Archive for the ‘Saints of the 1850s’ Category

Feast of George Washington Doane and William Croswell Doane (April 27)   4 comments

Above:  The Flag of The Episcopal Church

Image in the Public Domain

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GEORGE WASHINGTON DOANE (MAY 27, 1799-APRIL 27, 1859)

Episcopal Bishop of New Jersey

father of

WILLIAM CROSWELL DOANE (MARCH 2, 1832-MAY 17, 1913)

Episcopal Bishop of Albany

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Above:  George Washington Doane 

Image in the Public Domain

George Washington Doane was a bishop.  He entered the world on May 27, 1799, at Trenton, New Jersey.  Bishop John Henry Hobart of New York ordained him deacon then priest in 1823.  Father Doane founded St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, New York, New York.  He also taught at Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut, from 1824 to 1828, and served Christ Episcopal Church, Boston, Massachusetts from 1828 to 1832, as Assistant Rector then Rector.  In 1832 Doane became Bishop of New Jersey, a position he held for the remainder of his life.  Much of his episcopal legacy rests on the founding of parochial schools.  Also, Doane was a High Churchman at a time when chanting, bowing to altars, and lighting candles could lead to major theological altercations.

Doane’s son, William Croswell Doane, became the Bishop of Albany, in the state of New York.

Bishop George Washington Doane wrote the hymns, “Thou Art the Way” and “Softly Now the Light of Day.

He died on April 27, 1859.

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Above:  William Croswell Doane

Image in the Public Domain

William Croswell Doane was also a bishop.  He entered the world on March 2, 1832, in Boston, Massachusetts.  His father, George Washington Doane, ordained Doane, Jr., to the diaconate in 1853 and the priesthood three years later.  In the 1850s and 1860s Doane, Jr., served churches in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut; Samuel Clemens, a.k.a. Mark Twain, was a parishioner in Hartford, Connecticut.  Doane Jr., like his father, was a High Churchman when that was controversial.  These ritualistic tendencies prompted evangelical (low church) opposition to his 1868 election as Bishop of the newly created Diocese of Albany, in the state of New York.  Bishop Doane of Albany oversaw the construction of the Cathedral of All Saints, Albany.  (J. P. Morgan contributed to the financing of the cathedral.)  Cathedrals were not commonplace in Episcopal dioceses at the time, unlike today.

William Croswell Doane died in office on May 17,  1913.

His main legacy for church members today is the hymn, “Ancient of Days.”

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 18, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF BARTHOLOME DE LAS CASAS, “APOSTLE TO THE INDIANS”

THE FEAST OF ARTHUR PENRHYN STANLEY, ANGLICAN DEAN OF WESTMINSTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDWARD WILLIAM LEINBACH, U.S. MORAVIAN MUSICIAN AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF ELIZABETH FERARD, FIRST DEACONESS IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND

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Almighty God, you have raised up faithful bishops of your church, including your servants

George Washington Doane and William Croswell Doane.

May the memory of their lives be a source of joy for us and a bulwark of our faith,

so that we may serve and confess your name before the world,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3;14-21

Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Feast of St. Conrad of Parzham (April 21)   Leave a comment

Above:  St. Conrad of Parzham

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT CONRAD OF PARZHAM (DECEMBER 22, 1818-APRIL 21, 1894)

Capuchin Friar

Born Johann Birndorfer

Johann Birdorfer was a holy man.  He, born in Parzham, Bavaria, on December 22, 1818, came from a farming family.  As a young man he devoted himself to solitary prayer and to peacemaking.  He also frequented churches and shrines in his native region.  Our saint became a Capuchin tertiary at the age of 31 years and a novice (as Conrad) two years later.  For more than forty years Friar Conrad, a porter at the Shrine of Our Lady at Alotting, Bavaria, distributed alms, assisted pilgrims, counseled people spiritually, and taught the faith to children.  He performed these duties until three days before he died.  During those final days, as St. Conrad lay on his death-bed, children to whom he had taught the rosary recited it outside his window.  He died on April 21, 1894.

Pope Pius XI declared St. Conrad a Venerable in 1928, a Blessed in 1930, and a full saint in 1934.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 12, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF DESIDERIUS ERASMUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF JOHN GUALBERT, FOUNDER OF THE VALLOMBROSAN BENEDICTINES

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES RENATUS VERBEEK, MORAVIAN MINISTER AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF PETER RICKSECKER, U.S. MORAVIAN MINISTER, MISSIONARY, MUSICIAN, MUSIC EDUCATOR, AND COMPOSER; STUDENT OF JOHANN CHRISTIAN BECHLER, MORAVIAN MINISTER, MUSICIAN, MUSIC EDUCATOR, AND COMPOSER; FATHER OF JULIUS THEODORE BECHLER, U.S. MORAVIAN MINISTER, MUSICIAN, EDUCATOR, AND COMPOSER

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O God, whose blessed Son became poor that we through his poverty might be rich:

Deliver us from an inordinate love of this world, that we, inspired by the devotion

of your servant Saint Conrad of Parzham, may serve you with singleness of heart,

and attain to the riches of the age to come;  through Jesus Christ our Lord,

who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Song of Songs 8:6-7

Psalm 34

Philippians 3:7-15

Luke 12:33-37 or Luke 9:57-62

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 22

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Feast of Blessed Maria Anna Blondin (April 18)   Leave a comment

Above:  Blessed Maria Anne Blondin

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED MARIA ANNE BLONDIN (APRIL 18, 1809-JANUARY 2, 1890)

Foundress of the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Anne

Born Esther Blondin

Alternative feast day = January 2

Blessed Maria Anne Blondin was a saint whom the Roman Catholic Church marginalized then recognized as holy.

Esther Blondin, born at Terrebonne, Quebec, on April 18, 1809, came from an illiterate farming family.  Our saint, a daughter of Jean-Baptiste Blondin and Maria Rose Limoges Blondin, worked as the domestic servant of a village merchant when she was young.  The Sisters of the Congregation of Notre Dame educated young Esther, who became a novice in the order yet had to abandon that plan, due to bad health.

Blondin became concerned about how best to reduce rates of illiteracy in her area.  In 1833 she began to teach at a parochial school in Vaudreuil.  Eventually our saint rose to lead that institution.  Blondin concluded that, in her geographical area, illiteracy was commonplace because only men could teach girls most effectively.  Therefore two parochial schools per parish were ideal.  However, some parishes were too poor to have even one parochial school, and many who could one did not have one.  Our saint founded the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Anne in 1850 for the purpose of teaching impoverished girls.

Blondin, unlike founders of many other religious orders, did not preside over her order for long.  She struggled with meddling by the chaplain, Father Louis Adolphe Marechal.  He lied about her, accusing our saint of financial mismanagement.  Marechal had Blondin demoted to Directress of the St. Genevieve Convent then recalled to the mother house in 1858.  At the mother house our saint endured many indignities.  She had to perform menial tasks.  Also, the sisters could not address her as “Mother,” for Marechal had imposed that rule.  Blondin endured all this for the good of the order and those it served.  She died of natural causes at Lachine, Quebec, on January 2, 1890.  She was 80 years old.

Eventually the Roman Catholic Church rehabilitated Blondin’s reputation.  Pope John Paul II declared her a Venerable in 1991 then a Blessed ten years later.

Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can never hurt me.

So says an inaccurate chant.  According to ancient Jewish mythology, God spoke the universe into existence.  As bad as killing someone is, assassinating one’s character can be at least as bad.  One might think of people falsely accused of a crime–perhaps even convicted in a court of law–but certainly convicted in the court of public opinion.  As bad as this has always been, it is worse in a digital age, due to the accessibility of news stories (even partial and discredited ones) via websites.  In this digital age, old and inaccurate stories haunt people more than in previous times.  The timeless commandment against not bearing false witness becomes more urgent than ever.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 11, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF NATHAN SODERBLOM, SWEDISH ECUMENIST AND ARCHBISHOP OF UPPSALA

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O God, by whose grace your servant Blessed Maria Anne Blondin,

kindled with the flame of your love, became a burning and a shining light in your Church:

Grant that we also may be aflame with the spirit of love and discipline,

and walk before you as children of light; through Jesus Christ our Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Unity of the Holy Spirit, now and for ever.  Amen.

Acts 2:42-47a

Psalm 133 or 34:1-8 or 119:161-168

2 Corinthians 6:1-10

Matthew 6:24-33

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 723

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Feast of Venerable Cornelia Connelly (April 18)   Leave a comment

Above:  Venerable Cornelia Connelly

Image in the Public Domain

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VENERABLE CORNELIA PEACOCK CONNELLY (JANUARY 15, 1809-APRIL 18, 1879)

Foundress of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus

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I belong all to God.

–Venerable Cornelia Connelly

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The spiritual pilgrimage of the Venerable Cornelia Connelly entailed learning to distinguish between the wishes of her husband and the call of God on her life.  Cornelia Peacock, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on January 15, 1809, grew up a Presbyterian.  In 1831 she married Pierce Connelly (1804-1883), an Episcopal priest.  In 1835 the Connellys converted to Roman Catholicism, for Pierce had become convinced that Holy Mother Church was the true church.  By 1839 husband and wife were teaching in rural church-operated schools in Louisiana.  Soon hardships visited the family.  Their fourth child, Mary Magdalene, died at the age of seven weeks in 1840.  Shortly thereafter, John Henry, their two-year-old son, died on February 2 (the Feast of the Presentation), of injuries he had suffered after a dog had pushed him into a vat of boiling cane juice.  Later in 1840, when Cornelia was pregnant with Adeline, her fifth child, Pierce announced that he had decided to study for the priesthood.  This started the process of breaking up the family, for he would have to take a vow of celibacy to become a Roman Catholic priest.

Cornelia eventually accepted her husband’s decree as being consistent with the will of God.  Certainly God worked through Pierce’s decree for the good of many, including Cornelia.  (She was better off without him.)  In 1843 Pierce was in Rome, studying under the guidance of Pope Gregory XVI.  Cornelia and the children joined him in the Eternal City and resided at the Sacred Heart Convent on Trinita de Monte.  Pierce visited once a week; the marriage was functionally over.  Soon the couple separated formally.  In 1845 Pierce became a priest and Cornelia took a vow of celibacy.  She built a new life in England, where Roman Catholicism, recently emancipated, was reviving and rebuilding.  In 1846 she began to work in the field of education of girls and assumed leadership of a new convent school at Derby.  The following year she founded and became the superior of the new Society of the Holy Child Jesus.  Our saint told the nuns:

As you step through the muddy streets, love God with your feet; and when your hands toil, love Him with your hands; and when you teach the little children, love Him in His little ones.

Pierce had a vindictive aspect to his character.  In 1848, when he arrived in England, Cornelia told him to leave.  He took three of their children out of the new order’s school without Cornelia’s permission, posed as the co-founder of the Society, and sued (in an Anglican court) for his conjugal rights.  (He was supposed to be a celibate priest, according to his vows.)  Eventually the court sided with Cornelia.  Then Pierce resigned from the Roman Catholic priesthood, turned against Holy Mother Church, took all but one child (a painter, who remained loyal to his mother) to the United States, and turned them against our saint.  Pierce spent the rest of his life defaming Cornelia’s character and writing and publishing anti-Roman Catholic tirades.

Cornelia, who suffered emotionally due to the alienation from most of her family and the published attacks of her character, served as the superior of the Society for more than three decades.  She oversaw the founding of schools in England, France, and the United States, and promoted the education of young women.  Physical suffering (in the form of eczema) marred her final few years.  Our saint died, aged 70 years, at St. Leonards-on-Sea, Sussex, on April 18, 1879.

Pope John Paul II declared Cornelia a Venerable in 1992.

The passage of time has rendered its verdict in favor of Cornelia, as opposed to Pierce.  She, as a nun, was married to Jesus, certainly a better husband.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 10, 2017 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JOHANN SCHEFFLER, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST, POET, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF GEORG NEUMARK, GERMAN LUTHERAN POET AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF JOHN HINES, PRESIDING BISHOP OF THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH

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O God, whose blessed Son became poor that we through his poverty might be rich:

Deliver us from an inordinate love of this world, that we,

inspired by the devotion of your servant Venerable Cornelia Connelly,

may serve you with singleness of heart, and attain to the riches of the age to come;

through Jesus Christ, our Lord, who lives and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Song of Songs 8:6-7

Psalm 34

Philippians 3:7-15

Luke 12:33-37 or Luke 9:57-62

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 722

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Feast of Daniel Sylvester Tuttle (April 17)   Leave a comment

Above:  Daniel Sylvester Tuttle

Image in the Public Domain

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DANIEL SYLVESTER TUTTLE (JANUARY 26, 1837-APRIL 17, 1923)

Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church

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We were most civilly and courteously treated in this call, but I was not asked to call again.  I did not detect any violation of grammar or of good sense or of good taste on his part during our call.  He is so powerful a man in everything here, and so unscrupulous a man, I fear, in most things, that my policy will be to have as little as possible to do with him.  With his keensightedness he must know, that if not in will yet in reality, by our services and our school, we are putting our clutches to his very throat.

–Bishop Tuttle, writing to his wife, after meeting Brigham Young, July 10, 1867

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Daniel Sylvester Tuttle was a bishop for nearly 56 of his 86 years–about 65 percent of his lifetime.

Tuttle, who studied to become a teacher, joined the ranks of Episcopal priests.  He, born at Windham, New York, on January 26, 1837, graduated from Columbia University, New York, New York, in 1857.  He taught at the Columbia College Grammar School and worked as a private tutor in New York City before matriculating at the General Theological Seminary, from which he graduated in 1862.  Our saint, ordained a deacon in 1862 and a priest the following year, served at just one congregation–Zion Church, Morris, New York–first as the Curate then as the Rector.  He married Harriet Minerva Foote (1841-1899) in 1865.  The couple had children.

In late 1866 the House of Bishops elected the 29-year-old Tuttle the Missionary Bishop of Montana, with responsibilities also in Utah and Idaho.  On May 1, 1867, at the age of 30 years (the minimum age for an Episcopal bishop) he commenced his episcopate.  Our saint proceeded to establish Episcopal churches and other institutions–including St. Mark’s Cathedral (the first non-Mormon church in Utah), St. Mark’s School, and St. Mark’s Hospital in Salt Lake City–on the frontier.  Life for Tuttle and his family in the West was primitive, certainly compared to conditions in New York City.  In 1880 his title changed to Missionary Bishop of Utah and Idaho; Montana became the responsibility of another bishop.  Tuttle, who, after meeting Brigham Young, considered the Mormon leader “unscrupulous” and someone to avoid, built up The Episcopal Church in his jurisdiction in such a way as to win the respect of many Mormons.  An official Latter-day Saints source called the bishop “a consistent adversary.”  His task, as he understood it, was to build up The Episcopal Church, not to tear down the Mormon Church:

My plan for dealing with Mormonism, and for putting down Mormonism, immoral as it is, infidel as it is, heathenish as it is, in God’s own time, is by preaching the full truth of the everlasting Gospel, as contained in the Holy Bible and embodied in the Church, and by striving constantly, with His help, to do unto others as I would that others should do unto me.

Tuttle translated to the Diocese of Missouri in 1886.  There he remained for the rest of his life.  During his tenure the diocese, out of necessity, divided, giving birth to the Diocese of West Missouri  in 1890.  Our saint was a busy man, for he doubled as the acting Missionary Bishop of Salt Lake (with responsibilities in Utah and parts of Nevada and Wyoming) from late 1903 to late 1904 and as the Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church from 1903 to 1923.  He was the last man to serve as the Presiding Bishop on the basis of seniority; the General Convention changed the system in 1919.

Tuttle died in St. Louis, Missouri, on April 17, 1923.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 4, 2017 COMMON ERA

INDEPENDENCE DAY (U.S.A.)

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Heavenly Father, Shepherd of your people, we thank you for your servant Daniel Sylvester Tuttle,

who was faithful in the care and nurture of your flock;

and we pray that, following his example and the teaching of his holy life,

we may by your grace grow into the stature of the fullness of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16

Psalm 23

1 Peter 5:1-4

John 21:15-17

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 718

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Feast of Emily Cooper (April 17)   Leave a comment

Above:  Flag of the Commonwealth of Kentucky

Image in the Public Domain

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EMILY COOPER (1839-APRIL 17, 1909)

Episcopal Deaconess

The Episcopal Church added the commemoration of the life of Emily Cooper to the calendar of saints in 2015.

Discussions regarding the establishment of the female diaconate in The Episcopal Church began in 1868 and terminated with the approval of the germane canon at the General Convention in 1889.  Prior to 1889, however, some women had already become deaconesses.  One of the earliest Episcopal deaconesses was our saint, part of a group of four women who became deaconesses during a ceremony at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, Brooklyn, New York, in June 1873, after two years of preparation.

Cooper, a 44-year-old widow in 1873, returned to her native Kentucky to serve as a deaconess.  In 1880 she became the director of the new Home of the Innocents, Louisville, a diocesan home for cast-off children–the abused, the sick, the dying, and the abandoned.  For about 24 years our saint led her staff in this good work.  Some of the abandoned children lacked even names; she named them.  Cooper also assisted at the baptisms of 244 children.  Our saint retired in 1904.  She spent her final years at the Orphanage of the Good Shepherd.  She died, aged about 70 years, on April 17, 1909.

The Home of the Innocents continues to operate as it expands its facilities and services.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 4, 2017 COMMON ERA

INDEPENDENCE DAY (U.S.A.)

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God of the holy innocents, we thank you for the motherly witness of your deaconess

Emily Cooper, who, in naming and baptizing did not forget the children:

Draw our hearts and minds also to the plight of little ones,

always remembering your Son’s teaching that in receiving a little child in his name,

we receive Christ himself, who lives and reigns with you

and the Spirit, as one, caring for ever and ever.  Amen.

Zechariah 8:3-12, 16-17

Psalm 146 or 22:22-27

1 Peter 4:7-11

Mark 10:42-52

A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  A Calendar of Commemorations (2016)

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Feast of Lucy Larcom (April 16)   1 comment

Above:  Lucy Larcom

Image in the Public Domain

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LUCY LARCOM (MARCH 5, 1826-APRIL 17, 1893)

U.S. Academic, Journalist, Poet, Editor, and Hymn Writer

Lucy Larcom came to my attention when I found her name in a hymnal.

Larcom was a woman ahead of her time, for she was a pioneering academic.

Larcom, born at Beverly, Massachusetts, on March 5, 1826.  Her father, a sea-captain, died when she was a juvenile.  Therefore she had to leave her school in 1837 and go to work at the Lowell Mills, Lowell, Massachusetts, until 1845.  She also took classes at Lowell.  During her final two years at Lowell Larcom contributed to the Lowell Offering, the first magazine in the United States edited exclusively by women.  Our saint taught at a rural school in Looking Glass, Illinois, from 1846 to 1849.  Then, for three years, the studied at Monticello Female Seminary, graduating in 1852.

Larcom chose professional life over marriage.   She did have a romance, but she kept the details private.  From 1854 to 1863 our saint taught English literature and composition, history, logic, botany, and moral philosophy at Wheaton Female Seminary, Norton, Massachusetts.  In 1855 she founded The Rushlight, the college’s literary magazine.  Larcom reduced her teaching schedule, due to health issues, and returned to the college in 1865-1867 then at other times as a visiting lecturer.  Larcom contributed prose and poetry to various publications.  She also edited Our Young Folks (as Assistant Editor from 1865 to 1866 and as Editor-in-Chief from 1866 to 1873).  She also published works of prose and poetry in book form.  From some of these volumes came hymns.

Larcom, who grew up a Congregationalist, spent much of her life as a Christian not affiliated formally with any church.  She attended Trinity Episcopal Church, Boston, Massachusetts, throughout the 1880s, finally accepting confirmation in 1890.  Larcom had to work through her Puritan upbringing and her complicated relationship to organized religion.  Anglican influences on her changing religious opinions included Frederick Denison Maurice (1805-1872) and Phillips Brooks (1835-1893).

Larcom died, aged 67 years, at Boston, on April 17, 1893.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 4, 2017 COMMON ERA

INDEPENDENCE DAY (U.S.A.)

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O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Lucy Larcom and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

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