Archive for the ‘Saints of the 1940s’ Category

Feast of Arthur Carl Lichtenberger (September 3)   2 comments

Above:  The Flag of The Episcopal Church

Photographer = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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ARTHUR CARL LICHTENBERGER (JANUARY 8, 1900-SEPTEMBER 3, 1968)

Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church and Witness for Civil Rights

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Fast from criticism, and feast on praise.

Fast from self-pity, and feast on joy.

Fast from ill-temper and feast on peace.

Fast from resentment, and feast on contentment.

Fast from jealousy, and feast on love.

Fast from pride, and feast on humility.

Fast from selfishness, and feast on service.

Fast from fear, and feast on faith.

–Arthur Carl Lichtenberger on Lenten practice

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Arthur Carl Lichtenberger was a leader of The Episcopal Church during a transitional period of its life.  His influence has been evident since his term as Presiding Bishop.

Lichtenberger was a theologian and a scholar.  He, born in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, on January 8, 1900, was a child of Adam Lichtenberger and Thereza Heitz.  He graduated from Kenyon College with a Bachelor of Philosophy degree in 1923.  Two years later he graduated from the Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Massachusetts.  Our saint, ordained a deacon in 1925 and a priest the following year, was Professor of New Testament at St. Paul’s Divinity School, Wuchang, China, from 1925 to 1927.  Graduate work at Harvard University followed in 1927-1928.  Next our saint was the Rector of Grace Church, Cincinnati, Ohio (1928-1933).  While the Rector of St. Paul’s Church, Brookline, Massachusetts (1933-1941), Lichtenberger was also a lecturer at the Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge (1935-1941).  Our saint went on to serve as the Dean of Trinity Cathedral, Newark, New Jersey (1941-1948), then as Professor Pastoral Theology at the General Theological Seminary, New York City (1948-1951).  Throughout his career Lichtenberger received numerous Doctor of Divinity, Doctor of Sacred Theology, Doctor of Laws, Doctor of Civil Law, and Doctor of Humane Letters degrees.

Lichtenberger joined the ranks of bishops in 1951.  That year he became the Bishop Coadjutor of Missouri.  The following year he succeeded to become the Bishop of Missouri.  While in the Diocese of Missouri Lichtenberger wrote the exposition on the Book of Esther for Volume III (1954) of The Interpreter’s Bible.  He also initiated congregational-level study of church mission, resulting in an increase in the amount of outreach and the number of churches.

Above:  A Portion of The Interpreter’s Bible, Volume III (1954), x

Scanned by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

At the General Convention of 1958 Lichtenberger won the election for Presiding Bishop, to succeed Henry Knox Sherrill (1890-1980), who had served in that post since 1947.  On that occasion Lichtenberger affirmed those unalienable rights no government, person, or group has a moral right to deny anyone.  He said that the human rights

to vote, to eat a hamburger where you want, to have a decent job, to live in a house fit for habitation are not rights to be litigated or negotiated.

(Those are still disputed points in the United States of America in 2018, unfortunately.)  Our saint led The Episcopal Church in affirming civil rights.  On his watch the House of Bishops supported the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom (August 1963) and what became the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  In June 1964, after Congress passed that landmark law, Lichtenberger issued a public statement in which he acknowledged that

legislation cannot change attitudes,

but

…law does influence the way in which men and women treat one another, and more than just relationships do provide a social climate in which attitudes change….We must commit ourselves without reservation to the full support of civil rights.

Baptism, Lichtenberger argued, creates a new social order.  This understanding, which influenced his views on the imperative of civil rights protections, has become part of the Baptismal Covenant in The Book of Common Prayer (1979).

Speaking of liturgical revision, Lichtenberger supported it.  At the General Conventions of 1961 and 1964 he favored the authorization of “trial use” liturgies.  The process of revising The Book of Common Prayer (1928) was underway when he died in 1968.

Lichtenberger became the Presiding Bishop when the denominational headquarters were inadequate.  The Church had occupied 281 Fourth Avenue, Manhattan, New York City, since 1894.  By 1958 branch offices in Connecticut, Chicago, and elsewhere in New York City were necessary.  Since 1960 the headquarters of The Episcopal Church have been at 815 Second Avenue, Manhattan.

On the ecumenical front Lichtenberger made history.  In 1961, en route to the Third Assembly of the World Council of Churches, our saint visited Pope St. John XXIII, thereby becoming the first Episcopal Presiding Bishop to visit a pope.

Lichtenberger was unable to complete a full term as Presiding Bishop.  As Parkinson’s Disease took its toll, our saint realized that he had to resign.  So, at the General Convention of 1964, the House of Bishops elected John Hines (1910-1997) to lead the denomination.  On his way out of office Lichtenberger published The Day is at Hand (1964), a collection of some of his writings.  From 1965 to 1968 our saint was Professor of Pastoral Theology at the Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Lichtenberger, aged 68 years, died in Bethel, Vermont, on September 3, 1968.

Virginia Theological Seminary, Alexandria, Virginia, has as one of its endowed chairs the Arthur Carl Lichtenberger Chair in Pastoral Theology and Continuing Education.

I revere John Hines, who deserves many accolades was still stands as a controversial and prophetic figure in 2018.  History should give him his due.  Yet I notice that his legacy overshadows that of Lichtenberger, a man no less supportive of civil rights and liturgical revision.  It is past time that Lichtenberger receive his due, which need not come at the expense of Hines.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 19, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JOHN HINES, PRESIDING BISHOP OF THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH AND WITNESS FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN PLESSINGTON, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR

THE FEAST OF SAINT JÓZEF PUCHALA, POLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC FRANCISCAN FRIAR, PRIEST, AND MARTYR

THE FEAST OF SAINT POEMEN, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINTS JOHN THE DWARF AND ARSENIUS THE GREAT, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONKS

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Almighty God, we praise you for your servant Arthur Carl Lichtenberger,

through whom you have called the church to its tasks and renewed its life.

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your church and power in the reality of your reign,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 60

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Feast of James Bolan Lawrence (September 3)   Leave a comment

Above:  Calvary Episcopal Church, Americus, Georgia

Scanned from a Business Card

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JAMES BOLAN LAWRENCE (JANUARY 2, 1878-JULY 28, 1947)

Episcopal Priest and Missionary in Southwestern Georgia, U.S.A.

Also known as Brother Jimmy Lawrence

“The Bishop of Buckwheat”

In The Episcopal Church the commemoration of saints has become complicated during the last decade or so.  Editions of The Book of Common Prayer have, since the first one in 1549, included major feasts, the number of which has increased as Prayer Book revision has taken place from time to time.  The first edition of Lesser Feasts and Fasts debuted in 1963 as the calendar expanded.  Subsequent editions of Lesser Feasts and Fasts (through 2006) have become thicker as the General Convention as added more saints.  The most recent General Convention approved Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, with more saints than Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2006Lesser Feasts and Fasts has remained the official denominational calendar of commemorations despite the even more expanded calendar defined first by Holy Women, Holy Men (2010) then by A Great Cloud of Witnesses (2016).  Many dioceses have long observed their local saints also.  Some of these local commemorations have filtered up to the denominational level.  The Diocese of Georgia has, since 1999, recognized James Bolan Lawrence as a saint, with September 3 as his feast day.  His feast has remained particular to the Diocese of Georgia, except, as far as I know, at this, my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.

James Bolan Lawrence was a dedicated missionary.  He born, in Marietta, Georgia, on January 2, 1878, was the fifth of six children of Robert de Treville Lawrence (b. 1841) and Anna E. Atkinson.  Lawrence, baptized in St. James Episcopal Church, Marietta, Georgia (then in the Diocese of Georgia; in the Diocese of Atlanta since 1907), graduated from General Theological Seminary, New York City.  He, a bachelor, collected silver cups, entertained at home, was a wonderful conversationalist, and maintained a rigorous schedule as he ministered to his parish and missions.

For 42 years (1905-1947) Lawrence served as the Rector of Calvary Episcopal Church, Americus, Georgia.  Most of those years he was also the Archdeacon of Albany; in that capacity he had administrative authority over missions.  As the Rector of Calvary Church Lawrence oversaw construction (completed in 1921) of the new building, designed by Ralph Adams Cram (1863-1942), the architect who designed the Cathedral of St John the Divine, New York City.  Lawrence also founded the following rural congregations:

  1. Holy Trinity Church, Blakely;
  2. Epiphany Church, Cuthbert;
  3. St. James Church, Pennington;
  4. Calvary Church, Dawson; and
  5. the unorganized mission at Benevolence.

Lawrence also served at Prince of Peace Church, Vienna; and Christ Church, Cordele.

Above:  Locations of Churches Lawrence Served

Map Source = Hammond’s Complete World Atlas (1951), 171

If that were not enough, Lawrence did more.  In 1929 he became a trustee of the Fort Valley High and Industrial School, an institution of The Episcopal Church.  (Now it is Fort Valley State University, a public institution.)  And, in 1934-1935, Lawrence was a candidate for Bishop Coadjutor of Georgia.  Middleton Stuart Barnwell (1884-1957) won that election and succeeded to the post of Bishop of Georgia in 1936.  He served until 1954.

Lawrence, the rector of one parish and the vicar of several missions, began to anticipate his retirement in the 1940s.  His intention was to retire to Pennington and spend his final years as the Vicar of St. James Church.  None of that happened, though.  He suffered his first heart attack in December 1945, when he was 67 years old.  Lawrence eventually resumed priestly duties, but had a second heart attack on Sunday, May 25, 1947.  He died on St. Simon’s Island on July 28, 1947.  Lawrence was 69 years old.  He could not spend retirement as the Vicar of St. James Church, Pennington, but he found his final resting place there.  Other priests continued the work he had begun and continued.

Time has marched on.  Of the churches Lawrence founded, only Holy Trinity, Blakely, has survived.  (I have visited there.  The buildings have long been near the courthouse square.)  Calvary Church, Dawson, closed; Holy Spirit Church, Dawson, succeeded it.  Calvary Church, Americus, suffered a schism in 2012; the congregation has struggled since then.  If that were not enough, the physical structure has become endangered, in the name of economic progress.

Yet I have discerned reasons for optimism.  Christ Church, Cordele, was struggling when I was a member there, in 1998-2001.  I recall vocalized questions about whether the congregation would continue to exist.  The church, long a perpetual mission, except for a few years in the 1970s, when it was a parish, has been thriving again for some years now.

I predict that the best years of Calvary Episcopal Church, Americus, await it.

May the legacy of James Bolan Lawrence and the call of the Great Commission continue to inspire people–especially in The Episcopal Church–in southwestern Georgia.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 18, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF BARTHOLOMÉ DE LAS CASAS, “APOSTLE TO THE INDIANS”

THE FEAST OF ARTHUR PENRHYN STANLEY, ANGLICAN DEAN OF WESTMINSTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDWARD WILLIAM LEINBACH, U.S. MORAVIAN MUSICIAN AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF ELIZABETH FERARD, FIRST DEACONESS IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND

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Almighty and everlasting God, we thank you for your servant James Bolan Lawrence,

whom you called to preach the Gospel to the people of southwestern Georgia.

Raise up in this and very land evangelists and heralds of your kingdom,

that your Church may proclaim the unsearchable riches of our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Isaiah 52:7-10

Psalm 96 or 96:1-7

Acts 1:1-9

Luke 10:1-9

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 716

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Feast of the Martyrs of New Guinea, 1942 and 1943 (September 2)   Leave a comment

Above:  Australia and New Guinea, 1951

Scanned from Hammond’s Complete World Atlas (1951), 104

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THE MARTYRS OF NEW GUINEA (AUGUST 1942-OCTOBER 1943)

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We must endeavour to carry on our work.  God expects this of us.  The church at home, which sent us out, expects it of us.  The universal church expects it of us.  We could ever hold up our faces again if, for our own safety, we all forsook Him and fled, when the shadows of the Passion began to gather around Him in His spiritual and mystical body, the Church in Papua.

–Philip Strong, Anglican Bishop of New Guinea

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Sometimes fidelity to the Gospel of Christ has entailed martyrdom.  It did for many people around the globe during World War II.  For example, on the island of New Guinea, the Japanese invasion (July 22, 1942) preceded the martyrdom of ten Australian Anglican missionaries and two Papuan Anglicans, who risked their lives to witness for Jesus.  Natives suffered under the occupation; Anglican missionaries remained with them.

The feast, as it stands in The Episcopal Church, does not include the two saints martyred in 1943.

The martyrs of August 1942 were:

  1. Henry Matthews, a priest at Port Moresby;
  2. Leslie Gariardi, a Papuan teacher at Port Moresby;
  3. May “Merry” Hayman, a native of Adelaide, and a nurse; and
  4. Mavis Parkinson, a native of Ipswich, Queensland.

Japanese forces executed Hayman and Parkinson near present-day Popondetta.

The martyrs of September 2, 1942, were:

  1. Henry Holland, a priest;
  2. Lucien Tapiedi, their Papuan guide now commemorated with a statue in Westminster Abbey, London;
  3. Lilla Lashmar, from Prospect, South Australia, and a teacher;
  4. Margery Brenchley, an English emigrant to Australia, and a nurse;
  5. John Duffill, a native of Queensland; and
  6. Vivien Redlich, an English-born priest, a former member of the Bush Brotherhood, and the fiancé of May “Merry” Hayman.

Japanese forces executed them at Buna Beach.

The martyrs of 1943 were:

  1. Bernard Moore, a priest; and
  2. John Barge, an English-born priest.

They were friends.  Moore had an opportunity to flee to a safe place honorably, but he remained to help his friend, Barge.  Moore apparently died of malaria or another disease.  Barge became a martyr at Japanese hands in October 1943.

While preparing this post I relied primarily on Margaret Bride‘s I Wait for the Lord; My Soul Waits for Him:  And in His Word is My Hope.

I encourage you, O reader, to click on the link above and read that excellent resource.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 18, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF BARTHOLOMÉ DE LAS CASAS, “APOSTLE TO THE INDIANS”

THE FEAST OF ARTHUR PENRHYN STANLEY, ANGLICAN DEAN OF WESTMINSTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDWARD WILLIAM LEINBACH, U.S. MORAVIAN MUSICIAN AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF ELIZABETH FERARD, FIRST DEACONESS IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND

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Almighty God, we remember before you this day the blessed martyrs of New Guinea who,

following the example of their Savior, laid down their lives for their friends;

and we pray that we who honor their memory may imitate their loyalty and faith;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 22:11-13

Psalm 126

1 Thessalonians 5:21b-24

Luke 12:4-12

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 557

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Feast of Francois Mauriac (September 1)   Leave a comment

Above:  Signature of François Mauriac

Image in the Public Domain

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FRANÇOIS CHARLES MAURIAC (OCTOBER 11, 1885-SEPTEMBER 1, 1970)

French Roman Catholic Novelist, Christian Humanist, and Social Critic

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Our hidden life with Christ ought to have some bearing on our lives as citizens.  We cannot approve or practice publicly in the name of Caesar what the Lord condemns, disapproves, or curses, whether it be failure to honor our word, exploitation of the poor, police torture, or regimes of terror.

–François Mauriac, quoted in Robert Ellsberg, All Saints (1997), 378

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François Mauriac joins the ranks at this, my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days via Robert Ellsberg, author of All Saints:  Daily Reflections on Saints, Prophets, and Witnesses for Our Time (1997), a resource invaluable for my hobby of hagiography.

Mauriac, born in Bordeaux, France, on October 11, 1885, was a giant of French literature.  His father died when he was an infant.  Our saint’s stern, Jansenist mother inculcated a strong sense of sin within Mauriac and his four siblings.  (Jansenism, the Roman Catholic counterpart to Calvinism, is, according to Holy Mother Church, a heresy.  The official Roman Catholic position is Semi-Pelagianism.)  From grandparents Mauriac learned bourgeois values, as respectability, business, and marrying into a good family.  Another strong influence on our saint was Blaise Pascal (1623-1662).

The strong senses of sin and grace pervaded Mauriac’s novels.  Sin distorted the lives of his characters, but not one–not even the most villainous one–was beyond redemption.  Grace was never far away, and sainthood will always a possibility.

For Sartre hell is other people; but for us, others are Christ.

–Mauriac, quoted in All Saints, 377

Mauriac, who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1952, recognized French capitulation (ubiquitous, not universal) to Nazi rule and willingness to deport Jews as collective moral failures.  This sense informed a later work, The Son of Man, about the humanity of Jesus.  Mauriac wrote,

All tyrannies are founded upon contempt for man.  When this temptation to contempt overcomes us, we must remember that Christ was a man like us.  If He was one of us, then every man, no matter how miserable he is, has a capacity for God.

–Mauriac, quoted in All Saints, 378

Our saint, aged 85 years, died in Paris, France, on September 1, 1970.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 18, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF BARTHOLOMÉ DE LAS CASAS, “APOSTLE TO THE INDIANS”

THE FEAST OF ARTHUR PENRHYN STANLEY, ANGLICAN DEAN OF WESTMINSTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDWARD WILLIAM LEINBACH, U.S. MORAVIAN MUSICIAN AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF ELIZABETH FERARD, FIRST DEACONESS IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring François Mauriac and all those

who with words have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior, who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 3:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 728

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Feast of Blesseds Luigi Beltrame Quattrocchi and Maria Corsini Beltrame Quattrocchi (August 26)   Leave a comment

 

Above:  Blesseds Luigi and Maria Beltrame Quattrocchi

Images in the Public Domain

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BLESSED LUIGI BELTRAME QUATTROCCHI (JANUARY 12, 1880-NOVEMBER 8, 1951)

His feast transferred from November 9 and November 25

husband of 

BLESSED MARIA CORSINI BELTRAME QUATTROCCHI (JUNE 24, 1884-AUGUST 26, 1965)

Alternative feast day = November 25

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ITALIAN ROMAN CATHOLIC HUMANITARIANS

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[They] made their family an authentic domestic church, open to life, prayer, witness to the Gospel, the social apostolate, and solidarity with the poor, and friendship.

–Cardinal José Saraiva Martins, Prefect of the Congregation of the Causes of Saints, on our saints

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Tony Hendra, in Father Joe, quoted Father Joe as telling him that the Roman Catholic Church had not canonized enough married couples. Holy Mother Church has not canonized Luigi and Maria Corsini Beltrame Quattrocchi yet, but it has beatified them–together.  Pope John Paul II declared them Venerables on July 7, 2001, and Blesseds on October 21, 2001.  The three surviving children–including a priest and a monk-priest–attended the beatification ceremony.

Luigi Beltrame, born in Catatania, Italy, on January 12, 1880, was a son of Carlo and Francesca Beltrame.  For most of his youth, however, his childless uncle Luigi and aunt Stefania Quattrocchi raised him.  Uncle Luigi worked for Royal Customs, a career path that took the family to Rome in 1890.  Our saint lived in the Eternal City for the rest of her life.  He graduated from law school in 1902 and went to work in the banking industry.

Maria Corsini, born in Florence, Italy, on June 24, 1884, was a daughter of Giulia Salvi and soldier Angiolo Corsini.  The family moved frequently because of military reassignments.  The pious family made sure that Maria received a fine education.  She met Luigi Beltrame Quattrocchi in Rome in 1901.  On November 25, 1905, in the Chapel of St. Catherine, at the Basilica of St. Maria Maggiore, Rome, she married Luigi.  Maria became an educator–even a professor of education.

The couple had four children from 1906 to 1914.  Filippo (b. 1906) became a priest.  Stefania (b. 1908) became a nun.  Cesare (b. 1909) became a monk-priest.  Enrichietta (b. 1914) and her mother almost did not survive that difficult pregnancy.  Maria was more devout than Luigi during the early years of their marriage, but he became more religious by 1914.  Enrichietta, who remained a lay person and cared for her aging parents, helped to solidify Luigi’s faith.

The couple lived their faith.  Maria helped victims of the earthquake at Avezzano in 1914.  That year she became a catechist among women at St. Vitale parish, Rome.  She was a Red Cross nurse in 1915-1918, a Franciscan tertiary from 1917, a member of the female branch of Catholic Action from 1920, and a Red Cross nurse during World War II.  She and Luigi, active in scouting programs for youth in Rome, were once supporters of Benito Mussolini and the Fascist Party, but they renounced that position.  (Mussolini and his fellow fascists wanted to make Italy great again.)  During World War II they took refugees, including Jews, into their home, at great risk to themselves.

Luigi died of a heart attack in Rome on November 9, 1951.  He was 71 years old.

Maria died at Serravalle, Arezzo, Italy, on August 26, 1965.  She was 81 years old.

Pope John Paul II, when recognizing these saints, acknowledged their heroic virtue.  They had it in spades.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 3, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS FLAVIAN AND ANATOLIUS OF CONSTANTINOPLE, PATRIARCHS; AND SAINTS AGATHO, LEO II, AND BENEDICT II, BISHOPS OF ROME; DEFENDERS OF CHRISTOLOGICAL ORTHODOXY

THE FEAST OF CHARLES ALBERT DICKINSON, U.S. CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF IMMANUEL NITSCHMANN, GERMAN-AMERICAN MORAVIAN MINISTER AND MUSICIAN; HIS BROTHER-IN-LAW, JACOB VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP, MUSICIAN, COMPOSER, AND EDUCATOR; HIS SON, WILLIAM HENRY VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP; HIS BROTHER, CARL ANTON VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN MINISTER, COMPOSER, AND EDUCATOR; HIS DAUGHTER. LISETTE (LIZETTA) MARIA VAN VLECK MEINUNG; AD HER SISTER, AMELIA ADELAIDE VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN COMPOSER AND EDUCATOR

THE FEAST OF JOHN CENNICK, BRITISH MORAVIAN EVANGELIST AND HYMN WRITER

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Almighty God, you have surrounded us with a great cloud of witnesses:

Grant that we, encouraged by the good examples of your servants

Blessed Luigi Beltrame Quattrocchi and Blessed Maria Corsini Beltrame Quattrocchi,

may persevere in running the race that is set before us,

until at last we may with them attain to your eternal joy;

through Jesus Christ, the pioneer and perfecter of our faith,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Micah 6:6-8

Psalm 15

Hebrews 12:1-2

Matthew 25:31-40

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 724

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Feast of Blessed Levkadia Harasymiv (August 26)   Leave a comment

Above:  Blessed Levkadia Harasymiv

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED LEVKADIA HARASYMIV (SEPTEMBER 30, 1911-AUGUST 28, 1952)

Ukrainian Greek Catholic Nun, and Martyr, 1952

Alternative feast days = April 2 and August 28

Alternative feast day (as one of thee Martyrs Killed Under Communist Regimes in Eastern Europe) = June 27

The political-geographical changes during the lifetime of Blessed Levkadia Harsymiv meant that she lived in the Austro-Hungarian Empire (until 1918), West Ukraine (1918-1919), Poland (1919-1939), the Soviet occupation zone (1939-1945), and the Soviet Union (1945f).  She, born in Rudnyky (now in Ukraine) on September 30, 1911, joined the Sisters of Saint Joseph in 1931 and made her vows two years later.  Agents of the NKVD arrested her for her faith in 1951.  She, sent first to Borislav, Ukraine, ended up a prisoner in Siberia–first in Tomsk then in Kharsk.  Harasymiv died of tuberculosis on August 28, 1952.  She was 40 years old.

Pope John Paul II declared Harasymiv a Venerable then a Blessed in 2001.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 3, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS FLAVIAN AND ANATOLIUS OF CONSTANTINOPLE, PATRIARCHS; AND SAINTS AGATHO, LEO II, AND BENEDICT II, BISHOPS OF ROME; DEFENDERS OF CHRISTOLOGICAL ORTHODOXY

THE FEAST OF CHARLES ALBERT DICKINSON, U.S. CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF IMMANUEL NITSCHMANN, GERMAN-AMERICAN MORAVIAN MINISTER AND MUSICIAN; HIS BROTHER-IN-LAW, JACOB VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP, MUSICIAN, COMPOSER, AND EDUCATOR; HIS SON, WILLIAM HENRY VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP; HIS BROTHER, CARL ANTON VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN MINISTER, COMPOSER, AND EDUCATOR; HIS DAUGHTER. LISETTE (LIZETTA) MARIA VAN VLECK MEINUNG; AD HER SISTER, AMELIA ADELAIDE VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN COMPOSER AND EDUCATOR

THE FEAST OF JOHN CENNICK, BRITISH MORAVIAN EVANGELIST AND HYMN WRITER

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Almighty God, who gave to your servant Blessed Levkadia Harasymiv

boldness to confess the Name of our Savior Jesus Christ before the rulers of this world,

and courage to die for this faith:

Grant that we may always be ready to give a reason for the hope that is in us,

and to suffer gladly for the sake of our Lord Jesus Christ,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

2 Esdras 2:42-48

Psalm 126 or 121

1 Peter 3:14-18, 22

Matthew 10:16-22

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 713

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Feast of Blessed Maria Troncatti (August 25)   Leave a comment

Above:  Blessed Maria Troncatti

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED MARIA TRONCATTI (FEBRUARY 16, 1883-AUGUST 25, 1969)

Italian Roman Catholic Nun and Missionary in Ecuador

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A look at the crucifix gives me life and the courage to work.

–Blessed Maria Troncatti

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Blessed Maria Troncatti, born in Corteno Golgi, Brescia, Italy, on February 16, 1883, spent most of her life in Ecuador.  She, growing up in a devout family on a farm, discerned her religious vocation at an early age.  In 1908 she joined the Salesian Sisters of Saint John Bosco (in full the Daughters of Mary, Help of Christians), founded by St. John Bosco (1815-1888) and St. Maria Domenica Mazzarello (1837-1881) in 1872 to teach young people, especially the poor, female, and at-risk.  Our saint, a Red Cross nurse in the military hospital in Varazza in 1915-1918, relocated to Ecuador in 1922.  That country remained her home for the rest of her life.  She filled a variety of roles, including evangelist, catechist, surgeon, nurse, anesthesiologist, and dentist, among the Shuar people of the Amazon Basin.  Our saint, a kind person and a practical problem-solver, joined with other Salesian missionaries in defending the cultural and land rights of the Shuar people against incursions by settlers in the 1960s.  Some of those settlers resorted to violence.  Troncatti, aged 86 years, died en route to a spiritual retreat when the airplane she was in crashed at Sueúa, Morona-Santiago, Ecuador, on August 25, 1969.

Pope Benedict XVI declared Troncatti a Venerable in 2008 and a Blessed in 2012.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 3, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS FLAVIAN AND ANATOLIUS OF CONSTANTINOPLE, PATRIARCHS; AND SAINTS AGATHO, LEO II, AND BENEDICT II, BISHOPS OF ROME; DEFENDERS OF CHRISTOLOGICAL ORTHODOXY

THE FEAST OF CHARLES ALBERT DICKINSON, U.S. CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF IMMANUEL NITSCHMANN, GERMAN-AMERICAN MORAVIAN MINISTER AND MUSICIAN; HIS BROTHER-IN-LAW, JACOB VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP, MUSICIAN, COMPOSER, AND EDUCATOR; HIS SON, WILLIAM HENRY VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP; HIS BROTHER, CARL ANTON VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN MINISTER, COMPOSER, AND EDUCATOR; HIS DAUGHTER. LISETTE (LIZETTA) MARIA VAN VLECK MEINUNG; AD HER SISTER, AMELIA ADELAIDE VAN VLECK, U.S. MORAVIAN COMPOSER AND EDUCATOR

THE FEAST OF JOHN CENNICK, BRITISH MORAVIAN EVANGELIST AND HYMN WRITER

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God of grace and glory, we praise you for your servant Blessed Maria Troncatti,

who made the good news known in Ecuador.

Raise up, we pray, in every country, heralds of the gospel,

so that the world may know the immeasurable riches of your love,

and be drawn to worship you, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Isaiah 62:1-7

Psalm 48

Romans 10:11-17

Luke 24:44-53

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 59

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