Archive for the ‘Saints of 1860-1869’ Category

Feast of Henry Williams, Marianne Williams, Jane Williams, and William Williams (July 16)   Leave a comment

Above:  New Zealand

Image Source = Google Earth

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HENRY WILLIAMS (FEBRUARY 11, 1792-JULY 16, 1867)

husband of

MARIANNE COLDHAM WILLIAMS (DECEMBER 12, 1793-DECEMBER 16, 1879)

sister-in-law of

JANE NELSON WILLIAMS (1801?-OCTOBER 6, 1896)

wife of

WILLIAM WILLIAMS (JULY 18, 1800-FEBRUARY 9, 1878)

Anglican Bishop of Waiapu

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ANGLICAN MISSIONARIES IN NEW ZEALAND

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INTRODUCTION

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For the sake of clarity, I have restricted the number of specified saints in this post to four.  The extended Williams family included a large number of missionaries and other ecclesiastical figures generation after generation.  Furthermore, my context is North American.  I admit freely that most details of the history of New Zealand are outside my expertise.  I have read, however.  I have also chosen not to clutter this post with too many geographical and historical details, so that one not from New Zealand can understand the Williamses’ context fairly well.

Henry and Marianne Williams are officially saints, according to The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand and Polynesia.  Henry’s feast day in that denomination is July 16.  Marianne’s feast day is December 16.  I add William (Henry’s brother) and Jane (William’s wife and Marianne’s sister-in-law) Williams via their relationships to Henry and Marianne.  These four saints and many others were full partners in ministry, each in his or her unique way.

Christian missionaries from a range of denominations and in various places at different times have frequently been politically unpopular for defending the rights and dignity of indigenous people.  Obeying the Golden Rule leads to confronting social injustice.  In the case of the Williamses, they opposed the exploitation of the Maori by settlers and the government.  Greed, racism, ethnocentrism, and indifference to human suffering were evils the Williamses named and resisted.

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A TAPESTRY OF WILLIAMSES

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Thomas Williams (1724/1725-1770) was a Congregationalist (nonconformist) minister in Gosport, Hampshire, England.  He married Rebecca Isgar on August 6, 1750.  The couple had three children:  Rebecca (b. 1751), Thomas (1753-1804), and Lydia (b. 1757).

Thomas Williams (1753-1804) married Mary Marsh on April 17, 1783.  He eventually served as a Sheriff of Nottingham.  From this devout family, successful in the textiles industry, came six children.  Three of them were Lydia (1788-1859), Henry (1792-1867), and William (1800-1878).  Lydia Williams (1788-1859) married Edward Garrard Marsh (1783-1862), a poet and a priest in The Church of England, as well as a member of the Church Missionary Society.

Henry Williams, born in Gosport, England, on February 11, 1792, joined the Royal Navy in 1806.  He served through 1818.  During his military service, Henry experienced the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812.  Our saint, having had more than his fill of warfare, decided to spend the rest of his life making peace.  He, still a lieutenant, married Marianne Coldham on January 20, 1818.  Edward Garrard Marsh conducted the ceremony.  Shortly thereafter, Henry left the Royal Navy, converted to The Church of England, and commenced preparation to become a missionary.

Marianne Coldham, born in Norwich, England, on December 12, 1793, was a daughter of businessman (and later Sheriff of Nottingham) Wright Coldham (d. 1815) and Anne Coldham (d. 1810).  Our saint had to help raise her siblings and manage the household after her mother died.  The family was Presbyterian.  She was about to become an Anglican, though.  Both Henry and Marianne converted to Anglicanism on February 20, 1818, under the theological influence of Lydia Williams Marsh and Edward Garrard Marsh.

William Williams, born in Nottingham, England, on July 18, 1800, also converted to Anglicanism via Lydia Williams Marsh and Edward Garrard Marsh on February 20, 1818.  William had studied at a Moravian school in Fairfield, Manchester, then at Southwell Grammar School, Southwell, Nottinghamshire.  Next, our saint studied surgery.  In 1822, he matriculated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford.  Two years later, William joined the ranks of Anglican clergymen.  Our saint joined the Church Missionary Society in 1825.  On July 11, 1825, he married Jane Nelson (1801?-1896).

After Thomas Williams, father of Lydia, Henry, and William, died in 1804, Mary Marsh Williams, his widow, moved the family to Southwell, Nottinghamshire.  There she founded a school for girls.  Jane Nelson had been a teacher at that school since 1817 when she married William in 1825.  Jane, born in Nottingham circa 1801, was a daughter of James Nelson and Anna Maria Dale (Nelson).  When Jane married William Williams, she prepared to leave her homeland for all but a few years of the rest of her life.

Henry Williams, ordained a deacon then a priest in 1822, sailed with Marianne and their children for New Zealand that year.  Both husband and wife were officially missionaries from the Church Missionary Society.  They entered a mission field Samuel Marsden (1765-1838), also a member of the Church Missionary Society, had pioneered in 1813-1814.

Above:  Paihia, New Zealand

Image Source = Google Earth

William and Jane Williams joined Henry and Marianne Williams at Paihia, the Bay of Islands, New Zealand, on March 25, 1826.  Henry had begun to experience success as a missionary and the leader of a team of missionaries.  William made a fine addition to that team, which produced Maori translations of the Bible (1827-1857; complete in 1857) and The Book of Common Prayer (1845).  The Dictionary of the New England Language and a Concise Grammar (1844).  Over decades, members of the missionary team spread out across the islands, founded and restaffed mission stations and schools, and defended the rights of the Maori.

Marianne and Jane were invaluable members of the team of missionaries.  Henry acknowledged Marianne as his full partner in missionary work. The sisters-in-law collaborated.  They raised their children together.  Marianne had eleven children, and Jane had nine.  Marianne and Henry had opened a school for the children of missionaries.  Both of them taught in that school, as did Jane.  Marianne and Jane also founded a boarding school for Maori girls at Paihia.  Furthermore, the sisters-in-law provided first aid, health care, and midwifery services.  Henry also tended to the sick as other duties permitted.

The Wiliamses and company were effective missionaries in large part because they respected the Maori.  The missionaries honored all parts of Maori culture that did not contradict the Gospel.  They defended Maori rights and opposed injustices.  Henry and William, alarmed by the government taking of Maori lands, purchased land to hold in trust for the Maori.  This proved controversial.  Missionaries’ efforts to defend Maori rights during the Maori Wars also scandalized political enemies.  Henry Williams, dedicated to being a peacemaker in the name of Christ, learned that reconciliation could be divisive.  Yet the Maori respect for him remained.  Henry was Te Wiremu, literally “The Williams.”  That respect extended to Marianne, Mata Wiremu, or “Mother Williams.”

Above:  Pakaraka, New Zealand

Image Source = Google Earth

Henry Williams, dismissed from the Church Missionary Society in 1849, returned to its fold five years later.  He and Marianne then worked out of Pakaraka, near the the Bay of Islands.  He, 75 years old, died there on July 16, 1767.

At least two sons–Edward (1818-1909) and Samuel (1822-1907)–served as missionaries in New Zealand.  Samuel helped his uncle William found a school for Maori boys at Waerenga-a-hika, seven miles away from Turanga, Poverty Bay, in the 1850s.  Then, in 1875, Samuel helped his aunt Jane found a school for Maori girls at Napier.

Above:  Napier, New Zealand

Image Source = Google Earth

William Williams, based at different places in New Zealand over time, spent all but a few years from 1826 to 1878 in that country.  He, the archdeacon of the Diocese of East Cape (November 27, 1842f), spent 1850-1853 with his family in England.  The reason for that sojourn was Henry’s political difficulty with the Church Missionary Society.  William, back in New Zealand, served as the first Bishop of Waiapu (1859-1876).  He resigned after suffering a stroke in 1876.  Bishop William Williams died in Napier, New Zealand, on February 9, 1878.  He was 77 years old.

Two descendants held that office, too.  Son Leonard (1829-1916) served as the third Bishop of Waiapu (1895-1909).  Leonard’s son Herbert (1860-1937) was the sixth Bishop of Waiapu (1930-1937).

Marianne, 86 years old, died in Pakaraka on December 16, 1879.

Jane died in Napier on October 6, 1896.

The legacies of these Williamses continue, fortunately and to the glory of God.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 7, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS RALPH MILNER, ROGER DICKINSON, AND LAWRENCE HUMPHREY, ENGLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYRS, 1591

THE FEAST OF FRANCIS FLORENTINE HAGEN, U.S. MORAVIAN MINISTER AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF SAINT HEDDA OF WESSEX, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF LEO SOWERBY, EPISCOPAL COMPOSER AND “DEAN OF CHURCH MUSIC”

THE FEAST OF THOMAS HELMORE, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND ARRANGER AND COMPOSER OF HYMN TUNES

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Ever-loving God, you called your servants Henry, William, Jane, and Marianne Williams

to advance the early New Zealand mission by their determination and ability;

give us patience and unwavering courage to put all our talents at your service and to make your love known;

through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Isaiah 40:9-11

Psalm 119:129-136

2 Corinthians 1:12-14

Matthew 5:1-12

–Adapted from The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand, and Polynesia

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Feast of Louisa Marthens (July 16)   3 comments

Above:  The Sisters’ House, Passavant Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Image in the Public Domain

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CATHARINE LOUISA MARTHENS (JULY 17, 1828-JANUARY 12, 1899)

First Lutheran Deaconess Consecrated in the United States of America, 1850

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And the King will answer them, “Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brethren, you did it to me.”

–Matthew 25, 40, Revised Standard Version, Second Edition (1971)

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Deaconess Catharine Louisa Marthens (the spelling of her name on her grave marker) comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year With American Saints (2006).

Marthens, from a devout Lutheran family, found her vocation via her pastor and mentor, William Alfred Passavant, Sr. (1821-1894).  Marthens, born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on July 17, 1828, was a daughter of Henry Christian Marthens (1782-1857) and Catherine Slator Marthens (1788-1868).  Our saint learned her catechism from Passavant, the pastor (1844-1855) of the First English Evangelical Lutheran Church, Pittsburgh.  Passavant had an interest in social services, especially for the most vulnerable members of society.  He founded hospitals and orphanages from 1849 to 1871.  In 1849, at Passavant’s invitation, German Lutheran minister Theodor Fliedner (1800-1864), the renewer of the order of deaconesses in the Lutheran Church, visited Pittsburgh.  Fliedner brought four deaconesses with him.  The North American Lutheran female diaconate had begun.

Through Passavant’s influence, Marthens became interested in the deaconess movement.  She even visited Germany to observe Fliedner and the deaconesses there in action.  Marthens had found her vocation.  In 1850, at First English Evangelical Lutheran Church, Pittsburgh, Passavant consecrated her a deaconess.  The name of the authority for which our saint worked was the Institution of Protestant Deaconesses.  Marthens worked at Passavant’s hospital in Pittsburgh; she was both a nurse and an administrator.  When a mob, fearful of cholera patients, attacked, our saint protected her patients.  Later, she served as the first matron of the orphanage in Pittsburgh.  In 1859, Marthens helped to start the orphanage in Germantown.  Subsequently, she served as the matron of the girls’ orphanages in Rochester, Pennyslvania, and Jacksonville, Illinois, in order.

Marthens, aged 70 years, died in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on January 12, 1899.  She had spent her life well, devoting most of it in the service of Christ, present in the “least of these.”

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 6, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JOHN WYCLIFFE AND JAN HUS, REFORMERS OF THE CHURCH

THE FEAST OF GEORGE DUFFIELD, JR.; AND HIS SON, SAMUEL DUFFIELD; U.S. PRESBYTERIAN MINISTERS AND HYMN WRITERS

THE FEAST OF HENRY THOMAS SMART, ENGLISH ORGANIST AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF JOSIAH CONDER, ENGLISH JOURNALIST AND CONGREGATIONALIST HYMN WRITER; AND HIS SON, EUSTACE CONDER, ENGLISH CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF OLUF HANSON SMEBY, U.S. LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

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Lord God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served,

and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary;

through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-14

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 37

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Feast of St. Joseph of Damascus (July 10)   1 comment

Above:  Christian Quarter, Damascus, Syria, Ottoman Empire, July 1860

Image in the Public Domain

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YOUSSEF IBN JIRJIS MOUSA IBN MOUHANA AL-HADDAD (MAY 15, 1793-JULY 10, 1860)

Syrian Orthodox Priest and Martyr, 1860

Also known as Joseph George Hadad Firzli

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I planted the seed in the true vineyard of Christ, and I am waiting for the harvest.

–St. Joseph of Damascus

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St. Joseph of Damascus comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch, the Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America, and his connection to the family of St. Raphael of Brooklyn (1860-1915).

St. Joseph, born in Beirut on May 15, 1793, came from a poor and devout Orthodox family.  He was intelligent and intellectual, but poverty interrupted his formal education.  Nevertheless, our saint read deeply and widely.  He mastered Arabic, Hebrew, and Greek, for example.  St. Joseph translated parts of the Bible into Arabic.  Our saint, a weaver from his youth and a married man at age 19, fathered three sons–Moses, Abraham, and Joseph.

St. Joseph, ordained to the priesthood in 1817, when 24 years old, ministered at the old Patriarchal Cathedral of the Dormition of the Most Holy Theotokos, located in the Old City, Damascus, Syria.  Starting in 1836, he was the Director of the Patriarchal School, Damascus.  St. Joseph built the school into the leading institution of Orthodox higher education in the Middle East.  He trained many church leaders.

St. Joseph contended against a variety of obstacles during his ministry.  Protestant missionaries vexed him.  Roman Catholic missionaries did, too.  Any outside Christian who did not understand the context of the Arab culture became a problem for St. Joseph.  At the end, though, Muslim violence against Christians created many martyrs, including our saint.

The Mount Lebanon Civil War (May 23-July 11, 1860) was a brief and bloody conflict.  It began as a struggle between Druze and Maronite Catholics in Lebanon, then part of Syria, itself part of the Ottoman Empire.  In July, the conflict spread to Damascus.  Muslim mobs killed Christians and burned churches while other Muslims risked their lives to protect their Christian neighbors.  Thousands of Christians died in Damascus during two days.  During and after the conflict, many Christians fled Damascus.  The parents of St. Raphael of Brooklyn (1860-1915) fled to Beirut after the events of July 1860.  Many other Christians sought shelter elsewhere during and after the conflict.  Some, being infirm, had to stay home in Damascus.

Many Orthodox Christians of Damascus had gathered at the Patriarchal Cathedral on July 9, 1860.  St. Joseph left his home and carried the Reserved Sacrament with him, as he traveled through the Old City of Damascus.  His journey was hazardous; he had to walk across rooftops and jump above narrow streets.  Along the way, he visited home-bound parishioners, hearing confessions, reconciling them, and giving communion.  On the morning of July 10, 1860, a mob burned the Patriarchal Cathedral.  Few people got out alive.  The mob shot or forced most who fled to return to the interior of the burning building.

St. Joseph got out alive.  He spent most of his little remaining time hearing confessions, reconciling people, and giving communion.  Soon, of course, hostiles with axes surrounding our saint.  He consumed the hosts and the consecrated wine of the Reserved Sacrament before he received the crown of martyrdom.  His murderers dragged his mutilated corpse through the streets, for further indignities.  St. Joseph was 67 years old.

St. Joseph and the other martyrs of Damascus in 1860 have been official saints since 1993.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 3, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS FLAVIAN AND ANATOLIUS OF CONSTANTINOPLE, PATRIARCHS; AND SAINTS AGATHO, LEO II, AND BENEDICT II, BISHOPS OF ROME; DEFENDERS OF CHRISTOLOGICAL ORTHODOXY

THE FEAST OF SAINT DIONYSIUS OF ALEXANDRIA, PATRIARCH OF ALEXANDRIA, AND CHURCH FATHER; SAINT EUSEBIUS OF LAODICEA, BISHOP OF LAODICEA; AND SAINT ANATOLIUS OF ALEXANDRIA, BISHOP OF LAODICEA

THE FEAST OF SAINT HELIODORUS OF ALTINUM, ASSOCIATE OF SAINT JEROME, AND BISHOP OF ALTINUM

THE FEAST OF IMMANUEL NITSCHMANN, GERMAN-AMERICAN MORAVIAN MINISTER AND MUSICIAN; HIS BROTHER-IN-LAW, JACOB VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP, MUSICIAN, COMPOSER, AND EDUCATOR; HIS SON, WILLIAM HENRY VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP; HIS BROTHER, CARL ANTON VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN MINISTER, MUSICIAN, COMPOSER, AND EDUCATOR; HIS DAUGHTER, LISETTE (LIZETTA) MARIA VAN VLECK MEINUNG; AND HER SISTER, AMELIA ADELAIDE VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN COMPOSER AND EDUCATOR

THE FEAST OF JOHN CENNICK, BRITISH MORAVIAN EVANGELIST AND HYMN WRITER

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Gracious Lord, in every age you have sent men and women

who have given their lives for the message of your love.

Inspire us with the memory of those martyrs for the Gospel

[like your servants Saint Joseph of Damascus and the other martyrs of Damascus in 1860]

whose faithfulness led them in the way of the cross,

and give us courage to bear full witness with our lives to your Son’s victory over sin and death;

through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Ezekiel 20:40-42

Psalm 5

Revelation 6:9-11

Mark 8:34-38

–Adapted from Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 37

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Feast of Thomas Helmore (July 7)   Leave a comment

Above:  Thomas Helmore

Image in the Public Domain

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THOMAS HELMORE (MAY 7, 1811-JULY 6, 1890)

Anglican Priest and Arranger and Composer of Hymn Tunes

Thomas Helmore comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).  Perhaps his most famous contribution to Christian worship is his arrangement of VENI IMMANUEL for “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel.”

Above:  Lichfield Cathedral

Image Source = Google Earth

Helmore, from nonconforming stock, found his spiritual home in High Church Anglicanism.  Our saint, born in Kiddenminster, Worcestershire, England, on May 7, 1811, was a son of Olive Holloway and Congregationalist minister Thomas Helmore.  (Aside:  Would suffixes, such as “Sr.,” “Jr.,” and “III” have been too much to use, to help keep relatives with the same names separate in one’s mind?  I guess so.)  Thomas, Jr., (or III or whatever), studied at Magdalen College, Oxford (B.A., 1840; M.A., 1845).  He also joined the ranks of priests in The Church of England in 1840.  Helmore served as the Curate of St. Michael’s Church, Lichfield, and the Vicar of Lichfield Cathedral, from 1840 to 1842.  He was frequently the Vice-Principal and Presenter of St. Mark’s College, Chelsea (1842-1977); the Master of Choristers of the Chapel Royal (1846f); and a priest at the Chapel Royal (1847f).  One of his students at the Chapel Royal was Sir Arthur Sullivan (1842-1900), one half of Gilbert and Sullivan.

Helmore became a leader in restoring plainchant in The Church of England.  He also composed hymn tunes for some of John Mason Neale‘s translations of Latin and Greek texts.  Furthermore, Helmore edited volumes of chants and anthems.  In 1855, our saint translated Treatise on Choir and Chorus Singing, by François-Joseph Fétis (1784-1871).  Helmore’s other publications included:

  1. The Psalter Noted (1849),
  2. The Canticles Noted (1849),
  3. A Manual of Plainsong (1850),
  4. The Hymnal Noted (1852-1854),
  5. A Brief Directory of Plain Song (1853),
  6. Carols for Christmas (1853),
  7. Carols for Easter (1853),
  8. St. Mark’s College Chant Book (1863),
  9. The Canticles Accented (1870),
  10. A Catechism of Music (1878),
  11. Plain-Song (1878), and
  12. A Fuller Directory of the Plain Song of the Holy Communion Service (1881).

Helmore, 78 years old, died in London on July 6, 1890.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 3, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS FLAVIAN AND ANATOLIUS OF CONSTANTINOPLE, PATRIARCHS; AND SAINTS AGATHO, LEO II, AND BENEDICT II, BISHOPS OF ROME; DEFENDERS OF CHRISTOLOGICAL ORTHODOXY

THE FEAST OF SAINT DIONYSIUS OF ALEXANDRIA, PATRIARCH OF ALEXANDRIA, AND CHURCH FATHER; SAINT EUSEBIUS OF LAODICEA, BISHOP OF LAODICEA; AND SAINT ANATOLIUS OF ALEXANDRIA, BISHOP OF LAODICEA

THE FEAST OF SAINT HELIODORUS OF ALTINUM, ASSOCIATE OF SAINT JEROME, AND BISHOP OF ALTINUM

THE FEAST OF IMMANUEL NITSCHMANN, GERMAN-AMERICAN MORAVIAN MINISTER AND MUSICIAN; HIS BROTHER-IN-LAW, JACOB VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP, MUSICIAN, COMPOSER, AND EDUCATOR; HIS SON, WILLIAM HENRY VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP; HIS BROTHER, CARL ANTON VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN MINISTER, MUSICIAN, COMPOSER, AND EDUCATOR; HIS DAUGHTER, LISETTE (LIZETTA) MARIA VAN VLECK MEINUNG; AND HER SISTER, AMELIA ADELAIDE VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN COMPOSER AND EDUCATOR

THE FEAST OF JOHN CENNICK, BRITISH MORAVIAN EVANGELIST AND HYMN WRITER

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Thomas Helmore)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Feast of Arthur Henry Messiter (July 2)   Leave a comment

Above:  Trinity Church, Wall Street, New York, New York, 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Image Contributor = Detroit Publishing Company

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-det-4a08581

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ARTHUR HENRY MESSITER (APRIL 12, 1834-JULY 2, 1916)

Episcopal Musician and Hymn Tune Composer

Arthur Henry Messiter comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).

Above:  St. John’s Episcopal Church, Poultney, Vermont

Image Source = Google Earth

Messiter was a church musician.  He, born in Frome, Somersetshire, England, on April 12, 1834, was a son of George Messiter and Marion S. Malin (Messiter).  Our saint studied at a private school then studied music in Northamptonshire for four years.  He immigrated to the United States of America in 1863.  Messiter was a chorister at Trinity Church, Wall Street, New York, New York, before leaving to serve as the organist at St. John’s Episcopal Church, Poultney, Vermont.  After a stint as the organist at St. James the Less Episcopal Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, our saint began his service (1866-1897) as the organist of Trinity Church, Wall Street, New York, New York.

Messiter’s service while at Trinity Church, Wall Street, was distinguished and not restricted to the parish level.  He maintained the highest standard of English cathedral music at Trinity Church.  Our saint also shared that high standard with the denomination.  He served as the music editor of the 1893 musical edition of the 1892 Episcopal Hymnal and as the editor of the Choir-Office Book:  The Daily and Occasional Offices and the Order of Holy Communion Set to Anglican and Plain-Song Music as Used in Trinity Church, New York, New York (1891).  Our saint also arranged The Psalter:  Pointed for Singing and Set to Music, According to the Use of Trinity Parish, New York (1889).  Messiter also composed MARION, a hymn tune usually paired with the text, “Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart.”  Furthermore, our saint, music historian at Trinity Church, wrote A History of the Choir and Music of Trinity Church, New York, from Its Organization to the Year 1897 (1906).

Messiter married Margaret S. Gaddis (1842-1938) in 1871.  They had a son, Arthur M. Messiter (1878-1898).

Messiter, aged 82 years, died in New York, New York, on July 2, 1916.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 29, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL, APOSTLES AND MARTYRS

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Arthur Henry Messiter)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Feast of Robert Seymour Bridges (April 20)   1 comment

Above:  Robert Seymour Bridges

Image in the Public Domain

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ROBERT SEYMOUR BRIDGES (OCTOBER 23, 1844-APRIL 21, 1930)

Anglican Hymn Writer and Hymn Translator

Robert Seymour Bridges comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).  His works available at archive.org are numerous.  They include his Poetical Works (Volumes I, II, III, IV, V, and VI).

Bridges, born on the Isle of Thanet, England, on October 23, 1844, became a great figure in English-language hymnody.  He, educated at Eton then at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, graduated.  Then he traveled abroad for two years.  Next, our saint studied medicine at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, London.  After practicing medicine in that hospital, Bridges ceased to do so in 1882.  He, his health failing, moved to Yattendon, Berkshire, and recovered.  Bridges married Mary Monica Waterhouse in 1884.  He lived in Oxford from 1907 to her death.

Bridges, post-medical career, devoted himself to writing.  He became the Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom in 1913.  Other literary contributions, some of which predated his retirement from medicine, included the texts in Shorter Poems (1890) and The Testament of Beauty (1929).  Our saint also wrote and translated hymns.  Anyone who has sung “Ah, Holy Jesus, How Hast Thou Offended,” “O Sacred Head, Sore Wounded,” and/or “When Morning Gilds the Skies” has sung some of our saint’s translations.  Bridges’s original hymns included “Rejoice, O Lord, in God Thy Might.”  Our saint also served as an editor of The Yattendon Hymnal (1899, 1920), to which he contributed hymns.

Bridges died in Oxford, England, on April 21, 1930.  He was 85 years old.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 6, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF FRANKLIN CLARK FRY, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED LUTHERAN CHURCH IN AMERICA AND THE LUTHERAN CHURCH IN AMERICA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CLAUDE OF BESANÇON, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST, MONK, ABBOT, AND BISHOP

THE FEAST OF HENRY JAMES BUCKOLL, AUTHOR AND TRANSLATOR OF HYMNS

THE FEAST OF JOHANN FRIEDRICH HERTZOG, GERMAN LUTHERAN HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM KETHE, PRESBYTERIAN HYMN WRITER

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Robert Seymour Bridges and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Elizabeth Rundle Charles (March 29)   1 comment

Above:  The Flag of England

Image in the Public Domain

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ELIZABETH RUNDLE CHARLES (JANUARY 28, 1828-MARCH 28 OR APRIL 1, 1896)

Anglican Writer, Hymn Translator, and Hymn Writer

Also known as Elizabeth Rundle-Charles

Elizabeth Rundle Charles come to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).

Our saint, born Elizabeth Rundle, was a daughter of John Rundle, M.P.  She, born in Tavistock, Devonshire, England, on January 28, 1828, received training at home.  In 1851, she married barrister Andrew Paton Charles (d. 1868).  Our saint distinguished herself as a novelist, a poet, a hagiographer, a hymn writer and translator, a musician, and a painter.  She began her literary career in 1850, when she translated her first German hymn.  Our saint went on to translate texts from Swedish, German, and Latin.

Our saint’s works available at archive.org are:

  1. Mary, the Handmaid of the Lord (1854);
  2. Te Deum Laudamus:  Christian Life in Song–The Song and the Singers (First Edition, 1858; Second Edition, ?; Third Edition, ?; Fourth Edition, ?; Fifth Edition, 1897);
  3. The Black Ship:  With Other Allegories and Parables (1862);
  4. The Voice of Christian Life in Song; or, Hymns and Hymn-Writers of Many Lands and Ages (First Edition, 1858; Second Edition, 1865)
  5. The Early Dawn; or, Sketches of Christian Life in England in the Olden Time (1864);
  6. Chronicles of the Schönberg-Cotta Family (1865);
  7. Sketches of Christian Life in England in the Olden Time; Sketches of the United Brethren of Bohemia and Moravia (1865);
  8. Tales and Sketches of Christian Life in Other Lands and Ages (1865);
  9. The Martyrs of Spain, and the Liberators of Holland (1865);
  10. The Two Vocations; Or, the Sisters of Mercy at Home:  A Tale (1865);
  11. The Draytons and the Davenants:  A Story of the Civil Wars (1866);
  12. Wanderings Over Bible Lands and Seas (1866);
  13. Winifred Bertram and the World She Lived In (1866);
  14. On Both Sides of the Sea:  A Story of the Commonwealth and the Restoration (1867);
  15. The Women of the Gospels, the Three Wakings, and Other Verses (1868);
  16. Watchwords for the Welfare of Life; from Dr. Martin Luther (1869);
  17. The Diary of Brother Bartholomew, A Monk in the Abbey of Marienthal, in the Odenwald, in the Twelfth Century (1871);
  18. The Victory of the Vanquished:  A Story of the First Century (1871);
  19. Against the Stream:  The Story of an Heroic Age in England (1873);
  20. Conquering and to Conquer (1875)
  21. The Bertram Family (1877);
  22. Lapsed, But Not Lost:  A Story of Roman Carthage (1878);
  23. Joan the Maid, Deliverer of Deliverer of France and England:  A Story of the Fifteenth Century, Done Into Modern English (1879);
  24. Martyrs and Saints of the First Twelve Centuries (1885);
  25. Three Martyrs of the Nineteenth Century:  Studies from the Lives of Livingstone, Gordon, and Patteson (1885);
  26. Diary of Mrs. Kitty Trevylyan:  A Story of the Times of Whitefield and the Wesleys (1886);
  27. Songs Old and New (1887);
  28. Early Christian Missions of Ireland, Scotland, and England (1893);
  29. Attila and His Conquerors:  A Story of the Days of St. Patrick and St. Leo the Great (1894);
  30. The Ravens and the Angel: With Other Stories and Parables (1894); and
  31. Ewan Christian:  Architect (1896).

Our saint’s hymn translations include:

  1. Dost Thou In a Manger Lie,” and
  2. Be Not Dismayed, Thou Little Flock.”

Her original hymns include:

  1. “Praise Ye the Father,” and
  2. Never Further Than Thy Cross.”

Her hymnary.org page is here.

Our saint, aged 68 years, died in Hampstead Heath (near London) on March 28 or April 1, 1896.  By then she used Rundle-Charles as her surname.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 5, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT DOROTHEUS OF TYRE, BISHOP OF TYRE, AND MARTYR, CIRCA 362

THE FEAST OF BLISS WIANT, U.S. METHODIST MINISTER, MISSIONARY, MUSICIAN, MUSIC EDUCATOR, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR, ARRANGER, AND HARMONIZER; AND HIS WIFE, MILDRED ARTZ WIANT, U.S. METHODIST MISSIONARY, MUSICIAN, MUSIC EDUCATOR, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF INI KOPURIA, FOUNDER OF THE MELANESIAN BROTHERHOOD

THE FEAST OF MAURICE BLONDEL, FRENCH ROMAN CATHOLIC PHILOSOPHER AND FORERUNNER OF THE SECOND VATICAN COUNCIL

THE FEAST OF ORLANDO GIBBONS, ANGLICAN ORGANIST AND COMPOSER; THE “ENGLISH PALESTRINA”

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Elizabeth Rundle Charles and others, who have composed and translated hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Alexander Clark (March 6)   Leave a comment

Above:  Alexander Clark

Image Source = Matthew Simpson, Cyclopedia of Methodism, 5th.ed. (1882), 222

Digital Photograph by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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ALEXANDER CLARK (MARCH 10, 1834-JULY 6, 1879)

U.S. Methodist Protestant Minister, Hymn Writer, and Hymnal Editor

Alexander Clark comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via several sources.  These include The Methodist Hymnal (1966), the companion volume to The Methodist Hymnal (1935), and the fifth edition (1882) of Bishop Matthew Simpson’s Cyclopedia of Methodism.  Internet sleuthing rounds out most of the remainder of research.

Clark was a journalist and a minister.  He, born in Jefferson County, Ohio, on March 10, 1834, was a son of Samuel Clark (1797-1880) and Christine McKenzie (Clark) (1805-1886).  Samuel, of Scots-Irish ancestry, was a teacher and a classical scholar.  Christine was a Scottish immigrant.  Our saint worked as a teacher from 19 to 23 years of age.  During that time, he founded a newspaper, The Student Visitor.  It became The School Day Magazine, which, in the late 1870s, merged into St. Nicholas (extant 1873-1940).  He married Anne Marie Daughaday (1834-1923).  They had to children (born 1856-1879).

Clark, ordained a minister in the Methodist Protestant Church (extant 1830-1939), served as a pastoral capacity in four congregations.

  1. He was pastor of Fifth Avenue Methodist Protestant Church, New Brighton, Pennsylvania, from 1861 to 1863.  This congregation became Fifth Avenue Methodist Church via the merger of 1939 then Fifth Avenue United Methodist Church via the merger of 1968.  The congregation has amalgamated into New Brighton United Methodist Church.
  2. Clark was assistant pastor (under Thomas H. Stockton, 1808-1868) of the Church of the New Testament, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1863-1864.  Stockton had been pastor of First Methodist Protestant Church, Philadelphia, from 1838 to 1847.  The Church of the New Testament was an independent congregation he led from 1856 to 1868.
  3. Clark was pastor of Union Chapel (Independent Methodist), Cincinnati, Ohio, from 1864 to 1866.  Union Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church, formed in 1853, split in 1861, during a controversy over the newly-appointed pastor.  A congregation continued as Union Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church, which disbanded in the 1870s.  Union Chapel (Independent Methodist) joined The Methodist Church (extant 1858-1877) in 1867.  (Much of the West and the North of the Methodist Protestant Church had, in the name of opposing slavery, withdrawn in 1858 and formed the Methodist Protestant Association.  They adopted the name “The Methodist Church” in 1862 then retained that name five years later, during a merger with other Methodists who also opposed the episcopacy.  The Methodist Church (1858-1877) reunited with its parent denomination, the Methodist Protestant Church, in 1877.
  4. Clark was pastor of First Methodist Protestant Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from 1866 to 1870.  This congregation outgrew its building on Fifth Avenue in 1892.  The congregation eventually amalgamated into First United Methodist Church.

Clark left parish ministry in 1870.  He became the editor of The Methodist Recorder and Our Morning Guide, denominational periodicals.  Our saint also visited the General Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (1874), and the Methodist Episcopal Church (1876), as a fraternal delegate.  In 1871, he edited The Voice of Praise, the new hymnal of The Methodist Church (1858-1877).  The Voice of Praise (1871) had a brief life as an official resource; The Tribute of Praise replaced it as the hymnal of the reunited Methodist Protestant Church in 1882.  Clark wrote at least 12 hymns.  His most popular text was “Heavenly Father, Bless Me Now.”

Clark’s duties entailed some traveling across the United States.  He was in Atlanta, Georgia, on a lecture tour when he became severely ill in June 1879.  Governor Alfred H. Colquitt (in office 1877-1882), a Methodist minister, had Clark moved from the hotel to the Governor’s Mansion.  Our saint, 45 years old, died there on July 6, 1879.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 3, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN XXIII, BISHOP OF ROME

THE FEAST OF CHRISTIAN GOTTFRIED GEISLER AND JOHANN CHRISTIAN GEISLER, SILESIAN MORAVIAN ORGANISTS AND COMPOSERS; AND JOHANNES HERBST, GERMAN-AMERICAN ORGANIST, COMPOSER, AND BISHOP

THE FEAST OF FRANCES RIDLEY HAVERGAL, ENGLISH HYMN WRITER AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF OLE T. (SANDEN) ARNESON, U.S. NORWEGIAN LUTHERAN HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF WILL CAMPBELL, AGENT OF RECONCILIATION

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Alexander Clark and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of William Henry Draper (December 18)   2 comments

Above:  William Henry Draper

Image in the Public Domain

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WILLIAM HENRY DRAPER (DECEMBER 19, 1855-AUGUST 9, 1933)

Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator

William Henry Draper comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).

Draper was a priest in The Church of England.  He, born in Kenilworth, Warwickshire, England, on December 19, 1855, was a son of Henry Draper and Lucy Mary Draper.  Our saint studied at Cheltenham College then at Keble College, Oxford.  Draper, ordained in 1880, was, in order:

  1. Curate of St. Mary’s Church, Shrewsbury (1880-1883);
  2. Vicar of Alfreton (1883-1889);
  3. Vicar of the Abbey Church, Shrewsbury (1889-1899);
  4. Rector of Adel, Leeds (1899-1919);
  5. Master of the Temple, London (1919-1930); and
  6. Vicar of Axbridge (1930-1933).

Draper left a literary legacy.  He edited Seven Spiritual Songs by Thomas Campion (1919) and Hymns for the Tunes by Orlando Gibbons (1925).  Draper translated Petrarch‘s Secretum (published in 1911).  His published original works included The Victoria Book of Hymns (1897) and Hymns for Holy Week (1898).  Draper’s hymns, both original and translated, numbered in excess of 60.  They included “In Our Day of Thanksgiving” and “Lord, Through This Holy Week.”  His translations included, “All Creatures of Our God and King,” published in 1926.

Draper, aged 77 years, died in Clifton, Bristol, on August 9, 1933.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 31, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE DAY OF PENTECOST, YEAR A

THE FEAST OF THE VISITATION OF MARY TO ELIZABETH

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

William Henry Draper and others, who have composed and translated hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley (May 26)   1 comment

Above:  Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley

Image in the Public Domain

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HARDWICKE DRUMMOND RAWNSLEY (SEPTEMBER 28, 1851-MAY 28, 1920)

Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

Also known as H. D. Rawnsley

Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).

Rawnsley left a fine legacy, much of it indirect.  He, born in Shiplake, England, on September 28, 1851, was a son of Canon Drummond Rawnsley, the Vicar of Shiplake.  Rawnsley, Sr., was a friend of Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892).  Our saint’s godfather was Edward Thring (1821-1887), Headmaster of Uppingham School and brother of Godfrey Thring (1823-1903).  Rawnsley, Jr., studied at Uppingham School then at Baillol College, Oxford (Class of 1874).  He took a special interest in natural science at Oxford.

Rawnsley became a priest in The Church of England.  He, ordained in 1875, was the Curate of St. Barnabas’s Church, Bristol (1875-1877).  While the Vicar of Wray (1877-1883), our saint married Edith Fletcher (d. 1916) in 1878.  From 1883 to 1917, he was the Incumbent of Crosthwaite, near Keswick.  He became the Canon of Carlisle and the Chaplain to the King in 1909.

Rawnsley was active in literary and environmental pursuits.  He wrote biographies and books of poetry.  He also wrote at least seven hymns.  Two of them were “Father, Whose Will is Life and Good” (1922) and “Saviour, Who Didst Healing Give” (1905).  (Our saint was an enthusiastic supporter of medical missionary work.)  Rawnsley also founded and served as the secretary of the National Trust for Places of Historical Interest and Natural Beauty.  He helped to conserve much natural beauty in the Lake District.  One of the other conservationists was Beatrix Potter (1886-1943), who was writing and illustrating The Tale of Peter Rabbit (1902).  He encouraged her in various pursuits, including that book.

Rawnsley, retied and widowed, married Eleanor Foster Simpson (d. 1959) in 1918.  Their union was brief.  He, 70 years old, died in Grasmere, England, on May 28, 1920.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 26, 2020 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT AUGUSTINE OF CANTERBURY, ARCHBISHOP

THE FEAST OF HARDWICKE DRUMMOND RAWNSLEY, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT LAMBERT PÉLOGUIN OF VENCE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK AND BISHOP

THE FEAST OF SAINT PHILIP NERI, THE APOSTLE OF ROME AND THE FOUNDER OF THE CONGREGATION OF THE ORATORY

THE FEAST OF SAINT QUADRATUS THE APOLOGIST, EARLY CHRISTIAN APOLOGIST

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God of creation, we thank you for all that you have made and called good:

Grant that we may rightly serve and conserve the earth,

and live at peace with all of your creatures;

through Jesus Christ, the firstborn of all creation,

in whom you are reconciling the world to yourself.  Amen.

Job 14:7-9

Psalm 104:24-31

Romans 1:20-23

Mark 16:14-15

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 732

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