Archive for the ‘Saints of 1850-1859’ Category

Feast of Guy Ignatius Chabrat and Pierre Joseph Lavialle (November 21)   1 comment

Above:  The Old Seal of the Commonwealth of Kentucky

Image in the Public Domain

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GUY IGNATIUS CHABRAT (DECEMBER 27, 1787-NOVEMBER 21, 1868)

Roman Catholic Bishop Coadjutor of Bardstown then of Louisville, Kentucky

cousin of

PIERRE JOSEPH LAVIALLE (JULY 15, 1820-MAY 11, 1867)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Louisville, Kentucky

Also known as Peter Joseph Lavialle

Bishop Guy Ignatius Chabrat comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via Bishop Benedict Joseph Flaget (1763-1850)Bishop Pierre (Peter) Joseph Lavialle comes here via his cousin, Bishop Chabrat.

Guy Ignatius Chabrat was French.  He, born in La Chambre, Savoie, on December 28, 1787, was a son of Pierre Chabrat and Louise (Lavialle) Chabrat.  Our saint matriculated at the Sulpician seminary in Clermont.  Ordained a subdeacon in 1809, Chabrat accepted the newly-appointed Bishop Flaget‘s invitation to come to the new Diocese of Bardstown, Kentucky.  Chabrat sailed with Flaget in 1810 and arrived with him in Bardstown on June 9, 1811.  Flaget ordained him a priest on Christmas Day, 11, making Chabrat the first Roman Catholic priest ordained west of the Allegheny Mountains.

Chabrat ministered in Kentucky.  He served at, in order:

  1. St. Michael’s Church, Fairfield;
  2. St. Clare’s Church, Colesburg; and
  3. St. Pius Church, Georgetown.

In 1824, Father Charles Nerinckx (b. 1761), founder of the Sisters of Loretto, a teaching order, died.  Chabrat succeeded him as the superior of that order.

Pope Gregory XVI appointed Chabrat the Bishop Coadjutor of Bardstown and the Titular Bishop of Bolina on March 21, 1834.  Consecrated on July 20, our saint served for more than a decade.  He functioned as the chief administrator in lieu of the aged Flaget.  The Diocese of Bardstown became the Diocese of Louisville in 1837, so Chabrat became the Bishop Coadjutor of Louisville.

In 1842, Chabrat invited his maternal cousin, Pierre (Peter) Joseph Lavialle, to join the Diocese of Louisville.  Lavialle, born in Mauriac, Cantal, on July 15, 1820, was a Sulpician seminarian in 1842.  He completed his theological education at St. Thomas Seminary, Bardstown, Kentucky.  Lavialle, ordained to the priesthood on February 2, 1844, served as the Curate of the Cathedral of the Assumption, Louisville, until 1849.

Meanwhile, Chabrat’s eyesight was failing.  He resigned in 1847, returned to France, and lived on a generous pension.

Above:  The Basilica of St. Joseph and the Former St. Thomas Seminary, Bardstown, Kentucky

Image Source = Google Earth

Lavialle remained in the United States of America.  He taught theology at St. Thomas Seminary, Bardstown (next to the Basilica of St. Joseph) from 1849 to 1856,  Then our saint was the President of St. Mary’s College, St. Mary, Kentucky (1856f).  He refused an appointment as Archbishop of New Orleans in 1860.

Above:  The Cathedral of the Assumption, Louisville, Kentucky (Completed in 1852)

Image Source = Google Earth

However, on September 24, 1865, Lavialle received consecration as the Bishop of Louisville.  He succeeded Martin John Spalding (1810-1872), who had transferred to become the Archbishop of Baltimore (1864-1872).  Lavialle’s tenure as the Bishop of Louisville was brief yet fruitful.  He did much to build up the diocese before he, aged 46 years, died on May 11, 1867,

Chabrat, aged 80 years, died in Mauriac, Cantal, France, on November 21, 1868.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 29, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CATHERINE OF SIENA, ROMAN CATHOLIC MYSTIC AND RELIGIOUS

THE FEAST OF SAINTS BOSA OF YORK, JOHN OF BEVERLEY, WILFRID THE YOUNGER, AND ACCA OF HEXHAM, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS

THE FEAST OF JAMES EDWARD WALSH, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY BISHOP AND POLITICAL PRISONER IN CHINA

THE FEAST OF SIMON B. PARKER, UNITED METHODIST BIBLICAL SCHOLAR

THE FEAST OF TIMOTHY REES, WELSH ANGLICAN HYMN WRITER AND BISHOP OF LLANDAFF

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Almighty God, you have raised up faithful bishops and leaders of your Church.

May the memory of their lives be a source of joy for us and a bulwark of our faith,

so that we may serve you and confess your name before the world;

through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3:14-21

John 21:15-17 or Matthew 24:42-47

Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 38

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Feast of Benedict Joseph Flaget (November 7)   4 comments

Above:  Benedict Joseph Flaget

Image in the Public Domain

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BENEDICT JOSEPH FLAGET (NOVEMBER 7, 1763-FEBRUARY 11, 1850)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Bardstown then of Louisville, Kentucky

Bishop Benedict Joseph Flaget comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Flaget was French.  He, born at Contournat, near Billom, Auvergne, on November 7, 1763, became an orphan when two years old.  Our saint and his two brothers grew up in the household of an uncle (Canon Benoît Flaget) and an aunt at Billom.  At the age of seventeen years, our saint matriculated at the Sulpician seminary in Clermont.

Flaget became a priest.  He, ordained on All Saints’ Day, 1783, at Issy, taught for years.  Our saint taught theology at Nantes for two years then did the same at Angers.  The anti-clericalism of the French Revolution led to the closing of the seminary at Angers.  Flaget, after returning briefly to Billom in 1791, sailed for the United States of America in January 1792.  He sailed with Étienne (Stephen) Theodore Badin (1768-1853), then a subdeacon, but destined to become the first Roman Catholic priest ordained in the United States of America, on May 25, 1793.  Flaget also sailed with Jean-Baptiste-Marie (John Baptist Mary) David (1761-1841), whom he had recruited to the seminary.

The three future missionaries landed in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 29, 1792.  They proceeded to study English and prepare for their tasks in the New World.  John Carroll (1735-1815), the Bishop of Baltimore (1789-1808) then the Archbishop of Baltimore (1808-1815), assigned Flaget to minister to indigenous people at Fort Vincennes, Northwest Territory (now Indiana).  Our saint arrived on December 21, 1792.  Recalled after two years, he taught at Georgetown College (now University) until 1798.  Then, transferred to Havana, Cuba, in 1798, Flaget eventually returned to Baltimore, in the company of twenty-three students.

Pope Pius VII created the Diocese of Bardstown, Kentucky (out of the Archdiocese of Baltimore), and appointed Flaget the first bishop thereof on April 8, 1808.  Flaget, back in France, initially refused.  Yet he accepted the appointment.  Our saint returned to the United States of America in 1810.  He sailed with friend and colleague Father Simon William Bruté (1779-1839), later the first Bishop of Vincennes.  Another passenger on that vessel was Subdeacon Guy Ignatius Chabrat (1787-1868).  Flaget, consecrated by Archbishop John Carroll in Baltimore on November 4, 1810, arrived in Bardstown on June 9, 1811.

The Diocese of Bardstown was initially vast.  However, as time passed, the Church carved other dioceses out of it.  In 1811, the Diocese of Bardstown included the original Northwest Territory (1787), Kentucky, and Tennessee.  The new diocese was a daunting mission field.  In 1811, after a long and difficult overland journey, Flaget and his entourage arrived in Bardstown.  Shortly after arriving, the new bishop wrote in his journal:

In entering the town, I devoted myself to to all the guardian angels who reside therein, and I prayed to God, with all my heart, to make me an instrument of His glory in this new Diocese.  O my dear brother, have compassion on me, overloaded with so heavy a burden, and pray fervently to God that he would vouchsafe to lighten it.

–Quoted in Cady and Webber. A Year with American Saints (2006), 574

Above:  The Basilica of St. Joseph, Bardstown, Kentucky

Image Source = Google Earth

Flaget was an effective and energetic missionary bishop.  He founded a seminary and parishes.  Construction of his first cathedral, the Basilica of St. Joseph, Bardstown, finished in 1823.  Chabrat became one of Flaget’s missionary priests.  Flaget ordained him, the first Roman Catholic priest ordained west of the Allegheny Mountains, on Christmas Day, 1811.  Flaget also helped to select most of the Roman Catholic bishops consecrated in the United States of America in the 1810-1830s.  John Baptist Mary David (1761-1841), the Bishop Coadjutor of Bardstown (1819-1832), succeeded as the Bishop of Bardstown when Flaget retired, in 1832.  Our saint’s age and health were catching up with him.

David served as the Bishop of Bardstown for less than a year (1832-1833).  Whatever and however great his virtues were, the majority of priests and lay people wanted Flaget back.  Therefore, David resigned and Flaget returned.  Our saint’s second tenure lasted from 1833 to 1850.  His next Bishop Coadjutor was Chabrat, consecrated on July 20, 1834.  By then, the diocese spanned only Kentucky and Tennessee.  Flaget and Chabrat continued to found institutions, build up the diocese, and lay the foundations for future dioceses.  And Flaget traveled in France and Italy (1835-1839).  In his absence, the Diocese of Bardstown became the Diocese of Louisville in 1837.  Chabrat, who had taken over most of the administrative work of the diocese, was going blind.  Therefore, he resigned in 1847 and returned to France.  Flaget needed a new Bishop Coadjutor.

Flaget’s third Bishop Coadjutor was Martin John Spalding, a priest in the diocese.  Spalding was a fine choice, for he was already one of the main administrators of the Diocese of Louisville.  Spalding was the effectively the Bishop of Louisville, starting in 1848, for the aged Flaget all-but officially retired while retaining the title “Bishop of Louisville.”

Flaget, aged 86 years, died in Louisville, Kentucky, on February 11, 1850.

His tomb is in the basement of the Cathedral of the Assumption, Louisville.

Spalding served (officially) as the Bishop of Louisville from 1850 to 1864.  He, appointed the Archbishop of Baltimore (1864-1872), was an uncle of John Lancaster Spalding (1840-1816), the Bishop of Peoria (1877-1908).

Flaget, by the grace of God, functioned as an instrument of divine glory.

May you, O reader, do the same in your context.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 28, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JAROSLAV VAJDA, U.S. LUTHERAN MINISTER, HYMN TRANSLATOR, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOZEF CEBULA, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR, 1941

THE FEAST OF SAINT PAMPHILIUS OF SULMONA, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF ALMSGIVER

THE FEAST OF SAINT PETER CHANEL, PROTOMARTYR OF OCEANIA, 1841

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM STRINGFELLOW, EPISCOPAL ATTORNEY, THEOLOGIAN, AND SOCIAL ACTIVIST

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Almighty God, whose will it is to be glorified in your saints,

and who raised up your servant Benedict Joseph Flaget to be a light in the world:

Shine, we pray, in our hearts, that we also in our generation may show forth your praise,

who called us out of darkness into your marvelous light;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with

you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Isaiah 49:1-6

Psalm 98 or 98:1-4

Acts 17:22-31

Matthew 28:16-20

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 717

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Feast of Andreas Peter Berggreen (November 10)   Leave a comment

Above:  Andreas Peter Berggreen

Image in the Public Domain

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ANDREAS PETER BERGGREEN (MARCH 2, 1801-NOVEMBER 9, 1880)

Danish Lutheran Musicologist, Organist, Music Educator, and Composer

Also known as Andreas Peter Berggren and Anton Peter Berggreen

Andreas Peter Berggreen comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).  That source lists his name as Anton Peter Berggreen.  This post relies primarily on various hymnal companion volumes.

Berggreen, born in Copenhagen, Denmark, on March 2, 1801, had a predicament familiar to many people.  His parents wanted him to become an attorney, but he did not.  No, our saint’s passion was for music.  Berggreen’s parents forced him to study law at the University of Copenhagen, but he studied music, too.  His teachers of music included composer Christoph Ernest Friedrich (C.E.F.) Weyse (1774-1842).  Berggreen, once free to decide what to do, pursued a career in music, not law.

Above:  Trinitatis Church, Copenhagen, Denmark

Image Source = Google Earth

Berggreen composed songs, operas, cantatas, and incidental music in the 1820s and 1830s.  Most of those compositions have fallen into obscurity.  He had more success as a musicologist and a music educator.  Fourteen volumes (1834-1876) of songs for use in schools, as well as Folksange og Melodier (1842-1871)–all eleven volumes of it–contributed to Berggreen’s fame.  And the Danish Lutheran Church’s Melodier til Salmebog (1853) contained some of our saint’s hymn tunes.  Berggeen, the organist at Trinitatis Church, Copenhagen (1838-1880), started teaching at the Metropolitan School, Copenhagen, in 1843.  To thoe duties he added those of the Song Inspector (Superintendent) for public schools in Copenhagen in 1859.  Furthermore, Berggreen organized the musical associations for members of the working class.  And he taught composer Niels Gade (1817-1890).

The hymn tunes Berggreen composed included:

  1. ALDRIG ER JEG UDEN VAADE;
  2. AMEN, JESUS HAN SKAL RAADE;
  3. AMEN, SJUNGE HVARJE TUNGA (a.k.a. DANA);
  4. BERGGREEN;
  5. MILLARD;
  6. SALVATOR;
  7. UNDERBAR EN SJÄRNA BLID; and
  8. VITA.

Berggreen, aged 79 years, died in Copenhagen on November 9, 1880.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 27, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF GEORGE WASHINGTON DOANE, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF NEW JERSEY; AND HIS SON, WILLIAM CROSWELL DOANE, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF ALBANY; HYMN WRITERS

THE FEAST OF SAINTS ANTONY AND THEODOSIUS OF KIEV, FOUNDERS OF RUSSIAN ORTHODOX MONASTICISM; SAINT BARLAAM OF KIEV, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX ABBOT; AND SAINT STEPHEN OF KIEV, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX ABBOT AND BISHOP

THE FEAST OF CHRISTINA ROSSETTI, ANGLICAN POET AND RELIGIOUS WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINTS REMACLUS OF MAASTRICHT, THEODORE OF MAASTRICT, LAMBERT OF MAASTRICHT, HUBERT OF MAASTRICHT AND LIEGE, AND FLORIBERT OF LIEGE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT LANDRADA OF MUNSTERBILSEN, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBESS; AND SAINTS OTGER OF UTRECHT, PLECHELM OF GUELDERLAND, AND WIRO, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARIES

THE FEAST OF SAINT ZITA OF TUSCANY, WORKER OF CHARITY

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Almighty God, beautiful in majesty, majestic in holiness:

You have shown us the splendor of creation

in the work of your servant Andreas Peter Berggreen.

Teach us to drive from the world the ugliness of chaos and disorder,

that our eyes may not be blind to your glory,

and that at length everyone may know the inexhaustible riches

of your new creation in Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Isaiah 28:5-6 or Hosea 14:5-8 or 2 Chronicles 20:20-21

Psalm 96

Philippians 4:8-9 or Ephesians 5:18b-20

Matthew 13:44-52

–Adapted from the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 38

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Feast of Blessed Maria Luiza Merkert (November 14)   Leave a comment

Above:  Blessed Maria Luiza Merkert

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED MARIA LUIZA MERKERT (SEPTEMBER 21, 1817-NOVEMBER 14, 1872)

Cofoundress of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth

Also known as Blessed Maria Luise Merkert

Blessed Maria Luiza Merkert comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Roman Catholic Church.

Anton Merkert (a merchant) and Maria Barbara (Pfitzner) Merkert, of Niesse, Prussia, had two children.  Matilde and her younger sister, Maria Luiza (or Maria Luise).  Our saint, born on September 21, 1817, received the sacrament of baptism five days later.  Anton died on June 21, 1818.  The daughters, educated at the local girls’ school, tended their ailing mother, who died of tuberculosis on July 11, 1842.

The sisters decided to devote the rest of their lives to serving God, present in the abandoned, the sick, and the poor.  Matilde and Maria Luiza became two of the four foundresses of the Association of Sisters for the Assistance of Abandoned Sick Under the Protection of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, on September 27, 1842.  The other two foundresses were Franciszka Werner and Clara Wolff, a Franciscan tertiary.  Matilde died of typhus on May 8, 1846.  On the advice of Father Francis Xavier Fischer, Werner and Blessed Maria Luiza became novices in the Sisters of Saint Charles Borromeo in Prague on Christmas Day, 1846.  Yet Werner and our saint returned to the Association of Sisters for the Assistance of Abandoned Sick Under the Protection of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus on June 30, 1850.  Wolff, injured while on duty in late 1852, died on January 4, 1853.

The Association of Sisters for the Assistance of Abandoned Sick Under the Protection of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus became the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth, named after St. Elizabeth of Hungary (1207-1231), in Niesse, Prussia, on November 19, 1850.  Members, in their homes, cared for abandoned patients.  With diocesan approval (1859), Blessed Maria Luiza became the first Superior General.  She remained in that position until she died of typhus on November 14, 1872.  Our saint was 55 years old.

Holy Mother Church has officially recognized our saint’s sanctity.  Pope John Paul II declared her a Venerable in 2004.  Pope Benedict XVI beatified her in 2007.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 24, 2021 COMMON ERA

GENOCIDE REMEMBRANCE

THE FEAST OF SAINT EGBERT OF LINDISFARNE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK; AND SAINT ADALBERT OF EGMONT, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY

THE FEAST OF SAINT FIDELIS OF SIGMARINGEN, CAPUCHIN FRIAR AND MARTYR, 1622

THE FEAST OF JOHANN WALTER, “FIRST CANTOR OF THE LUTHERAN CHURCH”

THE FEAST OF SAINT MELLITUS, BISHOP OF LONDON, AND ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

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O God, by whose grace your servant Blessed Maria Luiza Merkert,

kindled with the flame of your love, became a burning and a shining light in your Church:

Grant that we also may be aflame with the spirit of love and discipline,

and walk before you as children of light;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Acts 2:42-47a

Psalm 133 or 34:1-8 or 119:161-168

2 Corinthians 6:1-10

Matthew 6:24-33

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 723

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Feast of Blessed Maria Franciszka Siedliska (November 21)   Leave a comment

Above:  Blessed Maria Franciszka Siedliska

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED MARIA FRANCISZKA SIEDLISKA (NOVEMBER 12, 1842-NOVEMBER 21, 1902)

Foundress of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth

Born Franciszka Siedliska

Also known as Mother Mary of Jesus the Good Shepherd

Blessed Maria Franciszka Siedliska comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Roman Catholic Church.

Franciszka Siedliska was a Polish subject of the Russian Empire.  She, born in Roszkowa, Wola Castle, Roszkowa Wola, Poland, Russia, on November 12, 1842, was a daughter of Adolf Adam Siedliska and Cecylia Marianna Morawska.  The family was nominally Roman Catholic.  Our saint, like her parents, was indifferent to religion.

That changed when Siedliska was an adolescent.  Father Leander Lendzian, who prepared her for First Communion (May 1, 1855), sparked religious zeal within our saint.  Siedliska, who dedicated herself to God at her First Communion, decided by 1860 that she wanted to become a nun.  Her parents vigorously opposed this plan.  They prevented her from entering religious life until 1870.  Our saint moved with her parents to Switzerland in 1860, then to Prussia, then to France.  Siedliska and her family returned to their homeland in 1865.  Her father died in 1870.

Our saint finally had an opportunity to enter religious life in 1870, and she availed herself of it.  In 1870, she became a Franciscan tertiary in Lublin.  With the encouragement of Father Lendzian, Siedliska founded a new monastic order, in obedience to the will of God, as she understood it.  Pope Pius IX granted his permission in person on October 1, 1873.  Siedliska founded the Sisters of the the Holy Family of Nazareth at the start of Advent 1875, in Rome.

Our saint led the new order.  On May 1, 1884, she became a nun, as Mary of Jesus the Good Shepherd.  She spent the next years traveling across Europe and in the United States of America, founding schools and communities.  She did his until she, aged 60 years, died in Rome, on November 21, 1902.

Pope John Paul II declared our saint a Venerable in 1980 then beatified her nine years later.

The website of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth reads, in part:

We, the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, are called to extend the Kingdom of God’s love among ourselves and others by the living of the spirit of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, whose lives were centered in the love of God and one another.  We witness to this love through dedicated service to the Church, especially in ministry to the family.

That is a high calling.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 24, 2021 COMMON ERA

GENOCIDE REMEMBRANCE

THE FEAST OF SAINT EGBERT OF LINDISFARNE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK; AND SAINT ADALBERT OF EGMONT, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY

THE FEAST OF SAINT FIDELIS OF SIGMARINGEN, CAPUCHIN FRIAR AND MARTYR, 1622

THE FEAST OF JOHANN WALTER, “FIRST CANTOR OF THE LUTHERAN CHURCH”

THE FEAST OF SAINT MELLITUS, BISHOP OF LONDON, AND ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

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O God, whose blessed Son became poor that we through his poverty might be rich:

Deliver us from an inordinate love of this world, that we, inspired

by the devotion of your servant Blessed Maria Franciszka Siedliska,

may serve you with singleness of heart, and attain to the riches of the age to come;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Song of Songs 8:6-7

Psalm 34

Philippians 3:7-15

Luke 12:33-37 or Luke 9:57-62

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 722

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Feast of Jane Montgomery Campbell (November 14)   1 comment

Above:  The Flag of the United Kingdom

Image in the Public Domain

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JANE MONTGOMERY CAMPBELL (1817-NOVEMBER 15, 1878)

Anglican Hymn Translator and Music Educator

Jane Montgomery Campbell comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).  Little information about Campbell is available.  Hymnal companion volumes that offer verbose biographies of other hymnodists provide just a few facts about our saint.  So be it; they suffice.

Campbell was a devout member of The Church of England.  She, born in Paddington, Hyde Park, London, in 1817, was a daughter of the Reverend A. Montgomery Campbell, the Rector of St. James’s Church, Paddington.  Our saint taught music in her father’s parish school.  She even wrote her own textbook, A Handbook for Singers.  Furthermore, Campbell translated German hymns into English.  She published these translations in various magazines and in two books, A Garland of Songs, or an English Liederkranz (1861) and Children’s Chorale Book (1869), both compiled by the Reverend Charles S. Bere.  Most of these translations have fallen out of the English-language canon of hymnody.  For example, Campbell’s translation of “Silent Night” has become obscure.  Yet our saint’s translation, “We Plow the Fields, and Scatter” has remained standard.  Campbell, aged about 61 years, died in Bovey Tracey, Devonshire, England, on November 15, 1878.

Jane Montgomery Campbell was one of those British Victorian women who brought riches of German hymnody into English hymnody.  She expressed her faith via her work in music–as a teacher and a translator.  Our saint left a fine legacy.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 23, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF TOYOHIKO KAGAWA, RENEWER OF SOCIETY AND PROPHETIC WITNESS IN JAPAN

THE FEAST OF JAKOB BÖHME, GERMAN LUTHERAN MYSTIC

THE FEAST OF MARTIN RINCKART, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT TERESA MARIA OF THE CROSS, FOUNDRESS OF THE CARMELITE SISTERS OF SAINT TERESA OF FLORENCE

THE FEAST OF WALTER RUSSELL BOWIE, EPISCOPAL PRIEST, SEMINARY PROFESSOR, AND HYMN WRITER

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Jane Montgomery Campbell and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Eric Norelius (October 25)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Logo of the Augustana Synod

Image in the Public Domain

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ERIC NORELIUS (OCTOBER 26, 1833-MARCH 15, 1916)

Swedish-American Lutheran Minister

Eric Norelius comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Norelius grew up in The Church of Sweden.  He, born in Hassela, Sweden, on October 26, 1833, was steeped in Lutheranism.  When our saint arrived in New York Harbor on October 31, 1850, he found other Swedish immigrants, mostly Methodists.  When Norelius arrived in Chicago, Illinois, he found a Swedish Episcopalian congregation.  After graduating from Capital University, Columbus, Ohio (1855), Norelius began his Lutheran ministerial career.

In September 1855, Eric Norelius and Inga Peterson Norelius, newlyweds, arrived in Red Wing, Minnesota.  Our saint became the pastor of two churches, one in Red Wing and the other one in Vasa.  The Swedish Lutheran congregations were poor, so the Noreliuses had to leave, for financial reasons, in 1858.   Before they did, however, our saint had founded twelve congregations.

Norelius remained active in ecclesiastical affairs.  Our saint became a journalist.  He had founded a Swedish-language newspaper, the Minnesota Posten, in November 1857.  He assumed the editorship of the Hemlandet, a Swedish-language newspaper which absorbed the Minnesota Posten, in January 1859.  Norelius helped to found the Augustana Synod (originally for Norwegian and Swedish immigrants) in June 1860.  He served as a traveling missionary to Swedes living west of Minneapolis, starting in October 1860.

Norelius returned to the Red Wing-Vasa area, as pastor, in 1861.  He founded a school, the origin of Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota, in 1862.  Our saint also founded the Vasa Children’s Home in 1865.  This was the genesis of Lutheran Social Services  of Minnesota.

Norelius led above the parish level, too.  He served as the President of the Augustana Synod’s Minnesota Conference (1870f).  Then our saint was the President of the Augustana Synod (1874-1881, 1899-1911).  Norelius also wrote and edited.  His published works included The History of the Swedish Lutheran Congregations and the Swedish Americans (two volumes, 1890).  Norelius edited ecclesiastical publications (1870-1882, 1899-1909), too.

Norelius, aged 82 years, died in Vasa, Minnesota, on March 15, 1916.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 23, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF TOYOHIKO KAGAWA, RENEWER OF SOCIETY AND PROPHETIC WITNESS IN JAPAN

THE FEAST OF JAKOB BÖHME, GERMAN LUTHERAN MYSTIC

THE FEAST OF MARTIN RINCKART, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT TERESA MARIA OF THE CROSS, FOUNDRESS OF THE CARMELITE SISTERS OF SAINT TERESA OF FLORENCE

THE FEAST OF WALTER RUSSELL BOWIE, EPISCOPAL PRIEST, SEMINARY PROFESSOR, AND HYMN WRITER

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Almighty God, we praise you for the men and women you have sent

to call the Church to its tasks and renew its life [such as your servant Eric Norelius].

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your Church and proclaim

the reality of your kingdom;  through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

–Adapted from the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 37

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Feast of Elizabeth Comstock (October 30)   Leave a comment

Above:  Elizabeth Comstock

Image in the Public Domain

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ELIZABETH LESLIE ROUS WRIGHT COMSTOCK (OCTOBER 30, 1815-AUGUST 3, 1891)

Anglo-American Quaker Educator, Abolitionist, and Social Reformer

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It is a blessed mission to visit the poor prisoners, and to know “That mercy to the bondman shown.  It is a mercy unto Him.”

–Elizabeth Comstock, quoted in G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006), 320

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Elizabeth Comstock comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via Cady and Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Elizabeth Leslie Rous was a native of England.  She, born in Maidenhead on October 30, 1815, was a daughter of William and Mary Rous.  The Rouses were a Quaker family, and our saint studied at a Friends school in Croyden.  She became a teacher, wife, and mother.  Our saint taught at Ackworth then at Croyden.  In 1847, Rous married Leslie Wright.  The couple had a daughter, Caroline.  Leslie died in 1849.

Elizabeth Leslie Rous Wright and Caroline Wright immigrated to British North America in 1854.  She settled in Belleville, in what is now Ontario.  Our saint, influenced by Elizabeth Fry (1780-1845), became active in meeting the needs of vulnerable people in her community.

Wright married John T. Comstock.  The blended family moved to Rollin, Michigan, in 1858.  Our saint grew into a figure worthy of Fry.  Elizabeth Leslie Rous Wright Comstock became a great orator, a conductor of the Underground Railroad, and an activist on behalf of prison reform, temperance, and the rights of women.  She visited many jails and prisons, Civil War-era hospitals and prison camps, and, in 1864, President Abraham Lincoln.  After the Civil War, our saint worked with the government of the State of Kansas to organize temporary relief to African-American migrants (in 1879-1880).

Our saint moved to Union Springs, New York, in 1885.  She, aged 75 years, died there on August 3, 1891.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 16, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT BERNADETTE OF LOURDES, FRENCH ROMAN CATHOLIC VISIONARY

THE FEAST OF CALVIN WEISS LAUFER, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER AND HYMNODIST

THE FEAST OF ISABELLA GILMORE, ANGLICAN DEACONESS

THE FEAST OF SAINT MIKEL SUMA, ALBANIAN ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST, FRIAR, AND MARTYR, 1950

THE FEAST OF PETER WILLIAMS CASSEY, AFRICAN-AMERICAN EPISCOPAL DEACON; AND HIS WIFE, ANNIE BESANT CASSEY, AFRICAN-AMERICAN EPISCOPAL EDUCATOR

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Almighty God, whose prophets taught us righteousness in the care of your poor:

By the guidance of your Holy Spirit, grant that we may

do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly in your sight;

through Jesus Christ, our Judge and Redeemer, who lives and reigns

with you and the same Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Isaiah 55:11-56:1

Psalm 2:1-2, 10-12

Acts 14:14-17, 21-23

Mark 4:21-29

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 736

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Feast of Levi and Catherine Coffin (October 27)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Coffin House, Fountain City, Indiana

Image in the Public Domain

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LEVI COFFIN, JR. (OCTOBER 28, 1798-SEPTEMBER 16, 1877)

U.S. Quaker Abolitionist and “President of the Underground Railroad”

husband of

CATHERINE WHITE COFFIN (SEPTEMBER 10, 1803-MAY 22, 1881)

U.S. Quaker Abolitionist and “Aunt Katie” of the Underground Railroad

Levi Coffin comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).  Catherine Coffin joins her husband by virtue of having been his wife and his colleague in the struggle for social justice.  One cannot properly tell the story of one Coffin without telling the story of the other Coffin.

Above:  Levi Coffin

Image in the Public Domain

Levi Coffin, born in Guilford County, North Carolina, on October 28, 1798, was a son of Levi and Prudence Williams Coffin.  The Quaker family of abolitionists helped runaway slaves.

Above:  Catherine Coffin

Image in the Public Domain

Catherine White, born in Guilford County, North Carolina, on September 10, 1803, was a daughter of Stanton and Mary White.  That Quaker family of abolitionists was also involved in helping runaway slaves.

Levi and Catherine fell in love.  They married on October 28, 1824.  There in North Carolina, they made their home a station of the Underground Railroad.  Levi became known to slave-hunters as the “President” of the local Underground Railroad.

In 1826, the Coffins moved to Newport (now Fountain City), Indiana.  Levi opened a general store, which became a profitable enterprise.  He and Catherine made their home a station of the Underground Railroad.  They usually had a full house.  The couple raised six children.  Also, about 20,000 slaves passed through the house in twenty-one years.  Slave-hunters knew where to find the Coffins, and threatened them repeatedly.  Yet the Coffins had many local allies.  Levi handled the financial side of the local Underground Railroad operation.  Catherine (“Aunt Katie”) helped to host her guests, cooked for them, and organized a sewing society to make clothes for the escaped slaves.  Many local people contributed financially to the Coffins’ efforts, too.

The Coffins and other conductors of the Underground Railroad were criminals, technically.  They were, according to the federal Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 (then of 1850), committing a property crime.  These conductors of the Underground Railroad were helping property escape to freedom.

By the 1840s, Quakers participating in the Underground Railroad were coming under pressure from their church to cease and desist.  The Coffins persisted, however.  They persisted after their expulsion from their meeting house in 1843.

Levi eventually realized his moral responsibility as a merchant.  He had been selling items that were products of slavery.  Therefore, he joined the Free Produce movement in the 1840s.  After the couple moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1847, he opened a new store and continued in the Free Produce movement.  The couple also continued as conductors of the Underground Railroad.

Eventually, the need for the Underground Railroad ended.  The Coffins visited wounded soldiers in the local military hospital and helped runaway slaves in refugee camps during the Civil War.  After the war, Levi raised funds to help African Americans start businesses and farms.  Also, the couple worked with the Western Freedmen’s Aid Society.

Levi wrote his autobiography, Reminiscences of Levi Coffin, the Reputed President of the Underground Railroad (1876), at the end of his life.  He, aged 78 years, died in Cincinnati on September 16, 1877.

Catherine, aged 77 years, died in Cincinnati on May 22, 1881.

Levi and Catherine had the courage of their nonviolent, moral convictions.  They risked criminal convictions by acting morally to help slaves live as free people.

May you, O reader, and I have the moral courage to behave morally, even when doing so may be criminal.  When the law is unjust, may people act justly.  May they follow the higher law–the highest law, the Golden Rule.

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God of compassion, justice, and freedom, we thank you for the

faithful and courageous lives and legacies of Levi and Catherine Coffin.

May we, who live in a different time and set of circumstances,

derive from their examples inspiration to live according to the Golden Rule,

regardless of the risks to ourselves, in the name of Christ.

May we recognize your image in all other people and treat them accordingly.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Leviticus 19:17-18 and Deuteronomy 6:1-8

Psalm 27

2 John 4-6

Matthew 22:34-40

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 14, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF EDWARD THOMAS DEMBY AND HENRY BEARD DELANY, EPISCOPAL SUFFRAGAN BISHOPS FOR COLORED WORK

THE FEAST OF SAINTS ANTHONY, JOHN, AND EUSTATHIUS OF VILNIUS, MARTYRS IN LITHUANIA, 1347 

THE FEAST OF GEORGE FREDERICK HANDEL, COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF SAINT WANDREGISILUS OF NORMANDY, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT LAMBERT OF LYONS, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT AND BISHOP

THE FEAST OF SAINT ZENAIDA OF TARSUS AND HER SISTER, SAINT PHILONELLA OF TARSUS; AND SAINT HERMOINE OF EPHESUS; UNMERCENARY PHYSICIANS

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Feast of Jean-Baptiste Lamy (October 14)   Leave a comment

Above:  Jean-Baptiste Lamy

Image in the Public Domain

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JEAN-BAPTISTE LAMY (OCTOBER 11, 1814-FEBRUARY 13, 1888)

Roman Catholic Archbishop of Santa Fe, New Mexico

Archbishop Jean-Baptiste Lamy comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Lamy was a Frenchman.  He, born in Lempdes, France, on October 11, 1814, studied at the minor seminary in Clermont then at the major seminary in Montferrand.  The major seminary was an institution of the Sulpician Fathers.  Our saint, ordained a priest on December 22, 1838, ministered in France for a few months before volunteering to become a missionary to the United States of America.

John Baptist Purcell (1800-1883), the first Bishop (1833-1850) then Archbishop (1850-1883) of Cincinnati, had requested missionary priests.  Lamy ministered faithfully in Ohio and Kentucky for years until 1850.  That year, Pope Pius IX appointed our saint the Vicar Apostolic of New Mexico and the Titular Bishop of Algathonice.  Lamy, consecrted on November 24, 1850, set out for Santa Fe with at least twenty-seven other missionaries.  At least two of them died en route.

Lamy and company arrived in Sante Fe in the summer of 1851.  He was the first Roman Catholic bishop in that territory in eight decades.  New Mexico, therefore, was essentially a virgin mission field.  Lamy was not the only bishop with a claim on the territory, though.  The Roman Catholic Church in New Mexico had been under the jurisdiction of José Antonio Laureano de Zuburia, the Bishop of Durango, Mexico. He had visited Santa Fe a few months prior to Lamy’s arrival.  The Bishop of Durango dutifully surrendered his claim to the Roman Catholic Church in New Mexico immediately after Lamy showed him the papal commission.

Above:  The Cathedral Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Image Source = Google Earth

Lamy rebuilt the Roman Catholic Church in New Mexico.  He insisted that priests obey their vows of celibacy.  The violation of that vow had been ubiquitous.  Lamy also presided over the founding of congregations and schools, as well as over the construction of buildings.  Our saint oversaw the construction of Loretto Chapel (completed in 1878) and the Cathedral Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi (completed in 1886), both in French styles.  Along the way, he became the first Bishop (1853-1875) then the first Archbishop (1875-1885) of Santa Fe.

Lamy retired in 1885.  Later that year, he became the Titular Bishop of Cyzicus.

Our saint, aged 73 years, died of pneumonia in Santa Fe on February 13, 1888.

His life provided much inspiration for Willa Cather’s novel, Death Comes for the Archbishop (1927).  Our saint was the model for Bishop Jean Marie Latour.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 7, 2021 COMMON ERA

WEDNESDAY IN HOLY WEEK

THE FEAST OF SAINT TIKHON OF MOSCOW, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX PATRIARCH

THE FEAST OF SAINT GEORGE THE YOUNGER, GREEK ORTHODOX BISHOP OF MITYLENE

THE FEAST OF JAY THOMAS STOCKING, U.S. CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINTS MONTFORD SCOTT, EDMUND GENNINGS, HENRY WALPOLE, AND THEIR FELLOW MARTYRS, 1591 AND 1595

THE FEAST OF RANDALL DAVIDSON, ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

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Heavenly Father, shepherd of your people, we thank you for your servant Jean-Baptiste Lamy,

who was faithful in the care and nurture of your flock;

and we pray, that, following his example and the teaching of his holy life,

we may by your grace grow into the full stature of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3:14-21

John 21:15-17 or Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 38

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