Archive for the ‘September 6’ Category

Feast of Charles Fox (September 6)   Leave a comment

Above:  Map of New Zealand and Melanesia, 1958

Image Scanned and Cropped from Hammond’s World Atlas–Classics Edition (1958)

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CHARLES ELLIOT FOX (OCTOBER 1, 1878-OCTOBER 28, 1977)

Anglican Missionary in Melanesia

A New Zealand Prayer Book (1989), of The Anglican Church in Aotearoa, New Zealand, and Polynesia, lists September 6 as the feast of “Charles Fox, Scholar, Missionary, 1977.”

Charles Fox, an Anglican priest, was a missionary in Melanesia.  He was the longest-serving expatriate missionary in the Solomon Islands, regardless of denominational affiliation.  He served in Oceania for 71 years (1902-1973).

Fox, a native in England, grew up in New Zealand.  Our saint, born in Stalbridge, England, on October 1, 1878, was a son of Canon John Eliot Fox and Emma Phillips.  Fox and his family moved to New Zealand in 1884.  Our saint was physically frail, especially when very young, so home-schooling was initially necessary.  Later he studied at Napier Boys’ High School, Napier, then at the University of New Zealand, Auckland (B.A. in geology then M.A. in theology).

Fox discerned his vocation to missionary work in the 1890s then acted accordingly.  In 1895 our saint, still in school, met a cricket team of Melanesian boys.  He resolved to serve as a missionary to Melanesians.  Years later, after a brief stint as a science teacher in New Zealand, Fox joined the Melanesian Brotherhood at Norfolk Island (east of Australia and north of New Zealand) in 1902.  He took Holy Orders the following year.

Above:  Map Showing Norfolk Island

Fox was initially a teacher at St. Barnabas School, Norfolk Island, the Brotherhood’s main school.

Above:  Map Showing Norfolk Island, New Caledonia, and the New Hebrides

Then Fox spent a few moths on Mota Island, in the New Hebrides.

Above:  Map Showing the Solomon Islands

Next Fox went to Pamua, on Makira Island/San Cristobal Island, in the Solomon Islands.  There he remained until 1905, when he returned to teach on Norfolk Island.  From 1908 to 1918 our saint lived and worked on Makira Island/San Cristobal Island again.  There he opened St. Michael’s School, the first boarding school in the Solomon Islands, in 1911.  The setting was dangerous during the early years; guards were necessary, to protect staff and students from bushmen who beheaded victims.  On the island Fox also became an adopted member of the Arosi tribe and a member of the chief’s household.  Our saint’s exchange name was ‘Takibaina.”  Due to Fox’s short stature, his nickname was “Kakamora.”

Fox earned his Ph.D. in literature from the University of New Zealand in 1922 for his ethnographic study of the Arosi region of Makira Island/San Cristobal Island.

In 1922 the Melanesia Mission closed St. Barnabas School, Norfolk Island, and established its new main school, All Hallows’ School, Pawa, Ugi Island, Solomon Islands.  (Ugi Island is a small isle north of Makira Island/San Cristobal Island.)  From 1924 to 1932 Fox served as the principal of the school.

Fox remained a priest in Melanesia.  In 1932 he declined an opportunity to become the Bishop of Melanesia.  He served at Guadalcanal (1933-1944) then Malaita (1944-1950).  While on Malaita Island Fox served as a coast watcher during World War II.  He also paid pastoral and sacramental visits to villages in the jurisdiction of the anti-colonial Maasina Rule (1944-1952) when his bishop refused to do so.  From 1950 to 1952 Fox was the principal of the diocesan catechists’ school.  He, briefly the chaplain at the headquarters of the Diocese of Melanesia in 1952, went on to serve as the chaplain of the Melanesian Brotherhood at the school at Tabalia in 1952-1954.  Fox, from 1956 the Canon of Melanesia, was again a chaplain, based at Taroaniara, from 1968 to 1970.

Fox retired to New Zealand in 1973.  He, a Member of the Order of the British Empire since 1952, became a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1974.  He died in Waipukurau, New Zealand, on October 28, 1977.  He was 99 years old.

Fox’s legacy included not just the usual fruits of missionary work, but also books about the Solomon Islands and dictionaries of several islands.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 3, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS JOANNA, MARY, AND SALOME, WITNESSES TO THE RESURRECTION

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Almighty and everlasting God, we thank you for your servant Charles Fox,

whom you called to preach the Gospel in the Solomon Islands.

Raise up in this and every land evangelists and heralds of your kingdom,

that your Church may proclaim the unsearchable riches of our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Isaiah 52:7-10

Psalm 96 or 96:1-7

Acts 1:1-9

Luke 10:1-9

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 716

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Feast of William F. Albright and G. Ernest Wright (September 6)   2 comments

Above:  The Seal of The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

Photographer = Carol M. Highsmith

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-highsm-18405

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WILLIAM FOXWELL ALBRIGHT (MAY 24, 1891-SEPTEMBER 19, 1971)

mentor of

GEORGE ERNEST WRIGHT (SEPTEMBER 5, 1909-AUGUST 29, 1974)

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U.S. BIBLICAL SCHOLARS AND ARCHAEOLOGISTS

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According to an old joke, an Evangelical is one who says to a liberal,

I will agree to call you a Christian if you agree to call me a scholar.

This witticism, like many other jokes, depends on a stereotype.  Stereotypes are overly broad generalizations, of course.  You, O reader, might know or have known at least one person who fits that stereotype.  I know and have known some who do.  (I have taught some of them too.  My experiences as a bookish, ritualistic, introverted, and left-of-center outsider with inherent Catholic tendencies growing up in and in the vicinity of Protestant churches in rural southern Georgia, U.S.A., have left me with an overall negative impression of Evangelicalism.)  

Albright was an exception to that stereotype.

Albright came from Methodist stock.  He, born in Coquimbo, Chile, on May 24, 1891, was a son of missionaries Wilbur Finley Albright and Zephine Vila Foxwell.  Our saint, a graduate of Upper Iowa University, earned his doctorate from The Johns Hopkins University in 1913.  In 1922-1929 and 1933-1936 Albright was the Director of the American School of Oriental Research, Jerusalem.  Furthermore, he was a professor of Semitic languages at The Johns Hopkins University from 1927 to 1958, when he retired.

Albright was an Evangelical, but not a Biblical literalist.  He, a leading figure in Biblical archaeology, followed the evidence to conclude, for example, that the Jewish people were originally polytheistic, and that they become monotheistic over time.  (I have repeated that conclusion, much to the consternation of some people.)  Albright also argued against German literary criticism, asserting that, for example, the historical parts of the Hebrew Bible are mostly accurate.

Albright, a great scholar, helped to authenticate the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1948.  He also wrote an article, “The Old Testament World,” for The Interpreter’s Bible.  Albright also edited the volumes on Jeremiah on Jeremiah, Matthew, and Revelation in The Anchor Bible series and co-wrote the volume on Matthew.  For his scholarship Albright received many honors, including the title Yakir Yerushalayim, or “Worthy Citizen of Jerusalem.”

Albright, aged 80 years, died in Baltimore, Maryland, on September 19, 1971.  A posthumous honor was the renaming of the American School of Oriental Research, Jerusalem, as the Albright Institute of Archaeological Research.

Albright was an influential professor who mentored men who went on to become great scholars.  One was Father Raymond E. Brown (1928-1998), about whom I have planned to write a post.  Another student and worthy successor was G. Ernest Wright.

George Ernest Wright, born in Ohio on September 5, 1909, was a Biblical scholar and archaeologist, as well as an expert in dating ancient pottery.  The son of a Presbyterian minister and graduate of McCormick Theological Seminary became a Presbyterian minister in 1934, the year of his graduation.  He continued his studies at The Johns Hopkins University (M.A., 1936; Ph.D., 1937) under the guidance of William F. Albright.  Wright was Professor of Old Testament History and Theology at McCormick Theological Seminary (1939-1958).  Then he moved to Harvard University (the Divinity School, to be precise), serving as the Parkman Professor of Divinity (1958-1974) and the Curator of the Semitic Museum (1961-1974).  He died of a heart attack on August 29, 1974, aged 64 years.

Wright, like his mentor, was a prominent and influential Biblical scholar.  One of Wright’s primary assertions was that study of the Hebrew Bible was germane to the Christian faith.  (That might seem obvious, but obvious statements need scholarly support sometimes.)  He also wrote two commentaries on Isaiah (one of them for The Layman’s Bible Commentary in 1972), and founded The Biblical Archaeologist magazine.  Furthermore, Wright was a General Editor of The Westminster Press’s Old Testament Library series, for which William McKane (1921-2004) wrote Proverbs:  A New Approach (1970).

Albright and Wright were great Christian scholars and Biblical archaeologists.  Their conclusions have continued to come under scrutiny, some of it baseless.  These saints were mere mortals, so, of course, they did not get everything right.  Nevertheless, they got more right than they got wrong.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 3, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS JOANNA, MARY, AND SALOME, WITNESSES TO THE RESURRECTION

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O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [William F. Albright, G. Ernest Wright, and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

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Feast of Aaron Robarts Wolfe (September 6)   1 comment

wolfe_ar

Image Source = http://www.hymntime.com/tch/bio/w/o/l/wolfe_ar.htm

AARON ROBARTS WOLFE (SEPTEMBER 6, 1821-OCTOBER 6, 1902)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

Aaron Robarts Wolfe, U.S. Presbyterian (New School) minister and educator, also wrote a few hymns.  He, born at Mendham, New Jersey, in 1821, graduated from Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts, in 1844 and from Union Theological Seminary, New York, New York, seven years later.  Our saint, whom the Third Presbytery of New York licensed to preach in 1851, served as principal of a school for young women in Tallahassee, Florida, from 1852 to 1855.  Then he returned to the North, where he founded the Hillside Seminary for Young Ladies, Montclair, New Jersey, and served as its principal, retiring finally in 1872 due to ill health.

In 1858 Wolfe submitted seven hymns to Church Melodies:  A Collection of Psalms and Hymns, with Appropriate Music, edited by Thomas Hastings and Thomas S. Hastings.  I have added some of these texts to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  The other titles were:

  1. “Draw Near, O Holy Love, Draw Near;”
  2. “How Blest Indeed are They;”
  3. “My God, I Thank Thee for the Guide;” and
  4. “Mysterious Influence Divine.”

One of Wolfe’s stanzas has stood out in my mind more than any other:

Complete in thee, each want supplied,

And no good thing to me denied,

Since thou my portion, Lord, wilt be,

I ask no more, complete in thee.

–from “Complete in Thee.”

Those words of trust in God speak to my life.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 5, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT AVITUS OF VIENNE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDWARD HAYES PLUMPTRE, ANGLICAN PRIEST

THE FEAST OF THE MARTYRS OF JAPAN

THE FEAST OF SAINTS PHILEAS AND PHILOROMUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYRS

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Aaron Robarts Wolfe and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Allan Crite (September 6)   Leave a comment

Douglass Square, Boston (1936), by Allan Crite

ALLAN ROHAN CRITE (MARCH 20, 1910-SEPTEMBER 6, 2007)

Artist

There are many gifts from God, and art is among them.  Allan Crite received this gift and shared with others.

When The Episcopal Church’s 2009 General Convention approved an overhaul and expansion of the denominational calendar of saints, it replaced the old Lesser Feasts and Fasts book (which became thicker with each successive edition) with Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010).  Page 708 of this volume is an appendix, a list of names of people who might join the calendar, given the passage of sufficient time.  This is where I found the name of Allan Crite.  The General Convention might wait to add him to the official calendar, but I wait no longer than today to add him to mine.

Crite spent almost all of his life in the Boston, Massachusetts, area, where he grew up attending St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church, Cambridge.  Later, as an adult, he was an integral part of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Boston.  Crite, a liturgical artist, designed banners and vestments, painted bulletin covers, and drew stations of the cross.  Much of his work reflected the influence of African-American spirituals and urban settings.  During his long life Crite encouraged artists via various means, including the Artists Collective and the Allan Crite Research Institute, run out of his home.

How did Crite come to arrive at that point?

Crite’s father, Oscar, was an engineer.  His mother, Annamae, was a poet who encouraged her young and talented son to draw.  Crite studied at the Museum of Fine Arts, preferring to attend the school there rather than go to Yale, which had also accepted him.  He graduated in 1936, during the Great Depression, so he worked for Public Works Art Project then the Works Progress Administration, which paid him to paint.  This work was also important because his father, who had  suffered a stroke and become an invalid, died in 1937; somebody had to support Annamae.

From 1940 to 1970 Crite worked as a draftsman at the Boston Naval Shipyard.  It was steady work which enabled him to paint during his spare time.  Later, Crite worked at Grossman Library, Harvard University.

The port draftsman was a noted artist, for, as early as 1936, the Museum of Modern Art showed his work.  And today one can see his work at such noted places as the Smithsonian Institution, the Museum of Fine Arts (his alma mater), the Museum of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and Corcoran Gallery of American Art.

Crite said of himself,

As a visual artist, I am in the communication business, as are all the disciplines of the arts:   the performing arts in music and drama, the written arts from poems, sagas, news items, and all the broadcast media, from talking drums to broadcast networks.  As a visual artist, I am part of that tradition, a storyteller of the drama of man.  This is my small contribution–to tell the African-American experience–in a local sense, of the neighborhood, and, in a larger sense, of its part in the total human experience.

Allan Crite did this well.  He found ways to live his vocation, to glory of God and the benefit of his fellow human beings.  May you, O reader, also live your vocation well, to the glory of God and benefit your fellow human beings.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 28, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT IRENAEUS OF LYONS, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF RANDOLPH ROYALL CLAIBORNE, JR., EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF ATLANTA

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I drew information from the following websites, which contain more details:

http://www.boston.com/news/globe/obituaries/articles/2007/09/08/allan_rohan_crite_97_dean_of_ne_african_american_artists/

http://www.dce.harvard.edu/pubs/alum/1998/04.html

http://www.episcopalarchives.org/Afro-Anglican_history/exhibit/leadership/crite.php

http://www.ecusa.anglican.org/79425_93253_ENG_HTM.htm

http://www.thehistorymakers.com/biography/biography.asp?bioindex=81

http://www.dropbears.com/a/art/biography/Allan_Crite.html

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The collect for the feast is a slightly adapted version of that for “Artists & Writers,” from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 728.  The readings are those for this common of the saints.

Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring Allan Crite

and all those who with images and words

have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior,

who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns,

one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

Saints’ Days and Holy Days for September   Leave a comment

Forget-Me-Nots

Image Source = Wilder Kaiser

1 (Dionysius Exiguus, Roman Catholic Monk and Reformer of the Calendar)

  • David Pendleton Oakerhater, Cheyenne Warrior, Chief, and Holy Man, and Episcopal Deacon and Missionary in Oklahoma
  • Fiacre, Roman Catholic Hermit
  • François Mauriac, French Roman Catholic Novelist, Christian Humanist, and Social Critic

2 (F. Crawford Burkitt, Anglican Scholar, Theologian, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator)

  • David Charles, Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Martyrs of New Guinea, 1942 and 1943
  • William of Roskilde, English-Danish Roman Catholic Bishop

3 (Jedediah Weiss, U.S. Moravian Craftsman, Merchant, and Musician)

  • Arthur Carl Lichtenberger, Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church and Witness for Civil Rights
  • James Bolan Lawrence, Episcopal Priest and Missionary in Southwestern Georgia, U.S.A.
  • Sundar Singh, Indian Christian Evangelist

4 (Paul Jones, Episcopal Bishop of Utah, and Peace Activist; and his colleague, John Nevin Sayre, Episcopal Priest and Peace Activist)

  • E. F. Schumacher, German-British Economist and Social Critic
  • Joseph and Mary Gomer, U.S. United Brethren Missionaries in Sierra Leone
  • William McKane, Scottish Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar

5 (Carl Johannes Sodergren, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Theologian; and his colleague, Claus August Wendell, Swedish-American Lutheran Minister and Theologian)

  • Athol Hill, Australian Baptist Biblical Scholar and Social Prophet
  • Teresa of Calcutta, Foundress of the Congregation of the Missionaries of Charity
  • William Morton Reynolds, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Episcopal Priest, Educator, and Hymn Translator

6 (Charles Fox, Anglican Missionary in Melanesia)

  • Aaron Robarts Wolfe, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Allen Crite, Artist
  • William F. Albright and G. Ernest Wright, U.S. Biblical Scholars and Archaeologists

7 (Beyers Naudé, South African Dutch Reformed Minister and Anti-Apartheid Activist)

  • Elie Naud, Huguenot Witness to the Faith
  • Jane Laurie Borthwick and Sarah Borthwick Findlater, Scottish Presbyterian Translators of Hymns
  • John Duckett and Ralph Corby, Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs in England, 1644

8 (Nikolai Grundtvig, Danish Lutheran Minister, Bishop, Historian, Philosopher, Poet, Educator, and Hymn Writer)

  • Gottfried Wilhelm Sacer, German Lutheran Attorney and Hymn Writer; and Frances Elizabeth Cox, English Hymn Writer and Translator
  • Shepherd Knapp, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Søren Kierkegaard, Danish Philosopher and Theologian, and Father of Existentialism

9 (Martyrs of Memphis, Tennessee, 1878)

  • Francis Borgia, “Second Founder of the Society of Jesus;” Peter Faber, Apostle of Germany, and Cofounder of the Society of Jesus; Alphonsus Rodriguez, Spanish Jesuit Lay Brother; and Peter Claver, “Apostle to the Negroes”
  • Lynn Harold Hough, U.S. Methodist Minister, Theologian, and Biblical Scholar
  • William Chatterton Dix, English Hymn Writer and Hymn Translator

10 (Alexander Crummell, U.S. African-American Episcopal Priest, Missionary, and Moral Philosopher)

  • Mordecai Johnson, Educator
  • Nemesian of Sigum and His Companions, Roman Catholic Bishops and Martyrs, 257
  • Salvius of Albi, Roman Catholic Bishop

11 (Paphnutius the Great, Roman Catholic Bishop of Upper Thebaid)

  • Anne Houlditch Shepherd, Anglican Novelist and Hymn Writer
  • John Stainer and Walter Galpin Alcock, Anglican Church Organists and Composers
  • Patiens of Lyons, Roman Catholic Archbishop

12 (Frederick J. Murphy, U.S. Roman Catholic Biblical Scholar)

  • Franciscus Ch’oe Kyong-Hwan, Korean Roman Catholic Catechist and Martyr, 1839; Lawrence Mary Joseph Imbert, Pierre Philibert Maubant, and Jacques Honoré Chastán, French Roman Catholic Priests, Missionaries to Korea, and Martyrs, 1839; Paul Chong Hasang, Korean Roman Catholic Seminarian and Martyr, 1839; and Cecilia Yu Sosa and Jung Hye, Korean Roman Catholic Martyrs, 1839
  • Kaspar Bienemann, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer
  • William Josiah Irons, Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator; and his daughter, Genevieve Mary Irons, Roman Catholic Hymn Writer

13 (Peter of Chelcic, Bohemian Hussite Reformer; and Gregory the Patriach, Founder of the Moravian Church)

  • Godfrey Thring, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Jane Crewdson, English Quaker Poet and Hymn Writer
  • Narayan Seshadri of Jalna, Indian Presbyterian Evangelist and “Apostle to the Mangs”

14 (HOLY CROSS)

15 (Martyrs of Birmingham, Alabama, September 15, 1963)

  • Charles Edward Oakley, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • James Chisholm, Episcopal Priest
  • Philibert and Aicardus of Jumieges, Roman Catholic Abbots

16 (Cyprian of Carthage, Bishop and Martyr, 258; and Cornelius, Lucius I, and Stephen I, Bishops of Rome)

  • George Henry Trabert, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Missionary, and Hymn Translator and Author
  • James Francis Carney, U.S.-Honduran Roman Catholic Priest, Missionary, Revolutionary, and Martyr, 1983
  • Martin Behm, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer

17 (Jutta of Disibodenberg, Roman Catholic Abbess; and her student, Hildegard of Bingen, Roman Catholic Abbess and Composer)

  • Gerard Moultrie, Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Translator of Hymns
  • Zygmunt Szcesny Felinski, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Warsaw, Titutlar Bishop of Tarsus, and Founder of Recovery for the Poor and the Congregation of the Franciscan Sisters of the Family of Mary
  • Zygmunt Sajna, Polish Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1940

18 (Dag Hammarskjöld, Secretary-General of the United Nations)

  • Edward Bouverie Pusey, Anglican Priest
  • Henry Lascelles Jenner, Anglican Bishop of Dunedin, New Zealand
  • John Campbell Shairp, Scottish Poet and Educator

19 (Theodore of Tarsus, Archbishop of Canterbury)

  • Emily de Rodat, Founder of the Congregation of the Holy Family of Villefranche
  • Walter Chalmers Smith, Scottish Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer
  • William Dalrymple Maclagan, Archbishop of York and Hymn Writer

20 (Henri Nouwen, Dutch Roman Catholic Priest and Spiritual Writer)

  • John Coleridge Patteson, Anglican Bishop of Melanesia, and His Companions, Martyrs, 1871
  • Marie Therese of Saint Joseph, Foundress of the Congregation of the Carmelite Sisters of the Divine Heart of Jesus
  • Nelson Wesley Trout, First African-American U.S. Lutheran Bishop

21 (MATTHEW THE EVANGELIST, APOSTLE AND MARTYR)

22 (Philander Chase, Episcopal Bishop of Ohio, and of Illinois; and Presiding Bishop)

  • C. H. Dodd, Welsh Congregationalist Minister, Theologian, and Biblical Scholar
  • Charlotte Elliott, Julia Anne Elliott, and Emily Elliott, Anglican Hymn Writers
  • Justus Falckner, Lutheran Pastor and Hymn Writer

23 (Amos Niven Wilder, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Poet, Literary Critic, and Biblical Scholar)

  • Bernhard W. Anderson, U.S. United Methodist Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • Elizabeth Kenny, Australian Nurse and Medical Pioneer
  • Francisco de Paula Victor, Brazilian Roman Catholic Priest

24 (Anna Ellison Butler Alexander, African-American Episcopal Deaconess in Georgia, and Educator)

  • Henry Hart Milman, Anglican Dean, Translator, Historian, Theologian, and Hymn Writer
  • Juvenal of Alaska, Russian Orthodox Martyr in Alaska, and First Orthodox Martyr in the Americas, 1796
  • Peter the Aleut, Russian Orthodox Martyr in San Francisco, 1815

25 (Sarah Louise “Sadie” Delany, African-American Educator; her sister, Annie Elizabeth “Bessie” Delany, African-American Dentist; and their brother, Hubert Thomas Delany, African-American Attorney, Judge, and Civil Rights Activist)

  • Euphrosyne and her father, Paphnutius of Alexandria, Monks
  • Herman of Reichenau, Roman Catholic Monk, Liturgist, Poet, and Scholar
  • Sergius of Radonezh, Abbot of the Monastery of the Holy Trinity, Sergiyev Posad, Russia

26 (Paul VI, Bishop of Rome)

  • Frederick William Faber, English Roman Catholic Hymn Writer
  • John Bright, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • John Byrom, Anglican then Quaker Poet and Hymn Writer

27 (Francis de Sales, Roman Catholic Bishop of Geneva; Vincent de Paul, “The Apostle of Charity;’ Louise de Marillac, Cofounder of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul; and Charles Fuge Lowder, Founder of the Society of the Holy Cross)

  • Eliza Scudder, U.S. Unitarian then Episcopalian Hymn Writer
  • Martyrs of Melanesia, 1864-2003

28 (Jehu Jones, Jr., African-American Lutheran Minister)

  • Joseph Hoskins, English Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Lorenzo Ruiz, Roman Catholic Martyr

29 (Mary Ramabai, Prophetic Witness and Evangelist in India)

  • Francis Turner Palgrave, Anglican Poet, Art Critic, and Hymn Writer

30 (Honorius, Archbishop of Canterbury)

Floating

  • Labor Day

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.