Archive for the ‘Saints of the 1920s’ Category

Feast of Teresa Maria Mastena (June 28)   Leave a comment

Above:  Blessed Teresa Maria Mastena 

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED TERESA MARIA MASTENA (DECEMBER 7, 1881-JUNE 28, 1951)

Foundress of the Institute of the Holy Face

Also known as Blessed Maria Pia Mastena and Sister Passitea of the Child Jesus

Blessed Teresa Maria Mastena learned the hard way that the cloister was not the place for her to live.  She, born in Bovolone, Verona, Italy, on December 7, 1881, was the fifth of five children of Giulio Mastena (a grocer) and Maria Antonia Casarotti (an elementary teacher).  Our saint grew up in a devout family.  On March 19, 1891, when Mastena took her First Communion, she also made a private vow of charity.  At the age of 17 years our saint joined the Institute of the Sisters of Mary at Verona.  On October 24, 1903, she made her vows and became Sister Passitea of the Child Jesus.  Although Sister Passitea obeyed the rules of the cloister strictly, she realized that she should be elsewhere.

So Mastena left the cloister.  She became the headmistress of a school in Miame, Italy.  Later she led educational institutions in Carpesica and San Fior.  At San Fior, in 1930, our saint founded the Institute of the Sisters of the Holy Face, to

propagate, repair and restore Jesus’ gentle image in souls.

Six years later the first sisters made their vows and Mastena became the Superior General of the order.  She served in that capacity for the rest of her life.

Mastena died in Rome on June 28, 1951.  She was 69 years old.

Pope John Paul II declared Mastena a Venerable in 2002.  Pope Benedict XVI beatified her three years later.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 7, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF HELDER CAMARA, ROMAN CATHOLIC ARCHBISHOP OF OLINDA AND RECIFE

THE FEAST OF SAINT ADALBERT NIERYCHLEWSKI, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR

THE FEAST OF MITCHELL J. DAHOOD, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND BIBLICAL SCHOLAR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MOSES, APOSTLE TO THE SARACENS

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O God, by whose grace your servant Blessed Teresa Maria Mastena,

kindled with the flame of your love, became a burning and a shining light in your Church:

Grant that we also may be aflame with the spirit of love and discipline,

and walk before you as children of light;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Acts 2:42-47

Psalm 133 or 34:1-8 or 119:161-168

2 Corinthians 6:1-10

Matthew 6:24-33

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 723

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Feast of Virgil Michel (June 26)   Leave a comment

Above:  St. John’s Abbey Church, St. John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota

Image Source = Library of Congress

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VIRGIL MICHEL (JUNE 26, 1890-NOVEMBER 26, 1938)

U.S. Roman Catholic Monk, Academic, and Pioneer of Liturgical Renewal

Also known as George Michel

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Liturgy is essentially the Christian faith prayed; it is dogma set to prayer.

–Virgil Michel

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Virgil Michel comes to my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days courtesy of Robert Ellsberg, All Saints:  Daily Reflections on Saints, Prophets, and Witnesses for Our Time (New York:  The Crossroad Publishing Company, 1997).

George Michel, born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on June 26, 1890, was a man ahead of his time.  In that respect he was like many other pioneers.  Fred and Mary Michel presided over a devout Roman Catholic family that emphasized the value of education.  Our saint, as a young man, mastered five languages.  In 1903 Michel matriculated at St. John’s Preparatory School, Collegeville, Minnesota.  Six years later he became a Benedictine novice, as Virgil Michel.

Michel, ordained to the priesthood in 1916, was an academic.  He taught at St. John’s Preparatory School then became a professor of English and philosophy at St. John’s University.  Later in life our saint was Dean there.  Michel maintained a rigorous schedule as he suffered from overwork and worsening eyesight.

Michel, who earned his Ph.D. in English from The Catholic University of America, valued liturgical renewal.  It had been on his mind before he traveled in Europe, where he witnessed it, in 1924-1925.  He sought to recapture the Mass as an expression of faith; the Mass should never be a spectator sport event, he insisted.  This effort required liturgical reform and the backing away from clericalism–the recognition of the people as the Body of Christ.  Michael presaged Vatican II (1962-1965).

For Michel the link between liturgical renewal and social justice was plain:

The entire life of the true Christian must be a reflection and a further expression of his life at the altar of God.   If he is predominantly a passive Christian there, can we expect him to be an active Christian in the world?

–Virgil Michel

His spirituality of lived values and social reform–of the sanctification of the world rather than the flight from it–influenced Dorothy Day (1897-1980).

Michel, aged 48 years, died at Collegeville on November 26, 1938.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 6, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCUS AURELIUS CLEMENS PRUDENTIUS, POET AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINTS MATEO CORREA-MAGALLANES AND MIGUEL AGUSTIN PRO, MEXICAN ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS AND MARTYRS

THE FEAST OF SAINT VEDAST (VAAST), ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF ARRAS AND CAMBRAI

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM BOYCE AND JOHN ALCOCK, ANGLICAN COMPOSERS

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Almighty God, we praise you for your servant Virgil Michel,

through whom you have called the church to its tasks and renewed its life.

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your church and proclaim the reality of your reign,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Feast of Blessed Andrea Giacinto Longhin (June 26)   Leave a comment

Above:  Blessed Andrea Giacinto Longhin

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED ANDREA GIACINTO LONGHIN (NOVEMBER 23, 1863-JUNE 26, 1936)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Treviso

Also known as Hyacinth Bonaventure Longhin and Andrew of Campodarsego

Blessed Andrea Giacinto Longhin was a faithful servant of God, sometimes to the consternation of civil authorities.  Hyacinth Bonaventure Longhin, born in Fiumicello di Campodarsego, on the Italian peninsula, on November 23, 1863, was the only child of tenant farmers Matthew and Judith Marin, devout Roman Catholics.  Young Hyacinth discerned a vocation to the priesthood.  His father, however, opposed him becoming a Capuchin novice (as Andrew of Campodarsego) at Venice, on August 27, 1879.

Longhin had found his vocation.  He studied theology at Padua and Venice, took his vows on October 4, 1883, and joined the ranks of priests on June 19, 1886.  For years he taught and provided spiritual direction to new members of the order.  In 1889 Longhin became the director of Capuchin teachers at Padua.  Two years later he became the director of theology students at Venice.  Then, in 1902, our saint became the Capuchin Provincial Minister at Venice.

Longhin served as the Bishop of Treviso, Italy, from 1904 to 1936.  He, a conscientious bishop, worked for the benefit of his flock.  Our saint supported the right of workers to unionize, increased the number of religious in his diocese, and made spiritual retreats available to priests.  Longhin also abhorred violence.  He therefore refused to support the war effort during World War I, but he did organize efforts to assist the poor, the sick, the wounded, and soldiers.  Late in the war our saint remained in the city despite the war-related destruction.  He forbade priests to leave unless they were doing so to minister to refugees.  Longhin’s politics led to his conviction and incarceration for the crime of defeatism.  (Jingoism has never been a virtue.)  Several priests also went to prison for the same offense.  After the war Longhin supervised the rebuilding of the 47 destroyed parishes in his diocese.  Our saint became the Apostolic Visitor to Padua in 1923 then to Udine in 1927.  He also opposed the Fascist Party, which came to power after World War I.

Longhin died, aged 72 years, at Treviso, on June 26, 1936.  He had been ill for eight months.

Pope John Paul II declared Longhin a Venerable in 1998 then a Blessed four years later.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 6, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCUS AURELIUS CLEMENS PRUDENTIUS, POET AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINTS MATEO CORREA-MAGALLANES AND MIGUEL AGUSTIN PRO, MEXICAN ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS AND MARTYRS

THE FEAST OF SAINT VEDAST (VAAST), ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF ARRAS AND CAMBRAI

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM BOYCE AND JOHN ALCOCK, ANGLICAN COMPOSERS

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O God, our heavenly Father, who raised up your faithful servant

Blessed Andrea Giacinto Longhin

to be a bishop and pastor in your Church and to feed your flock:

Give abundantly to all pastors the gifts of your Holy Spirit,

that they may minister in your household as true servants of Christ

and stewards of your divine mysteries;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with

 you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84 or 84:7-11

Ephesians 3:14-21

Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 719

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Feast of Isabel Florence Hapgood (June 26)   Leave a comment

Above:  Isabel Florence Hapgood

Image in the Public Domain

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ISABEL FLORENCE HAPGOOD (NOVEMBER 21, 1851-JUNE 26, 1928)

U.S. Journalist, Translator, and Ecumenist

Isabel Florence Hapgood had a gift for languages.  She used it well.  Our saint, born to a wealthy family of Boston, Massachusetts, on November 21, 1851, was an Episcopalian from cradle to grave.  From 1855 to 1881 she grew up in the family home in Worcester, Massachusetts.  Hapgood, educated at private schools in Worcester then in Farmington, Connecticut, had demonstrated her linguistic abilities before she graduated from Miss Proctor’s School, Farmington, in 1868, the year her father, Asa, died.  During the next ten years Hapgood studied Germanic languages, Romance languages, Polish, Russian, and Church Slavonic; she had already mastered French and Latin.  In 1885 she published The Epic Songs of Russia, her first book of translations from Russian.  Many more volumes, mostly of translations from Russian, Spanish, Italian, French, Polish, Dutch, and Portuguese, followed.  Hapgood made many works of literature written in foreign languages available to English-language readers.

From 1887 to 1917 Hapgood visited Russia frequently.  She, fluent in conversational Russian, befriended many important people, including luminaries of the Russian Orthodox Church, as well as Leo Tolstoy, some of whose works she translated into Russian.  In 1891 and 1892 she helped him raise funds in the United States to help victims of a famine in Russia.  Our saint, who understood the value of proper liturgy and good liturgical singing, helped to organize the choir of the new St. Nicholas Cathedral, New York City, in 1903.  Her liturgical masterpiece, which she translated with the permission of Orthodox bishops in North America, was the Service Book of the Holy Orthodox-Catholic Apostolic (Greco-Russian) Church (first edition, 1906), about which St. Tikhon of Moscow (1865-1925), then the Bishop of the Aleutians, was enthusiastic.  The Russian Revolutions of 1917 halted Hapgood’s visits to Russia, so she helped Russians who had fled their homeland and assisted others in getting out.

Hapgood was also a journalist.  She was a foreign correspondent for The Nation and The New York Evening Post.  Our saint also contributed to The New York Times, Harper’s Weekly, The Century, and The Atlantic Monthly.

Hapgood died in New York City on June 26, 1928.  She was 76 years old.

The Episcopal Church added Hapgood, respected in the Orthodox Church, to the denominational calendar of saints at the General Convention of 2009.  This was just, for her work of translating the Divine Liturgy into English facilitated Anglican-Eastern Orthodox dialogues.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 5, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE MARTYRS OF JAPAN, 1597-1639

THE FEAST OF SAINT AVITUS OF VIANNE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF SAINT JANE (JOAN) OF VALOIS, COFOUNDER OF THE SISTERS OF THE ANNUNCIATION

THE FEAST OF SAINTS PHILEAS AND PHILOROMUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYRS

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Loving God, we thank you for the work and witness of Isabel Florence Hapgood:

Guide us as we persevere in the reconciliation of all people, that we may be one in Christ;

who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, unto the ages of ages.  Amen.

A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  A Calendar of Commemorations (2016)

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Loving God, we thank you for the work and witness of Isabel Florence Hapgood,

who introduced the Divine Liturgy of the Russian Orthodox Church to English-speaking Christians,

and encouraged dialogue between Anglicans and Orthodox.

Guide us as we build on the foundation that she gave us,

that all may be one in Christ; who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, to the ages of ages.  Amen.

Isaiah 6:1-5

Psalm 24

Revelation 5:8-14

John 17:17-23

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 441

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Feast of Rufus Jones (June 16)   1 comment

Above:  Rufus Jones

Image in the Public Domain

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RUFUS MATTHEW JONES (JANUARY 25, 1863-JUNE 16, 1948)

U.S. Quaker Theologian and Cofounder of the American Friends Service Committee

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This child will one day bear the message of the gospel to distant lands and to people across the sea.

–Peace Jones, aunt of Rufus Jones, speaking of her newborn nephew

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Rufus Matthew Jones did just that.  He, born in South China, Maine, on January 25, 1863, was a son of Edwin Jones and Mary Gifford Hoxie Jones.  Our saint grew up in a Quaker family.  He was a diligent scholar from an early age, studying first in a one-room village school, eventually transferring to Oak Grove Seminary (in nearby Vassalboro, Maine), then attending Providence Friends School (in Rhode Island).  After graduating from Haverford College, Haverford, Pennsylvania, in 1885, Jones taught at Oakwood Seminary, Union Springs, New York.  In 1886-1887 our saint studied at Heidelberg University, in Germany.  Next, in 1887, Jones became a teacher at Providence Friends School.  Two years later he began to serve as the principal of Oak Grove Seminary, Vassalboro.  Then, from 1893 to 1934, our saint taught psychology and philosophy at Haverford College.  Howard Thurman was one of his pupils.

Jones was a philosopher, historian, mystic, prolific writer, and agent of social reform.  In 1915 he helped to found the Fellowship of Reconciliation.  Two years later he and Henry founded the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC).  The AFSC’s initial purpose was to help conscientious objectors serve in non-combat roles, such as driving ambulances, during World War I.  The AFSC, of which Jones served as chair until 1928 and again in 1935-1936, became a relief and humanitarian agency after the Great War.  Its good works included feeding many Germans after the alleged war to end all wars and helping Jewish refugees in the 1930s.

Jones, husband first of Sarah Coutant (from 1888 to 1899), who died of tuberculosis, then of Elizabeth Cadbury (1902f), was an advocate of Quaker unity.  He used his position as the Editor of the Friends Review (1893-1894)/The American Friend (1894-1912) to work toward this goal.  The AFSC, with its inter-Quaker cooperation, also served this ecumenical purpose.  The organic union of Yearly Meetings across Orthodox, Conservative, and Hicksite lines, or combinations of two of the three, started after Jones died, however.  The various New York, Ohio, and Philadelphia Yearly Meetings merged into composite New York, Ohio, and Philadelphia Yearly Meetings in 1955.  The consolidation of the Baltimore Yearly Meetings followed in 1968.

Jones, a man committed to Christian missions, was not hostile to other religions.  In 1927, while traveling in Asia, he met with Mohandas Gandhi.  Later during that trip our saint spoke to the World Missionary Conference at Jerusalem.  He encouraged delegates, while supporting evangelism, to recognize the positive elements in other religions.

Jones advocated for German Jews in the 1930s.  In 1938, after the Kristallnacht, our saint was one-third of a Quaker delegation that visited the headquarters of the Gestapo.  The humanitarian Quakers, using the AFSC’s track record of feeding many otherwise-starving Germans after World War I, negotiated with Reinhard Heydrich, later an architect of, as the Third Reich put it creepily, “the final solution to the Jewish problem,” the “Jewish problem” being that Jews were alive.  The Quaker visitors received permission to send relief aid for Jews and to aid and abet the emigration of many Jews, thereby saving lives.

Jones, who was on the Modernist side of Quaker theology, spent his final years as he had spent his previous ones–living out Quaker values.  He represented the AFSC at the Nobel Prize ceremony in 1947, when the organization won the Peace Prize.  (A Quaker organization winning the Nobel Peace Prize is logical.)  He died, aged 85 years, at Haverford, Pennsylvania, on June 16, 1948.

The American Friends Service Committee and the Fellowship of Reconciliation continue in work of which Jones would approve–creating peace, advocating for immigrants and refugees, opposing discrimination, working for economic justice, et cetera–in other words, loving one’s neighbors as one loves oneself.  That sounds Christian to me.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 23, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN THE ALMSGIVER, ROMAN CATHOLIC PATRIACH OF ALEXANDRIA

THE FEAST OF CASPAR NEUMANN, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF PHILLIPS BROOKS, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF MASSACHUSETTS

THE FEAST OF THOMAS A. DOOLEY, PHYSICIAN AND HUMANITARIAN

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served,

and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Feast of Blesseds Giovanni Maria Boccardo and Luigi Boccardo (June 9)   Leave a comment

Above:  Turin, 1890

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-06635

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BLESSED GIOVANNI MARIA BOCCARDO (NOVEMBER 20, 1848-DECEMBER 30, 1913)

Founder of the Poor Daughters of Saint Cajetan/Gaetano

His feast transferred from December 30

brother of

BLESSED LUIGI BOCCARDO (AUGUST 9, 1861-JUNE 9, 1936)

Apostle of Merciful Love

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His charism as an educator and founder was to reveal the merciful love of Jesus, priest and king, to his brothers, especially in the education of the clergy…and in the spiritual direction of many that approached him in the confessional.

–Mother Teresa Ponsi, Superior General of the Poor Sisters of Saint Cajetan/Gaetano

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The Boccardo Brothers did much to help their fellow human beings.

Gasparo Boccardo and Giuseppina Malerba Boccardo, parents of ten children, raised a pious family.  Their eldest child was Giovanni Maria Boccardo, born in Moncalieri, Turin, on November 20, 1848.  A younger brother was Luigi Boccardo, Giovanni Maria’s godson, born on August 9, 1861.  The Barnabites educated both brothers; Giovanni Maria graduated from their high school in 1864.  Next he attended seminary.  In 1871, in Turin, Giovanni Maria became a priest.  Luigi followed suit, also in Turin, thirteen years later.

The Boccardo brothers eventually came to work together.  Giovanni Maria initially taught in seminary.  Next he served as the spiritual director of seminarians in Turin.  He, having earned his doctorate in theology in 1877, became honorary canon at the Church of Sancta Maria della Scala, Chieri, Turin.  Starting in 1882 Giovanni Maria was a parish priest in Pancalieri, Turin.  There he cared for the sick and the poor, helped at other congregations, became involved in the religious education of children and in prison ministry, ministered to victims of a cholera outbreak in 1884, and founded a hospice for the poor sick later that year.  Giovanni Maria also founded the Poor Daughters of Saint Cajetan/Gaetano, to care for the poor sick, the elderly, the neglected, ill priests, and the longterm sick.  Luigi served as his brother’s assistant priest at Pancalieri, Turin.  Luigi also served as the Vice-Rector and spiritual director at Consolata College, Turin.  He taught and provided spiritual direction to seminarians, visited prisoners, and heard many confessions.

Giovanni Maria, afflicted with paralysis in 1911, had to surrender his ministries during the next two years.  He, aged 65 years, died in Moncalieri, Turin, on December 30, 1913.  He left behind 44 volumes of writings about spiritual matters.  Pope John Paul II declared Giovanni Maria a Venerable then a Blessed in 1998.

Luigi continued in good works after his brother died.  The younger brother took over as a Superior of the Poor Sisters of Saint Cajetan/Gaetano in 1913.  Six years later he became the director of a school for the blind.  In 1932 Luigi founded the Sisters of Jesus the King, a contemplative branch of the Poor Daughters of Saint Cajetan/Gaetano.

Luigi, aged 76 years, died in Turin on June 9, 1936.  Pope John Paul II declared him a Venerable in 2003.  Pope Benedict XVI raised him to the status of Blessed in 2007.

The Boccardo brothers understood that how they cared for others–especially the vulnerable–was of the highest moral imperative.  That which they did for the least, they did for Jesus.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 18, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE CONFESSION OF SAINT PETER THE APOSTLE

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served, and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Feast of Roland Allen (June 8)   Leave a comment

Above:  Roland Allen

Image in the Public Domain

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ROLAND ALLEN (DECEMBER 29, 1868-JUNE 9, 1947)

Anglican Priest, Missionary, and Mission Strategist

The Episcopal Church added Roland Allen to its calendar of saints at the General Convention of 2009.

Roland Allen was, during his lifetime, a marginal figure in global missions.  He, born in Bristol, England, on December 29, 1868, was the fifth of five children of an Anglican priest.  Our saint, an Anglo-Catholic, attended St. John’s College, Oxford, then the Leeds Clergy Training School.  Allen, ordained to the diaconate in 1892 and the priesthood the following year, turned to foreign missions early in his career.  The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel (SPG) dispatched him to its North China Mission in 1895.  Allen was planning to lead a new school for the training of Chinese catechists in 1900 when the Boxer Rebellion started.  He wrote of that time in The Siege of the Peking Legations (1901).  Our saint, on furlough in England, married Mary B. Tarlton.  The Allens, in northern China, welcomed their first child into the world in 1902.  Our saint fell ill, however, so the family returned to England.

There Allen became a parish priest.  He resigned his post in protest in 1907, however.  Our saint could not, in good conscience, obey the rule requiring him to baptize all babies presented for that sacrament, even if the parents lacked any Christian commitment.

Allen spent the rest of his life–much of it in Kenya–researching and pondering missions strategies.  While he did this he supported himself and his family financially by lecturing and writing.  In a series of books, notably Missionary Methods:  St. Paul’s or Ours (1912), Allen argued for revolutionary propositions:

  1. Missionaries should be voluntary clergy with secular employment, in the style of St. Paul the Apostle, who made tents.
  2. Missionaries should abandon all paternalism.
  3. Missionaries should adapt their methods to local customs.
  4. Missionaries should train local people to take over the missions.

Allen, aged 78 years, died in Nairobi, Kenya, on June 9, 1947.  His work did not become influential until the 1960s, however.

Allen understood something crucial:  Western missionaries were often their own worst enemies, bringing with them to foreign lands their prejudices, ethnocentrism, and imperial politics.  This baggage interfered with the fulfillment of Christ’s Great Commission.  Our saint’s critique was sharp and accurate, meant to help the Church.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 18, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE CONFESSION OF SAINT PETER THE APOSTLE

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Almighty God, by your Spirit you opened the Scriptures of your servant Roland Allen,

so that he might lead many to know, live, and proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ:

Give us grace to follow his example, that the variety of those to whom we reach out in love may

receive your saving Word and witness and their own languages and cultures to your glorious Name;

through Jesus Christ, your Word made flesh, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Numbers 11:26-29

Psalm 119:145-152

2 Corinthians 9:8-15

Luke 8:4-15

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 415

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