Archive for the ‘Saints of 1890-1899’ Category

Feast of Blessed Narcyz Putz (December 5)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Flag of Poland, 1927-1980

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED NARCYZ PUTZ (OCTOBER 28, 1877-DECEMBER 5, 1942)

Polish Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1942

Alternative feast day = June 12 (Polish Martyrs of World War II)

Blessed Narcyz Putz comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Roman Catholic Church.

Putz was originally a subject of the Russian Empire.  He, born in Sieraków (near Warsaw), on October 28, 1877, was a son of Józefa Brodniewicz and her husband, innkeeper Wladyslaw Putz.  Our saint completed his local education in 1898 then studied theology in Poznan and Gniezno.

Putz, ordained to the priesthood on December 5, 1901, served in various parishes.  Our saint also became active in Polish patriotic organizations.  With the independence of Poland (1919), after World War I, Putz entered a new phase of his life.  He served at Bydzoscz (1920-1025) then at Poznan (1925-1939).  Our saint fulfilled the usual priestly duties, and was a capable youth pastor.  Putz was also active in civic life, especially in matters related to public libraries, public parks, public theaters, and local economic development.

German forces invaded Poland on September 1, 1939.  Nazi authorities arrested Putz twice.  They apprehended him on October 4, 1939, then released him two weeks later.  The second arrest–that of November 9, 1939–was permanent.  Nazi authorities eventually transferred Putz to the concentration camp at Dachau then to the concentration camp at Gusen then back to the concentration camp at Dachau.  During his incarceration, our saint suffered torments and ministered to his fellow prisoners.  Putz, suffering from heart disease and pneumonia, died at Dachau on December 5, 1942.  Our saint was 67 years old.

Pope John Paul II declared Putz a Venerable then beatified him in 1999.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 3, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS JOANNA, MARY, AND SALOME, WITNESSES TO THE RESURRECTION

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Almighty God, by whose grace and power your holy martyr Blessed Narcyz Putz

triumphed over suffering and was faithful even to death:

Grant us, who now remember him in thanksgiving,

to be so faithful in our witness to you in this world,

that we may receive with him the crown of life;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) 51:1-12

Psalm 116 or 116:1-8

Revelation 7:13-17

Luke 12:2-12

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 714

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Feast of M. Woolsey Stryker (December 3)   Leave a comment

Above:  Melancthon Woolsey Stryker

Image in the Public Domain

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MELANCTHON WOOLSEY STRYKER (JANUARY 7, 1851-DECEMBER 6, 1929)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Educator, Author, Hymnal Editor, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator

The Reverend Doctor Melancthon Woolsey Stryker, sometimes listed in life as M. Woolsey Stryker, comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Hymnal (1941), of the old Evangelical and Reformed Church.

Our saint was a child of Alida Livingston Woolsey Stryker and the Reverend Isaac Pierson Stryker (b. 1815), a Presbyterian minister in Vernon, New York (1847-1852).  The newest Stryker, born in Vernon, New York, on January 7, 1851, imbibed deeply of faith and intellect.  Our saint graduated from Hamilton College, Clinton, New York (founded by a Presbyterian minister in 1793), in 1872.  Four years later, Stryker graduated from Auburn Theological Seminary and became a Presbyterian minister.

Stryker married Clara Elizabeth Goss (1856-1936) of Auburn, New York, on September 27, 1876.  The couple had six children:

  1. Goss Livingston Stryker (1877-1971),
  2. Alida Stryker Root (1881-1951),
  3. Robert McBurney Stryker (1883-1955),
  4. Lloyd Paul Stryker (1885-1955),
  5. Evelyn Stryker (1888-1976), and
  6. Elizabeth Woolsey Stryker (b. 1896).

Stryker ministered in Congregations from 1876 to 1892.  He started at Calvary Presbyterian Church, Auburn, New York (1876-1878).  Next, our saint served at a Presbyterian church in Ithaca, New York (1878-1883).  A brief tenure (1883-1885) at Second Congregational Church, Holyoke, Massachusetts, followed.  Then Stryker was the pastor of Fourth Presbyterian Church, Chicago, Illinois (1885-1892).

Above:  Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, 1913

Image Source = Library of Congress

Copyright Claimaint = Haines Photo Company

Stryker served as the President of Hamilton College from 1892 to 1917.  He, relatively liberal, by the standards of his era, staunchly defended classical education, firmly opposed anti-Semitism, spared no words in condemning corruption in public offices, and stood with the organized labor movement.  Yet Stryker was, according to some of his own words, uttered in public and committed to printing presses, racist, xenophobic, Nativistic, and ethnocentric.  (I read some primary sources at archive.org.)  He was simultaneously of his time and ahead of it.

Stryker, in the context of the unfolding troubles facing fellow Presbyterian minister and academic Charles Augustus Briggs (1841-1913), understood that denominational politics could threaten the academic integrity of a college.  Therefore, our saint, upon becoming the President of Hamilton College, immediately asserted the independence of that institution from ecclesiastical control.  Briggs, marginalized within the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., eventually found safe harbor in The Episcopal Church.  However, Stryker remained within the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A..  He, unlike Briggs, lived long enough to witness the Modernist faction triumph in the Modernist-Fundamentalist controversy in that denomination.

Stryker was a student of hymnody, as well as a writer and translator of hymns.  He translated the Dies Irae and wrote an analysis of the text.  Our saint’s translation of Martin Luther‘s great hymn, Ein Feste Burg, as “A Tower of Safety is Our God,” has fallen into obscurity.  An original hymn, “Almighty Lord, with One Accord” (1896), became a commencement hymn at many Christian colleges.  Stryker also produced or helped to produce the following volumes related to hymnody:

  1. The Alleluia:  A Collection of Hymns and Tunes for the Church School, and the Mid-Week Meeting (1880), as co-editor;
  2. The Church Praise Book:  A Selection of Hymns and Tunes for Christian Worship (1881), as co-editor;
  3. Christian Chorals for the Chapel and Fireside (1885), as editor;
  4. The New Alleluia:  A Collection of Hymns and Tunes for the Church School, and the Mid-Week Meeting (1886), as co-editor;
  5. The Song of Miriam and Other Hymns and Verses, Translated and Original (1888);
  6. Church Song:  For the Uses of The House of God (1889), as editor;
  7. Lattermath:  Hymns and Verses, Translated and Original (1896);
  8. The College Hymnal (1897, 1904), as editor;
  9. The Psalms of Israel in Rhymed English Metre (1915); and
  10. Christian Praise (1923), as editor.

Hymnary.org lists 80 hymn texts, translated and original, for Stryker.  Some of these titles are duplicates, but the volume of his output remains impressive.

Other published works of Stryker included volumes of history, speeches, sermons, and poetry, as well as a college textbook about the English Bible.  These works included the following:

  1. Historical Sketch of the Missions in Mexico Under the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church (1881);
  2. Hamilton, Lincoln, and Other Addresses (1896);
  3. The Well by the Gate (1903);
  4. Baccalaureate Sermons:  President M. Woolsey Stryker to the Graduating Classes of Hamilton College, 1893-1905 (1905);
  5. An Outline Study of the History of the Bible in English, with a Brief Essay Upon Its Quality as Literature (1914);
  6. Abraham Lincoln (1917);
  7. Faculae Annorum (1917);
  8. Vesper Bells (1919);
  9. Lincoln’s Land and Other Recent Verses (1921); and
  10. Ethics in Outline (1923).

Stryker, who received honorary degrees, retired from the presidency of Hamilton College in 1917.  He remained in Clinton, New York, where he died on December 6, 1929.  Our saint was 78 years old.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 1, 2021 COMMON ERA

PROPER 13:  THE TENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, YEAR B

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOSEPH OF ARIMATHEA, DISCIPLE OF JESUS

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Melancthon Woolsey Stryker)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Feast of George Hugh Bourne (December 1)   3 comments

Above:  Salisbury Cathedral from the Meadows, by John Constable

Image in the Public Domain

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GEORGE HUGH BOURNE (NOVEMBER 8, 1840-DECEMBER 1, 1925)

Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator

George Hugh Bourne comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Hymnal (1941), of the old Evangelical and Reformed Church.

Bourne was a priest in The Church of England and the son of an Anglican priest.  The father was R. B. Bourne, serving at St. Paul’s Cray, London, England, on November 8, 1840, when our saint debuted.  G. B. Bourne grew up with at least one sibling, Elizabeth.  Our saint studied at Eton then at Christ Church College, Oxford (B.A., 1863; B.C.L., 1866; D.C.L., 1871).  He, ordained to the diaconate in 1863, joined the ranks of priests the following year.

Bourne served as the Curate of Sandford-on-Thames from 1863 to 1865.  During this time, he translated Pange lingua gloriosi corporis from Latin into English as “Of the Wondrous Body, O My Tongue Be Telling.”  This translated hymn was one of the texts in Lyra Eucharistica, Second Edition (1864).

Bourne served at St. Andrew’s College, Chardstock, starting in 1866.  He was the headmaster (1866f) then the warden (1874f).  Sometime during our saint’s tenure, St. Andrew’s College transferred to St. Edmund’s College, Salisbury.  In 1867, Bourne composed a hymn, “O Christ, the King of Human Life,” for the wedding of his sister, Elizabeth, to Allan Webb (1839-1907), soon to become the Anglican Bishop of Bloemfontein, South Africa.  Also, in 1874, our saint contributed at least two texts to Seven Post-Communion Hymns (1874), for use in the chapel at St. Edmund’s College, Salisbury.  One text was “O Christ Our God, Who With Thine Own Hast been.”  However, “Lord, Enthroned in Heavenly Splendor,” usually sung to BRYN CALFARIA, has become a hit.

I know Bourne’s name because of “Lord, Enthroned in Heavenly Splendor.”  Perhaps you do, too, O reader.  This is our saint’s most popular hymn, ranked by inclusion in hymnals, over time.  This is a text that that made its U.S. debut in The Hymnal (1941), of the old Evangelical and Reformed Church.

Bourne served faithfully in a succession of positions.  He was the chaplain to this brother-in-law, Allan Webb, from 1879 to 1898.  Webb was the Bishop of Bloemfontein (1870-1883) then the Bishop of Grahamstown (1883-1898), in South Africa.  He retired in 1898.  From 1901 to 1907, Webb served as the Dean of Salisbury, England.  Bourne doubled as sub-deacon at the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Salisbury Cathedral) from 1887 to 1901.  Starting in 1901, our saint served as the cathedral’s treasurer and a prebendary there.  (“Prebendary” was an honorary title.  A prebendary held a prebend, an endowment in land or a pension, given to a cathedral for the support of a secular priest or a regular canon.)

Bourne, aged 85 years, died in Salisbury on December 1, 1925.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 29, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS MARY, MARTHA, AND LAZARUS OF BETHANY, FRIENDS OF JESUS

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

George Hugh Bourne and others, who have composed and translated hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Lucy Menzies (November 24)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Flag of Scotland

Image in the Public Domain

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LUCY MENZIES (1882-1954)

Scottish Presbyterian then Anglican Scholar and Mystic

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All mystics from whatever century or country have a conviction of the supreme value of their inner experience of God.  Vision and love are one act in which all blessedness is found.  They find all natural lovely things moving towards the expression of the inexpressible.

–Lucy Menzies, in the introduction to The Revelations or The Flowing Light of the Godhead (1953)

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Lucy Menzies comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Scottish Episcopal Church.  Her feast day in that denomination is November 24.

Lucy Menzies was a daughter of Allan Menzies (1845-1916) and Mary Elizabeth Honey Menzies (d. 1916), both Presbyterians.  Allan, a minister, translated philosophical and theological books from German.  He married Mary Elizabeth, a minister’s daughter, in 1878.  Iona, the Holy Isle, was one of the Menzies family’s favorite vacation spots.  Allan, from 1889 the Professor of Biblical Criticism at St Andrews University, sent his daughters, May and Lucy, to finishing school in Heidelberg, Germany, in 1897.

Lucy became a scholar, predictably.  She made her publishing debut with General Foch at the Marne (1918), translated from French.  Subsequent original works included St. Columba of Iona (1920), A Book of Saints for the Young (1923), The Saints of Italy (1924), and Mirrors of the Holy (1928).  A translation of Abbé de Turville’s Letters of Direction on the Spiritual Life followed in 1939.  Lucy, a longtime friend of Evelyn Underhill (1875-1941), had a hand in The Letters of Evelyn Underhill (1943), edited by Charles Williams (1886-1945).  Lucy’s last completed work was The Revelations or The Flowing Light of the Godhead, Translated from the Manuscript in the Library of the Monastery of Einsiedeln (1953).  This was a translation of writings of Mechthild of Magdeburg (1210?-1282/1285).

Lucy, confirmed into The Church of England in 1924, grew deeper in her faith by the help of Underhill, her de facto spiritual director.  Both women conducted spiritual retreats together, starting in the late 1920s.  Lucy served as the warden of the retreat house at Pleshey, Essex (1928-1938).  By 1938, our saint’s health and eyesight were failing, so she left Pleshey.

Above:  All Saints’ Church, St Andrews, Scotland

Image Source = Google Earth

Lucy returned to St Andrews and lived across from All Saints’ Church, where she worshiped.  She, awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree by the University of St Andrews in June 1954, died later that year, before completing her biography of Underhill.

Lucy Menzies loved God with all her heart, soul, and mind.  She devoted her intellect to the glorification of God.  And our saint grew into a mystical expression of Christian faith generally alien to the Reformed tradition and much more at home within Anglicanism and Roman Catholicism.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 27, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF GEORGE WASHINGTON DOANE, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF NEW JERSEY; AND HIS SON, WILLIAM CROSWELL DOANE, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF ALBANY; HYMN WRITERS

THE FEAST OF SAINTS ANTONY AND THEODOSIUS OF KIEV, FOUNDERS OF RUSSIAN ORTHODOX MONASTICISM; SAINT BARLAAM OF KIEV, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX ABBOT; AND SAINT STEPHEN OF KIEV, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX ABBOT AND BISHOP

THE FEAST OF CHRISTINA ROSSETTI, ANGLICAN POET AND RELIGIOUS WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINTS REMACLUS OF MAASTRICHT, THEODORE OF MAASTRICT, LAMBERT OF MAASTRICHT, HUBERT OF MAASTRICHT AND LIEGE, AND FLORIBERT OF LIEGE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT LANDRADA OF MUNSTERBILSEN, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBESS; AND SAINTS OTGER OF UTRECHT, PLECHELM OF GUELDERLAND, AND WIRO, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARIES

THE FEAST OF SAINT ZITA OF TUSCANY, WORKER OF CHARITY

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O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Lucy Menzies and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

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Feast of Arthur Henry Mann (November 17)   Leave a comment

Above:  Arthur Henry Mann

Image in the Public Domain

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ARTHUR HENRY MANN (MAY 16, 1850-NOVEMBER 19, 1929)

Anglican Organist and Hymn Tune Composer

Arthur Henry Mann comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).  This post relies primarily on various hymnal companion volumes.

Mann, born in Norwich, England, on May 16, 1850, became a superb musician.  He, a boy chorister and an organist at the Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Norwich, was a prodigy.  Our saint, when eight years old, could play the full cathedral service on the organ.  After Mann’s voice changed, he ceased to be a chorister.  He remained an organist, though.  The graduate of New College, Oxford (B.Mus., 1874; D.Mus., 1882) served as organist at the following:

  1. St. Peter’s Church, Wolverhampton (1870-1871);
  2. St. Michael and All Angels’ Church, Tettenhall, Wolverhampton (1871-1875);
  3. Beverley Minster, Beverley (1875-1876);
  4. King’s College, Cambridge (1876-1910); and
  5. Cambridge University (1897f).

Mann, a choir director, as well as the music master of Ley’s School, Cambridge University, applied his musical talents in other ways, too.  Our saint, from 1871 a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists, was the music editor of The Church of England Hymnal (1895).  Mann, a musicologist, collected early hymnals and was an expert on the music of George Frederick Handel (1685-1759).  Our saint put Handel’s manuscripts in order.  Mann also edited an edition of Spem in Alium, by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585).

Mann was also a composer.  He wrote music for voice and organ.  His most enduring compositions were probably hymn tunes, though.  These included the following:

  1. ANGEL’S STORY (frequently attached to “O Jesus, I Have Promised”),
  2. ARISTIDES,
  3. BENEDICTION,
  4. BERNO,
  5. CLAUDIUS,
  6. SILESIUS,
  7. THE NEW YEAR,
  8. VALOUR,
  9. WATERMOUTH, and
  10. WILTON.

Mann, aged 79 years, died in Cambridge, England, on November 19, 1929.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 26, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM COWPER, ANGLICAN HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT ADELARD OF CORBIE, FRANKISH ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK AND ABBOT; AND HIS PROTÉGÉ, SAINT PASCHASIUS RADBERTUS, FRANKISH ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK, ABBOT, AND THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF ROBERT HUNT, FIRST ANGLICAN CHAPLAIN AT JAMESTOWN, VIRGINIA

THE FEAST OF RUTH BYLLESBY, EPISCOPAL DEACONESS IN GEORGIA

THE FEAST OF SAINT STANISLAW KUBISTA, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR, 1940; AND SAINT WLADYSLAW GORAL, POLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP AND MARTYR, 1945

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring Arthur Henry Mann and all those

who with music have inspired us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior, who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 728

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Feast of St. Guido Maria Conforti (November 5)   Leave a comment

Above:  St. Guido Maria Conforti

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT GUIDO MARIA CONFORTI (MARCH 30, 1865-NOVEMBER 5, 1931)

Founder of the Xavierian Missionaries

St. Guido Maria Conforti comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Roman Catholic Church.

Conforti, born in Casalora di Ravadese, Parma, Italy, on March 30, 1865, came from a large and devout Roman Catholic family.  Rinaldo Conforti and Antonia Adorni Conforti had ten children; our saint was the eighth.  Conforti, as a Catholic elementary school boy, visited the parish church nearly every day, to converse with the crucified Jesus.  Our saint perceived his vocation, which entailed leaving the farm, against his father’s wishes.

Conforti matriculated at the seminary in Parma in November 1876.  Reading the works of St. Francis Xavier (1506-1552) inspired our saint to want to serve as a missionary.  Our saint applied unsuccessfully to join the Society of Jesus and the Society of Saint Francis de Sales.  The rector of the seminary was Blessed Andrea Carlo Ferrari (1850-1921), Conforti’s mentor.  Ferrari went on to serve as the Bishop of Guastilla (1890-1891), the Bishop of Como (1891-1894), and the Cardinal Archbishop of Milan (1894-1921).  Conforti, the Vice-Rector of the seminary under Ferrari, joined the ranks of priests on September 22, 1888, at Fontanellato.  He also taught at the seminary and, starting on March 7, 1896, served as the Vicar-General of the Diocese of Parma.

Conforti founded the Xavierian Missionaries on December 3, 1895.  Pope Leo XIII granted his approval in 1898.  The first Xavierian Missionaries arrived in China the following year.  Our saint served as the Archbishop of Ravenna from June 11, 1902, to November 1904.  After resigning from that post due to ill health, he became the Bishop Coadjutor of Parma and the Titular Archbishop of Stauropolis (1904-1907) then the Bishop of Parma (1907-1931).  He tended to his episcopal duties faithfully and traveled to China in 1928.  Our saint also influenced Maximum Illud (1919), Pope Benedict XV’s signal Apostolic Letter on foreign missions.

Conforti died in Parma on November 5, 1931.  He was 66 years old.

Holy Mother Church has formally recognized this saint.  Pope John Paul II declared Conforti a Venerable in 1992 the beatified him in 1996.  Pope Benedict XVI canonized our saint in 2011.

The Xavierian Missionaries continue their good work.  The website of the Xavierian Missionaries U.S.A. proclaims:

SHARING CHRIST ACROSS FAITHS AND CULTURES.

That ethos is consistent with the approach Conforti and Pope Benedict XV shared.  The Holy Father properly objected to mixing nationalism and Western ethnocentrism into missionary work, especially outside of the Western world.  He encouraged raising up local, indigenous people into leadership because the perception that Christianity and the Church were foreign and alien worked against successful evangelism.  The approach of Conforti and Pope Benedict XV was revolutionary at the time.  However, as time passed, it became mainstream.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 24, 2021 COMMON ERA

GENOCIDE REMEMBRANCE

THE FEAST OF SAINT EGBERT OF LINDISFARNE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK; AND SAINT ADALBERT OF EGMONT, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY

THE FEAST OF SAINT FIDELIS OF SIGMARINGEN, CAPUCHIN FRIAR AND MARTYR, 1622

THE FEAST OF JOHANN WALTER, “FIRST CANTOR OF THE LUTHERAN CHURCH”

THE FEAST OF SAINT MELLITUS, BISHOP OF LONDON, AND ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

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Almighty God, we praise you for the men and women you have sent

to call the Church to its tasks and renew its life

[such as your servant Saint Guido Maria Conforti].

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your Church and proclaim the reality of your kingdom;

through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

–Adapted from the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 37

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Feast of Blessed Maria Franciszka Siedliska (November 21)   Leave a comment

Above:  Blessed Maria Franciszka Siedliska

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED MARIA FRANCISZKA SIEDLISKA (NOVEMBER 12, 1842-NOVEMBER 21, 1902)

Foundress of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth

Born Franciszka Siedliska

Also known as Mother Mary of Jesus the Good Shepherd

Blessed Maria Franciszka Siedliska comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Roman Catholic Church.

Franciszka Siedliska was a Polish subject of the Russian Empire.  She, born in Roszkowa, Wola Castle, Roszkowa Wola, Poland, Russia, on November 12, 1842, was a daughter of Adolf Adam Siedliska and Cecylia Marianna Morawska.  The family was nominally Roman Catholic.  Our saint, like her parents, was indifferent to religion.

That changed when Siedliska was an adolescent.  Father Leander Lendzian, who prepared her for First Communion (May 1, 1855), sparked religious zeal within our saint.  Siedliska, who dedicated herself to God at her First Communion, decided by 1860 that she wanted to become a nun.  Her parents vigorously opposed this plan.  They prevented her from entering religious life until 1870.  Our saint moved with her parents to Switzerland in 1860, then to Prussia, then to France.  Siedliska and her family returned to their homeland in 1865.  Her father died in 1870.

Our saint finally had an opportunity to enter religious life in 1870, and she availed herself of it.  In 1870, she became a Franciscan tertiary in Lublin.  With the encouragement of Father Lendzian, Siedliska founded a new monastic order, in obedience to the will of God, as she understood it.  Pope Pius IX granted his permission in person on October 1, 1873.  Siedliska founded the Sisters of the the Holy Family of Nazareth at the start of Advent 1875, in Rome.

Our saint led the new order.  On May 1, 1884, she became a nun, as Mary of Jesus the Good Shepherd.  She spent the next years traveling across Europe and in the United States of America, founding schools and communities.  She did his until she, aged 60 years, died in Rome, on November 21, 1902.

Pope John Paul II declared our saint a Venerable in 1980 then beatified her nine years later.

The website of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth reads, in part:

We, the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, are called to extend the Kingdom of God’s love among ourselves and others by the living of the spirit of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, whose lives were centered in the love of God and one another.  We witness to this love through dedicated service to the Church, especially in ministry to the family.

That is a high calling.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 24, 2021 COMMON ERA

GENOCIDE REMEMBRANCE

THE FEAST OF SAINT EGBERT OF LINDISFARNE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK; AND SAINT ADALBERT OF EGMONT, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY

THE FEAST OF SAINT FIDELIS OF SIGMARINGEN, CAPUCHIN FRIAR AND MARTYR, 1622

THE FEAST OF JOHANN WALTER, “FIRST CANTOR OF THE LUTHERAN CHURCH”

THE FEAST OF SAINT MELLITUS, BISHOP OF LONDON, AND ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

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O God, whose blessed Son became poor that we through his poverty might be rich:

Deliver us from an inordinate love of this world, that we, inspired

by the devotion of your servant Blessed Maria Franciszka Siedliska,

may serve you with singleness of heart, and attain to the riches of the age to come;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Song of Songs 8:6-7

Psalm 34

Philippians 3:7-15

Luke 12:33-37 or Luke 9:57-62

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 722

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Feast of St. Ivan Kochurov (October 31)   Leave a comment

Above:  St. Ivan Kochurov, 1900

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT IVAN ALEXANDROVICH KOCHUROV

(JULY 17, 1871-OCTOBER 31, 1917, JULIAN CALENDAR)

(JULY 29, 1871-NOVEMBER 13, 1917, GREGORIAN CALENDAR)

Russian Orthodox Priest and Martyr, 1917

Alternative feast day = Sunday Nearest to January 25 (Feast of the New Martyrs and Confessors of Russia)

St. Ivan Alexandreivich Kochurov comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Orthodox Church in America.

St. Ivan Alexandreivich Kochurov, son of a priest (Alexander Kochurov), became a priest, too.  Our saint, born in Bigil’dino Surky, Ryazan Governate, Russian Empire, on July 13, 1871, studied at the Ryazin Seminary then at the Saint Petersburg Theological Academy.  He, graduating in 1895, became a deacon and married Alexandra Chernyshova.  Then, on August 27, 1895, he joined the ranks of priests.

Kochurov, who wanted to serve as a missionary priest in the United States of America, got his wish.  In 1895, he became the first permanent priest of St. Vladimir’s Church, Chicago, Illinois, founded in 1892.  Our saint supervised the construction of the building, started in 1902 and consecrated the following year.  St. Tikhon of Moscow (1865-1925), then the Bishop of the Aleutians and North America, consecrated the new structure.  Kochurov, who founded and helped to found other Russian Orthodox congregations in the Chicago area, as well as New York and Oklahoma.

St. Vladimir’s Church has become Holy Trinity Cathedral, of the Orthodox Church in America.

Above:  The “Fond du Lac Circus,” 1900

Image in the Public Domain

Kochurov is standing, third from the right.

Sts. Ivan and Tikhon participated in an innocuous and ecumenical matter that became a scandal in Evangelical Episcopalian circles.  Charles Chapman Grafton (1830-1912), the Episcopal Bishop of Fond du Lac (1889-1912), was an Anglo-Catholic interested in Old Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy.  He invited Bishops of the Polish National Catholic Church and the Russian Orthodox Church to join with other Episcopal bishops in consecrating Reginald Heber Weller (1857-1935) as the Bishop Coadjutor of Fond du Lac.  (Weller served as the Bishop of Fond du Lac from 1912 to 1933.)  The site of so many bishops in copes and mitres prompted many Evangelical Episcopalians to clutch their pearls and scream “dirty sassafras,”, so to speak.

Kochurov remained in the United States of America until 1907.  He and St. Alexis Toth (1854-1909) worked together to found a mutual aid society for recent Russian immigrants.  Kochurov also translated Russian religious texts into English.  Our saint, promoted to Archpriest in 1906, helped to organize the first Russian Orthodox All-American Council, Mayfield, Pennsylvania (1907).

Above:  The Flag of the Russian Empire

Image in the Public Domain

The Kochurov family returned to the Russian Empire in 1907.  He taught the catechism in schools in Narva, Estonia, until 1916.  Then our saint, transferred to Tsarskoe Selo, outside St. Petersburg) in 1916, preached at St. Catherine’s Cathedral.

On October 31, 1917 (Old Style)/November 13, 1917 (New Style), Bolsheviks arrested Kochurov, 46 years old.  They took him outside of Tsarskoe Selo and shot him, making him the first Russian Orthodox martyr under the Bolshevik rule.  His “crime” was being a priest.

The Russian Orthodox Church glorified (canonized) Kochurov in 1994.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 24, 2021 COMMON ERA

GENOCIDE REMEMBRANCE

THE FEAST OF SAINT EGBERT OF LINDISFARNE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK; AND SAINT ADALBERT OF EGMONT, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY

THE FEAST OF SAINT FIDELIS OF SIGMARINGEN, CAPUCHIN FRIAR AND MARTYR, 1622

THE FEAST OF JOHANN WALTER, “FIRST CANTOR OF THE LUTHERAN CHURCH”

THE FEAST OF SAINT MELLITUS, BISHOP OF LONDON, AND ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

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Almighty and everlasting God, who kindled the flame of your love

in the heart of your holy martyr Saint Ivan Kochurov:

Grant to us, your humble servants, a like faith and power of love,

that we who rejoice in his triumph may profit by his example;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with

you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 15:15-21

Psalm 124 or 31:1-5

1 Peter 4;12-19

Mark 8:34-38

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 715

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Feast of Eric Norelius (October 25)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Logo of the Augustana Synod

Image in the Public Domain

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ERIC NORELIUS (OCTOBER 26, 1833-MARCH 15, 1916)

Swedish-American Lutheran Minister

Eric Norelius comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Norelius grew up in The Church of Sweden.  He, born in Hassela, Sweden, on October 26, 1833, was steeped in Lutheranism.  When our saint arrived in New York Harbor on October 31, 1850, he found other Swedish immigrants, mostly Methodists.  When Norelius arrived in Chicago, Illinois, he found a Swedish Episcopalian congregation.  After graduating from Capital University, Columbus, Ohio (1855), Norelius began his Lutheran ministerial career.

In September 1855, Eric Norelius and Inga Peterson Norelius, newlyweds, arrived in Red Wing, Minnesota.  Our saint became the pastor of two churches, one in Red Wing and the other one in Vasa.  The Swedish Lutheran congregations were poor, so the Noreliuses had to leave, for financial reasons, in 1858.   Before they did, however, our saint had founded twelve congregations.

Norelius remained active in ecclesiastical affairs.  Our saint became a journalist.  He had founded a Swedish-language newspaper, the Minnesota Posten, in November 1857.  He assumed the editorship of the Hemlandet, a Swedish-language newspaper which absorbed the Minnesota Posten, in January 1859.  Norelius helped to found the Augustana Synod (originally for Norwegian and Swedish immigrants) in June 1860.  He served as a traveling missionary to Swedes living west of Minneapolis, starting in October 1860.

Norelius returned to the Red Wing-Vasa area, as pastor, in 1861.  He founded a school, the origin of Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota, in 1862.  Our saint also founded the Vasa Children’s Home in 1865.  This was the genesis of Lutheran Social Services  of Minnesota.

Norelius led above the parish level, too.  He served as the President of the Augustana Synod’s Minnesota Conference (1870f).  Then our saint was the President of the Augustana Synod (1874-1881, 1899-1911).  Norelius also wrote and edited.  His published works included The History of the Swedish Lutheran Congregations and the Swedish Americans (two volumes, 1890).  Norelius edited ecclesiastical publications (1870-1882, 1899-1909), too.

Norelius, aged 82 years, died in Vasa, Minnesota, on March 15, 1916.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 23, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF TOYOHIKO KAGAWA, RENEWER OF SOCIETY AND PROPHETIC WITNESS IN JAPAN

THE FEAST OF JAKOB BÖHME, GERMAN LUTHERAN MYSTIC

THE FEAST OF MARTIN RINCKART, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT TERESA MARIA OF THE CROSS, FOUNDRESS OF THE CARMELITE SISTERS OF SAINT TERESA OF FLORENCE

THE FEAST OF WALTER RUSSELL BOWIE, EPISCOPAL PRIEST, SEMINARY PROFESSOR, AND HYMN WRITER

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Almighty God, we praise you for the men and women you have sent

to call the Church to its tasks and renew its life [such as your servant Eric Norelius].

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your Church and proclaim

the reality of your kingdom;  through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

–Adapted from the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 37

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Feast of St. Elizabeth of the Trinity (November 8)   Leave a comment

Above:  St. Elizabeth of the Trinity

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT ÉLIZABETH CATEZ (JULY 18, 1880-NOVEMBER 9, 1906)

French Roman Catholic Nun, Mystic, and Religious Writer

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I am going to Light, to Love, to Life.

–The last words of St. Elizabeth of the Trinity

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St. Elizabeth of the Trinity comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Roman Catholic Church and The Episcopal Church.

The brief life of St. Élizabeth Catez epitomized spiritual growth and struggle.  Our saint, born on July 18, 1880, at the French military base at Avord, Cher, was the eldest child of Marie Rolland Catez and Captain Joseph Catez (d. October 2, 1887).  St. Elizabeth, baptized at the base’s chapel when she was four days old, moved with her family to Dijon after her father died.  Her upbringing was devout and Roman Catholic, full of milestones such as her first Confession, First Communion, and Confirmation.

Spiritual maturation transformed St. Elizabeth.  She gained control over her temper.  Our saint, a pianist and a chorister, also visited the sick and taught the catechism to children who worked in factories.  St. Elizabeth developed an interest in joining the Discaled Carmelite Order.  She rejected marriage proposals.  Marie (the mother) did not want St. Elizabeth to become a nun.  Yet our saint did, at Dijon, on August 2, 1901, at the age of 21 years.

St. Elizabeth sought a deeper understanding of the love of God through spiritual peaks and valleys.  She sensed God in mundane activities, such as washing clothes.  She found happiness, and wrote about mystical encounters with God.  By the end of her life, St. Elizabeth called herself Laudem Gloriae (Praise of Glory).  Looking forward to Heaven, our saint anticipated that she would bring souls out of themselves and encourage them to cling to God in simple love.

St. Elizabeth, 26 years old, died of Addison’s Disease on November 9, 1906.

Holy Mother Church recognized St. Elizabeth formally.  Pope John Paul II declared her a Venerable in 1982 then beatified her in 1984.  Pope Francis canonized our saint in 2016.

I refer you, O reader, to St. Elizabeth’s prayer to the Holy Trinity.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 22, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF GENE BRITTON, EPISCOPAL PRIEST

THE FEAST OF DONALD S. ARMENTROUT, U.S. LUTHERAN MINISTER AND SCHOLAR

THE FEAST OF HADEWIJCH OF BRABERT, ROMAN CATHOLIC MYSTIC

THE FEAST OF KATHE KOLLWITZ, GERMAN LUTHERAN ARTIST AND PACIFIST

THE FEAST OF SAINT VITALIS OF GAZA, MONK, HERMIT, AND MARTYR, CIRCA 625

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O God, whose blessed Son became poor that we through his poverty might be rich:

Deliver us from an inordinate love of this world, that we,

inspired by the devotion of your servant Saint Elizabeth of the Trinity,

may serve you with singleness of heart,

and attain to the riches of the age to come;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Song of Songs 8:6-7

Psalm 34

Philippians 3:7-15

Luke 12:33-37 or Luke 9:57-62

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 722

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