labrador Medical Mission, which grew in time to operate a host of benevolent institutions, such as hospitals, hospital ships, boarding schools, and clothing distribution centers.  The Mission there who needed what it offered.  Grenfell traveled, spoke, and wrote to raise funds to support his good works.  Among his books were the following:

In 1909 Grenfell married Elizabeth Caldwell MacClanahan (1885-1938), a Chicago heiress who became involved in the medical mission.  He organized the International Grenfell Association, with branches in Newfoundland (not a part of Canada until 1949), Canada, and the United States, in 1912.  During World War I our saint served in a surgical unit in France.  Decades of dedication to saving human lives did compromise his own health, so Grenfell retired to Vermont in 1935.  There he died in 1940, twelve years after King George V had knighted him.

The name of Sir Wilfred Thomason Grenfell deserves more attention than it receives.  That name lives on in the Grenfell Regional Health Services Board (founded in 1981), which has taken over the former duties of the International Grenfell Association.  Grenfell Historical Properties (http://www.grenfell-properties.com/) would like for Grenfell to be more famous.  And The Episcopal Church has honored him by adding him to its calendar of saints, with a feast day of October 9.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 24, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE NATIVITY OF SAINT JOHN THE BAPTIST

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Compassionate God, whose Son Jesus Christ taught that by ministering

to the least of our brothers and sisters, we minister to him:

Make us ever ready to respond to the needs of others,

that inspired by the ministry of Wilfred Grenfell

to the sick and to seafarers in Labrador and northern Newfoundland,

our actions may witness to the love of our Savior Jesus Christ;

who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

2 Kings 2:19-22

Psalm 107:23- 32

1 Corinthians 12:1-11

Mark 6:45-56

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 631

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of Sts. John Leonardi and Joseph Calasanctius (October 9)   2 comments

Above:  The Vatican Flag

SAINT JOHN LEONARDI (CIRCA 1550-1609)

Founder of the Clerks Regular of the Mother of God of Lucca

His feast = October 9

++++++++

SAINT JOSEPH CALASANCTIUS (1556-1648)

also known as Saint Joseph Calasanz

Founder of the Clerks Regular of Religious Schools

His feast transferred from August 25

I, when pondering demonstrated sanctity, find certain aspects appealing.  One of these is educating those who, due to financial constraints, would otherwise lack access to learning.  Another is tending to the needs of plague victims.  Both of these apply in this post.

St. John Leonardi (circa 1550-1609) entered the world at Diecimo, Italy.  He, originally a pharmacist’s assistant, became a priest in 1572.  The saint worked in hospitals and prisons, but did not labor alone; he recruited others to join him.  Leonardi, inspired by the Council of Trent, proposed a new order, the Clerks Regular of the Mother of God of Lucca, which the Roman Catholic Church recognized in 1583.  St. Philip Neri and St. Joseph Calasanctius assisted him regarding the new order.  Pope Clement VIII confirmed the order in 1595.

Leonardi, cofounder of the College for the Propagation of the Faith, died at Rome on October 9, 1609.  He had contracted a deadly case of influenza during an epidemic while ministering to victims.  His active compassion led to his death.  Pope Pius XI canonized the saint, patron of pharmacists, in 1938.

St. Joseph Calasanctius (1556-1648), a collaborator of St. John Leonardi, entered the world near Peralta de la Sal, Aragon, Spain, on September 11, 1556.  His father wanted him to become a soldier, but Calasanctius earned his law degree and became a priest instead.  The Bishop of Urgel appointed him to revive and reform religious practices in that part of the Pyrenees Mountains.  The saint, successful, next became vicar general of the district of Tremp.  He resigned in 1592 and traveled to Rome, becoming part of the household of Ascanio Cardinal Colonna.

At Rome the saint’s true calling became his lived reality.  There, in 1595, he ministered among plague victims.  There he became involved in the cause of educating poor children, opening the first free school in in modern Europe (in 1597).  At Rome Calasanctius supervised a community, the Clerks Regular of Religious Schools, devoted to this work.  The Roman Catholic Church recognized the order in 1621. The saint, the order’s first superior general, had to leave that post due to internal dissension.  Later, however, he returned to the job.

In 1646 Pope Innocent X transformed the order into a community of secular priests subject to diocesan bishops.  Nevertheless, the Church restored the religious order in 1669.

I was happy to read that Calasanctius defended his good friend, Galileo Galilei.  The saint even used his order’s resources to aid the alleged heretic, officially one until 1992.  Such assistance proved controversial, and the saint paid the price for doing the right thing.

Calasanctius died at Rome on August 25, 1648.  The Church canonized him in 1767.

A misinformed understanding of suffering holds that the righteous prosper and the wicked suffer.  This is a perspective which the Book of Job refutes.  This is a point of view which the examples of Jesus, the persecuted saints, and some Hebrew prophets refute.   This is a perspective which the examples of these two saints refute.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 24, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ANNA E. B. ALEXANDER, EPISCOPAL DEACONESS

THE FEAST OF CHRISTIAN X OF DENMARK AND HAAKON VII OF NORWAY, BROTHERS AND KINGS

THE FEAST OF PAULINE SPERRY, POLITICAL ACTIVIST

THE FEAST OF ROBERT MCAFEE BROWN, ECUMENIST

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served.

Lead us by his love to serve all those whom the world offers no comfort and little hope.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the  weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

Feast of St. Denis and His Companions (October 9)   3 comments

Above:  The Nave of the Basilica of St. Denis, Paris, France

SAINT DENIS (DIED CIRCA 250)

First Bishop of Paris, and Martyr

Also known as Denys, Dennis, and Dionysius

Many legends have grown from the life of St. Denis, who, along with Deacon Eleutherius and Father Rusticus, undertook a perilous mission to the persecuted Church in Gaul, now France.  They worked at Paris, where they founded a Christian community and converted many pagans before pressure from pagan priests culminated in the imprisonment, torture, and execution of St. Denis and his companions.  Legends include the tale that the deceased St. Denis picked up his severed head, held it, walked two miles to his burial site, and delivered a sermon along the way.  Ironically, Catholic hagiographers have long encouraged the faithful to invoke the headless Patron Saint of France against headaches.

Such a tale, just one part of a contradictory corpus of lore, is needless and obviously fictitious.  Denis, Eleutherius, and Rusticus gave their lives for Jesus, the crucified and resurrected one.  Each received the crown of martyrdom after taking up his cross and following his Lord.  What more need one say to justify sainthood in these cases?

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 16, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT LUDMILLA, DUCHESS OF BOHEMIA

THE FEAST OF SAINT NINIAN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF GALLOWAY

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Common of a Martyr II

From Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), of The Episcopal Church

Almighty God, by whose grace and power your holy martyrs Denis, Eleutherius, and Rusticus triumphed over suffering and were faithful even to death:  Grant us, who now remember them in thanksgiving, to be so faithful in our witness to you in this world, that we may receive with them the crown of life; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.   Amen.

Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) 51:1-12

Psalm116 or 116:1-8

Revelation 7:13-17

Luke 12:2-12

Posted September 16, 2011 by neatnik2009 in October 9, Saints of 200-249, Saints of 250-299

Tagged with

Saints’ Days and Holy Days for October   1 comment

Calendula

Image Source = Alvesgaspar

1 (Anthony Ashley Cooper, Lord Shaftesbury, British Humanitarian and Social Reformer)

  • Marie-Joseph Aubert, Foundress of the Daughters of Our Lady of Compassion

  • Ralph W. Sockman, United Methodist Minister

  • Romanus the Melodist, Deacon and Hymnodist

  • Thérèse of Lisieux, Roman Catholic Nun and Mystic

2 (Petrus Herbert, German Moravian Bishop and Hymnodist)

  • Carl Doving, Norwegian-American Lutheran Minister and Hymn Translator

  • Chuck Matthei, Founder and Director of the Equity Trust, Inc.

  • James Allen, English Inghamite then Glasite/Sandemanian Hymn Writer; and his great-nephew, Oswald Allen, English Glasite/Sandemanian Hymn Writer

  • Maria Anna Kratochwil, Polish Roman Catholic Nun and Martyr, 1942

3 (George Kennedy Allen Bell, Anglican Bishop of Chichester)

  • Alberto Ramento, Prime Bishop of the Philippine Independent Church

  • Gerard of Brogne, Roman Catholic Abbot

  • John Raleigh Mott, U.S. Methodist Lay Evangelist, and Ecumenical Pioneer

  • William Scarlett, Episcopal Bishop of Missouri, and Advocate for Social Justice

4 (Francis of Assisi, Founder of the Order of Friars Minor)

  • Agneta Chang, Maryknoll Sister and Martyr in Korea, 1950

  • Ernest William Olson, Swedish-American Lutheran Poet, Editor, Hymn Translator, and Hymn Writer

  • H. H. Rowley, English Baptist Minister and Biblical Scholar

  • John Clarke, English Baptist Minister and Champion of Religious Liberty in New England

5 (David Nitschmann, Sr., “Father Nitschmann,” Moravian Missionary; Melchior Nitschmann, Moravian Missionary and Martyr; Johann Nitschmann, Jr., Moravian Missionary and Bishop; Anna Nitschman, Moravian Eldress; and David Nitschmann, Missionary and First Bishop of the Renewed Moravian Church)

  • Cyriacus Schneegass, German Lutheran Minister, Musician, and Hymn Writer

  • Francis Xavier Seelos, German-American Roman Catholic Priest

  • Harry Emerson Fosdick, U.S. Northern Baptist Minister and Opponent of Fundamentalism

  • Joseph Lowery, African-American United Methodist Minister and Civil Rights Leader; “The Dean of the Civil Rights Movement”

6 (George Edward Lynch Cotton, Anglican Bishop of Calcutta)

  • Heinrich Albert, German Lutheran Composer and Poet

  • Herbert G. May, U.S. Biblical Scholar and Translator

  • John Ernest Bode, Anglican Priest, Poet, and Hymn Writer

  • William Tyndale, English Reformer, Bible Translator, and Martyr; and Miles Coverdale, English Reformer, Bible Translator, and Bishop of Exeter

7 (Wilhelm Wexels, Norwegian Lutheran Minister, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator; his niece, Marie Wexelsen, Norwegian Lutheran Novelist and Hymn Writer; Ludwig Lindeman, Norwegian Lutheran Organist and Musicologist; and Magnus Landstad, Norwegian Lutheran Minister, Folklorist, Hymn Writer, and Hymnal Editor)

  • Bradford Torrey, U.S. Ornithologist and Hymn Writer

  • Claus Westermann, German Lutheran Minister and Biblical Translator

  • Johann Gottfried Weber, German Moravian Musician, Composer, and Minister

  • John Woolman, Quaker Abolitionist

8 (Erik Routley, English Congregationalist Hymnodist)

  • Abraham Ritter, U.S. Moravian Merchant, Historian, Musician, and Composer

  • Alexander Penrose Forbes, Scottish Episcopal Bishop of Brechin; Church Historian; and Renewer of the Scottish Episcopal Church

  • Richard Whately, Anglican Archbishop of Dublin, Ireland

  • William Dwight Porter Bliss, Episcopal Priest; and Richard Theodore Ely, Economists

9 (Denis, Bishop of Paris, and His Companions, Roman Catholic Martyrs)

  • John Leonardi, Founder of the Clerks Regular of the Mother of God of Lucca; and Joseph Calasanctius, Founder of the Clerks Regular of Religious Schools

  • Penny Lernoux, U.S. Roman Catholic Journalist and Moral Critic

  • Robert Grosseteste, English Roman Catholic Scholar, Philosopher, and Bishop of Lincoln

  • Wilfred Thomason Grenfell, Medical Missionary to Newfoundland and Labrador

10 (Johann Nitschmann, Sr., Moravian Missionary and Bishop; David Nitschmann, Jr., the Syndic, Moravian Missionary and Bishop; and David Nitschmann, the Martyr, Moravian Missionary and Martyr)

  • Christian Ludwig Brau, Norwegian Moravian Teacher and Poet

  • Edward White Benson, Archbishop of Canterbury

  • Louis FitzGerald Benson, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymnodist

  • Vida Dutton Scudder, Episcopal Professor, Author, Christian Socialist, and Social Reformer

11 (PHILIP THE EVANGELIST, DEACON)

12 (Martin Dober, Moravian Bishop and Hymn Writer; Johann Leonhard Dober, Moravian Missionary and Bishop; and Anna Schindler Dober, Moravian Missionary and Hymn Writer)

  • Cecil Frances Alexander, Irish Anglican Hymn Writer

  • Edith Cavell, English Nurse and Martyr, 1915

  • Elizabeth Fry, English Quaker Social Reformer and “Angel of the Prisons”

  • Nectarius of Constantinople, Archbishop

13 (Christian David, Moravian Missionary)

  • Alban Butler, English Roman Catholic Priest and Hagiographer

  • Henry Stephen Cutler, Episcopal Organist, Choirmaster, and Composer

  • João Bosco Burnier, Brazilian Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1976

  • Vincent Taylor, British Methodist Minister and Biblical Scholar

14 (Callixtus I, Anterus, and Pontian, Bishops of Rome; and Hippolytus, Antipope)

  • Jean-Baptiste Lamy, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Santa Fe, New Mexico

  • Roman Lysko, Ukrainian Greek Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1949

  • Samuel Isaac Joseph Schereschewsky, Episcopal Bishop of Shanghai, and Biblical Translator

  • Thomas Hansen Kingo, Danish Lutheran Bishop, Hymn Writer, and “Poet of Eastertide”

15 (Teresa of Avila, Spanish Roman Catholic Nun, Mystic, and Reformer)

  • Gabriel Richards, French-American Roman Catholic Missionary Priest in Detroit, Michigan
  • Obadiah Holmes, English Baptist Minister and Champion of Religious Liberty in New England

16 (Albert E. R. Brauer, Australian Lutheran Minister and Hymn Translator)

  • Augustine Thevarparampil, Indian Roman Catholic Priest and “Good Shepherd of the Dalits”

  • Gaspar Contarini, Italian Roman Catholic Cardinal and Agent of Reconciliation

  • Hedwig of Andechs, Roman Catholic Princess and Nun; and her daughter, Gertrude of Trzebnica, Roman Catholic Abbess

  • Józef Jankowski, Polish Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1941

17 (Charles Gounod, French Roman Catholic Composer)

  • Birgitte Katerine Boye, Danish Lutheran Poet, Playwright, Hymn Translator, and Hymn Writer

  • John Bowring, English Unitarian Hymn Writer, Social Reformer, and Philanthropist

  • Richard McSorley, U.S. Roman Catholic Priest, Professor, and Peace Activist

18 (LUKE THE EVANGELIST, PHYSICIAN)

19 (Martyrs of North America, 1642-1649)

  • Claudia Frances Ibotson Hernaman, Anglican Hymn Writer and Translator

  • Jerzy Popieluszko, Polish Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1984

  • Paul of the Cross, Founder of the Congregation of Discaled Clerks of the Most Holy Cross and Passion

20 (Philip Schaff and John Williamson Nevin, U.S. German Reformed Historians, Theologians, and Liturgists)

  • Friedrich Funcke, German Lutheran Minister, Composer, and Hymn Writer

  • James W. C. Pennington, African-American Congregationalist and Presbyterian Minister, Educator, and Abolitionist

  • John Harris Burt, Episcopal Bishop of Ohio, and Civil Rights Activist

  • Mary A. Lathbury, U.S. Methodist Hymn Writer

21 (George McGovern, U.S. Senator and Stateman; and his wife, Eleanor McGovern, Humanitarian)

  • David Moritz Michael, German-American Moravian Musician and Composer

  • Emily Gardiner Neal, Episcopal Deacon, Religious Writer, and Leader of the Healing Movement in The Episcopal Church

  • Laura of Saint Catherine of Siena, Foundress of the Works of the Indians and the Congregation of Missionary Sisters of Immaculate Mary and of Saint Catherine of Siena

  • Walter and Albertina Sisulu, Anti-Apartheid Activists and Political Prisoners in South Africa

22 (Paul Tillich, German-American Lutheran Theologian)

  • Emily Huntington Miller, U.S. Methodist Author and Hymn Writer

  • Frederick Pratt Green, British Methodist Minister, Poet, and Hymn Writer

  • Katharina von Schlegal, German Lutheran Hymn Writer

  • Martyrs of Heraclea, 304

23 (JAMES OF JERUSALEM, BROTHER OF JESUS)

24 (Rosa Parks, African-American Civil Rights Activist)

  • Fritz Eichenberg, German-American Quaker Wood Engraver

  • Henry Clay Shuttleworth, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

  • Pavel Chesnokov, Russian Orthodox Composer

  • Proclus, Archbishop of Constantinople; and Rusticus, Bishop of Narbonne

25 (Johann Daniel Grimm, German Moravian Musician)

  • Eric Norelius, Swedish-American Lutheran Minister

26 (Alfred the Great, King of the West Saxons)

  • Arthur Campbell Ainger, English Educator, Scholar, and Hymn Writer

  • Francis Pott, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer and Translator

  • Henry Stanley Oakeley, Composer

  • Philip Nicolai, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer

27 (James A. Walsh and Thomas Price, Cofounders of the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers; and Mary Josephine Rogers, Foundress of the Maryknoll Sisters of Saint Dominic)

  • Aedesius, Priest and Missionary; and Frumentius, First Bishop of Axum and Abuna of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church

  • Dmitry Bortniansky, Russian Orthodox Composer

  • Harry Webb Farrington, U.S. Methodist Minister and Hymn Writer

  • Levi and Catherine Coffin, U.S. Quaker Abolitionists and Conductors of the Underground Railroad

28 (SIMON AND JUDE, APOSTLES AND MARTYRS)

29 (Martyrs of Lien-Chou, China, October 28, 1905)

  • Bartholomaus Helder, German Lutheran Minister, Composer, and Hymn Writer

  • James Hannington, Anglican Bishop of Eastern Equatorial Guinea; and His Companions, Martyrs

  • Joseph Grigg, English Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

  • Paul Manz, Dean of Lutheran Church Music

30 (Hugh O’Flaherty, “Scarlet Pimperel of the Vatican”)

  • Elizabeth Comstock, Anglo-American Quaker Educator, Abolitionist, and Social Reformer

  • Marcellus the Centurion and Cassian of Tangiers, Roman Catholic Martyrs, 298

  • Oleksa Zarytsky, Ukrainian Greek Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1963

  • Walter John Mathams, British Baptist then Presbyterian Minister, Author, and Hymn Writer

31 (Reformation Day)

  • Daniel C. Roberts, Episcopal Priest and Hymn Writer

  • Gerhard Von Rad and Martin Noth, German Lutheran Biblical Scholars

  • Ivan Kochurov, Russian Orthodox Priest and Martyr, 1917

  • Paul Shinji Sasaki, Anglican Bishop of Mid-Japan, Bishop of Tokyo, and Primate of Nippon Sei Ko Kei; and Philip Lendel Tsen, Anglican Bishop of Honan and Presiding Bishop of Chung Hua Sheng Kung Hui

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.