Archive for the ‘Albert Schweitzer’ Tag

Feast of Amos Niven Wilder (September 23)   Leave a comment

Above:  A Scan from Volume XII (1957) of The Interpreter’s Bible

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

AMOS NIVEN WILDER (SEPTEMBER 18, 1895-MAY 4, 1993)

U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Poet, Literary Critic, and Biblical Scholar

Amos Niven Wilder comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Interpreter’s Bible.

Wilder came from a remarkable family.  Amos Parker Wilder (1862-1936) was a journalist and sometime diplomat.  He was, until 1906, the editor and partial owner of the Wisconsin State Journal.  During the administrations of Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson, he was U.S. Consul to China, based first in Hong Kong (1906-1909) then Shanghai (1909-1914).  Isabella Thornton Niven (1873-1946), daughter of a Presbyterian minister, was a poet.  She encouraged her children to love language, drama, and literature.  Those children were:

  1. Amos Niven Wilder, born in Madison, Wisconsin, on September 18, 1895;
  2. Thornton Wilder (1897-1975), playwright and novelist;
  3. Charlotte Wilder (1898-1980), poet;
  4. Isabel Wilder (1900-1995), novelist; and
  5. Janet Wilder (Dakin) (1910-1994), zoologist and conservationist.

Our saint combined Biblical scholarship and literary skill.  He matriculated at Oberlin College in 1913, but left to enlist in the U.S. Army in 1916.  Wilder, a corporal, drove ambulances in France and Macedonia.  He, discharged in 1919, studied at Yale University, from which he graduated with a B.A. the following year.  His first volume of poetry, Battle Prospect (1923), won the Yale Younger Prize.  Another volume of poetry, Arachne, followed five years later.  Wilder, as a literary critic, wrote The Spiritual Aspects of the New Poetry (1940).  The ministry beckoned to the young Wilder.  He, while studying at Mansfield College, Oxford, in 1921-1923, was the secretary to Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965).  After continuing theological studies at Yale in 1924, Wilder became a Congregationalist minister in 1926.  He was, for a few years, the pastor of First Church of Christ, Congregational, North Conway, New Hampshire.

Wilder was mainly an academic, though.  After teaching at Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, he became Professor of the New Testament at Andover Newton Theological Seminary, Newton Centre, Massachusetts.  That was his professional position when he met Catharine Kerwin (December 3, 1906-September 1, 2006) during the summer of 1934 and married her in August 1935.  She came from a socially progressive family active in the suffragette movement.  In other words, Catharine and her relatives were the kind of people many would, in the cynical, regressive terms of 2018 that excuse social injustice and other perfidy, label “Social Justice Warriors.”  Catharine, active in the post-World War I peace movement, had earned her B.A. in history from Smith College and became a teacher.  The Wilders, married for nearly 58 years, had two children, Catharine Dix Wilder (b. 1937) and Amos Tappan Wilder (b. 1940).

Wilder, a Ph.D. from Yale since 1933, became Professor of New Testament Interpretation at Chicago Theological Seminary and The University of Chicago and a member of the Federated Theological Faculty of Chicago in 1943.  There he remained until 1954.  In 1949-1950 Wilder doubled as the President of the Chicago Society of Biblical Research.  Wilder spent 1954-1963 as the Hollis Professor of Divinity at Harvard University.  Then, at the age of 68 years, he retired.

Wilder wrote 35 books, published various articles, and contributed to The Interpreter’s Bible.  Theological works included Otherworldiness and the New Testament (1954) and Theopoetic:  Theology and the Religious Imagination (1976).  The posthumously published book was Armageddon Revisited (1994), a memoir of war.  He also served as a Consulting Editor of The Interpreter’s Bible, wrote the article “The Teaching of Jesus II:  The Sermon on the Mount” for Volume VII (1951), and wrote the introduction to and exegesis of the three Letters of John for Volume XII (1957).

Wilder, active in retirement, traveled around the world with Catharine.  He also continued to play tennis, which he had done since his college years.  Wilder was a nationally ranked tennis player.

Wilder, aged 97 years, died on May 4, 1993.

Catharine, aged 99 years, died on September 1, 2006.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 30, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JEANNE JUGAN, FOUNDRESS OF THE LITTLE SISTERS OF THE POOR

THE FEAST OF JOHN LEARY, U.S. ROMAN CATHOLIC SOCIAL ACTIVIST AND ADVOCATE FOR THE POOR

THE FEAST OF KARL OTTO EBERHARDT, GERMAN MORAVIAN ORGANIST, MUSIC EDUCATOR, AND COMPOSER

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Amos Niven Wilder and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of F. Crawford Burkitt (September 2)   1 comment

Above:  Trinity College, Cambridge University, England, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Creator and Copyright Claimant = Detroit Publishing Company

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-08091

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

FRANCIS CRAWFORD BURKITT (SEPTEMBER 3, 1864-MAY 13, 1935)

Anglican Scholar, Theologian, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator

Also known as F. Crawford Burkitt and F. C. Burkitt

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The Liberal theologian’s task is to restate the Christian message that it can be understood by the modern man.  And, further, the Liberal theologian is generally enough of a modern man to believe that some points of what generally asses for the Christian message and the Christian organisation are really outworn, and need to be dropped to make room for new developments and arrangements.

–F. Crawford Burkitt, “Theological Liberalism,” pp. 24-25, in Anglican Liberalism (1908)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Francis Crawford Burkitt was a great scholar of the Bible and other topics.  These subjects included the early Church, the New Testament, hagiography, Roman history, and the Arabic language.  He also wrote one hymn, “Our Lord, His Passion Ended,” and contributed two translations “Wake, O Wake! With Tidings Thrilling” and “Receive, O Lord, in Heaven Above“) to The English Hymnal (1906).

Burkitt, born in London, England, on September 3, 1864, seemed destined for scholarly work.  He, educated at Harrow then at Trinity College, Cambridge University (B.A., 1886; M.A., 1889), joined an expedition to St. Catherine’s Monastery, Mount Sinai, Egypt, in 1893.  The previous year twin sisters Agnes and Margaret Smith, scholars, had discovered a Syraic palimpsest (“A parchment from which one writing has been erased, and on which another has been written,” according to Webster’s New Twentieth Century Dictionary of the English Language–Unabridged, 1951) of the Gospels.  The Smith sisters also participated in the expedition, as did Robert Bensly and James Rendel Harris(I have made a note to myself to consider adding Bensly, Harris, and the Smith sisters to this, my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.)  The five scholars examined the palimpsest and published their findings.  Burkitt, from 1904 a Fellow of the British Academy, became the Norrisian Professor of Divinity at Cambridge University the following year.  He, a layman, held that post for the rest of his life–about 30 years.

The oeuvre of Burkitt’s writings is impressive.  I encourage you, O reader, to seek it at archive.org.

On the personal side, Burkitt, a friend of Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965), was the husband of Amy Persis Parry (1862-1949) and father of Miles Crawford (M. C.) Burkitt (1890-1971), a renowned archaeologist and anthropologist.

Our saint, aged 70 years, died at Grandchester, Cambridgeshire, on May 13, 1935.

Burkitt came to my attention via one of his hymns.  According to my practice, I wrote down his name for future consideration for addition to this, my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.  Learning about him has proven to be quite pleasant, edifying, and more what I had guessed I might find.  That has been an example of serendipity.  Hopefully it has been serendipitous for you too, O reader.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 18, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF BARTHOLOMÉ DE LAS CASAS, “APOSTLE TO THE INDIANS”

THE FEAST OF ARTHUR PENRHYN STANLEY, ANGLICAN DEAN OF WESTMINSTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDWARD WILLIAM LEINBACH, U.S. MORAVIAN MUSICIAN AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF ELIZABETH FERARD, FIRST DEACONESS IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [F. Crawford Burkitt and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of Thomas A. Dooley (January 17)   Leave a comment

dooley

Above:  Dr. Thomas A. Dooley

Image Source = The Catholic Advance (Wichita, Kansas), January 27, 1961, page 5

Accessed via newspapers.com

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

THOMAS ANTHONY DOOLEY, III (JANUARY 17, 1927-JANUARY 18, 1961)

Physician and Humanitarian

++++++++++++++++++++++++++

It must be a source of heartened gratification to realize that in so few years you have accomplished so much for the good of distant peoples and have inspired so many others to work for all humanity.

–Telegram from President Dwight D. Eisenhower to Thomas A. Dooley, January 17, 1961; quoted in The Catholic Advance (Wichita, Kansas), January 27, 1961, page 5 (accessed via newspapers.com)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The name of Thomas Anthony Dooley, III, came to my attention via In Faith and Love (1968), an adult Christian education resource from The Methodist Church (1939-1968), a predecessor of The United Methodist Church.  (I find some wonderful books in thrift stores!)  In Faith and Love, by Orlo Strunk, Jr., tells the stories of a few great and relatively contemporary Christians.  It is an example of mainline Protestant hagiography, minus the feast dates.  As I read Strunk’s account of Dooley’s life, I was impressed by our saint.  I also noticed a gaping hole in the narrative.  Why did Dooley leave the U.S. Navy in the middle 1950s?  As I consulted other sources, some of them openly homophobic, I learned of the part of Dooley’s biography that Strunk omitted.  One cannot understand the life of Thomas A. Dooley properly without grasping that he was a guilt-ridden homosexual struggling against homophobia and with himself.

Dooley, born in St. Louis, Missouri, on January 17, 1927, grew up in a devout Roman Catholic family.  His parents, Thomas A. Dooley, Jr. (1885-1948), and Agnes Wise Dooley (1895-1964), took him to Mass frequently led prayers at home, and taught him to be aware of the needs of others, especially the less fortunate.  Our saint, as a young man, enjoyed music, boats, horses, and travel.  His father’s high school graduation present to him was a trip to Mexico.  There Dooley traveled through the countryside on a burro and wanted to help the poor people of the mountain villages.

Dooley understood that he had responsibilities to his country and his fellow human beings, especially the less fortunate.  In 1943, at the age of 16 years, he matriculated at the University of Notre Dame.  He left the following year, to become a Naval medical corpsman, after learning of the injury of his brother Earle, in the U.S. Army in Europe.  Our saint learned subsequently of Earle’s death in Germany.  The U.S. Navy discharged Dooley after V-J Day.  Our saint visited Lourdes, France, in 1948, as he struggled with the fact that he was, according to many doctors, too sensitive to be a physician.  Dooley resumed his studies, enrolling at the St. Louis University School of Medicine, becoming an M.D. in 1953.

Dooley returned to the U.S. Navy, which commissioned him a Lieutenant and assigned him to the naval hospital at Camp Pendleton, California, then, in 1953, as the Chief Medical Officer of the U.S.S. Montague.  In that capacity our saint assisted in the evacuation of Haiphong, Vietnam, and saw more than 600,000 refugees suffer.  Dooley, who became aware of his lack of training in building a refugee camp, learned the Vietnamese language and performed surgeries on victims of atrocities Communists had committed.  The events of 1954 and 1955 haunted our saint.

The U.S. Navy discharged Dooley because of his homosexuality yet attempted to cover up the cause of his separation from military service.  Our saint could have simply returned home and pursued a lucrative career, but he chose to return to the former French Indochina as a medical missionary.  As Dr. Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) told Dooley,

The significance of a man, Tom, is not in what he attains, but in what he longs to attain.

Our saint traveled to Laos in 1956.  There he worked as a doctor with Operation Laos and helped to found Medical International Cooperation (MEDICO).  Dooley also wrote three books:  Deliver Us from Evil (1956), The Edge of Tomorrow (1958), and The Night They Burned Down the Mountain (1960).  “Dr. America,” as many Laotians called him, raised funds for MEDICO.  His donors included President Dwight D. Eisenhower.  Dooley was also sensitive toward his patients, sometimes even playing the piano for them.  He combined humanitarian concern, mere human decency, and Cold War politics to finance his good works.

In 1959 Dooley returned to the United States for the treatment of his melanoma.  The University of Notre Dame awarded him an honorary degree in 1960, shortly before his death.  According to a Gallup poll in 1961, the only two people more respected by Americans were President Eisenhower and Pope John XXIII.  Dooley died in New York City on January 18, 1961, one day after his thirty-fourth birthday.  Later that year the U.S. Congress awarded Dooley a posthumous Congressional Gold Medal and President John F. Kennedy cited his example when launching the Peace Corps.

Despite his piety and humanitarian works, Dooley’s reputation among some people has become or remained negative.  The reason for this reality is homophobia.  On the other hand, some have criticized Dooley for not having been an out and proud homosexual.  Our saint was a man of his time in certain regards.  He was also exactly what God created him to be.

The legacy of Dr. Dooley is alive.  Dooley Intermed International helps refugees in several countries and emphasizes preventive medicine and self-help projects.  The Dr. Tom Dooley Society is an organization for medical alumni of the University of Notre Dame dedicated to global service to humanity.  Finally, the Gay and Lesbian Alumni of Notre Dame and St. Mary’s gives the Thomas A. Dooley Award, which

honors individuals who, through their faith-based background, have demonstrated personal courage, compassion, and commitment to advance the human and civil rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans.

Dooley loved his neighbors as he loved himself.  He also understood that many of his neighbors lived as far away from his home in St. Louis as Vietnam and Laos.  His Roman Catholicism inspired his humanitarian works.  He was indeed a saint.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 23, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JOHN KENNETH PFOHL, SR., U.S. MORAVIAN BISHOP; HIS WIFE, HARRIET ELIZABETH “BESSIE” WHITTINGTON PFOHL, U.S. MORAVIAN MUSICIAN; AND THEIR SON, JAMES CHRISTIAN PFOHL, SR., U.S. MORAVIAN MUSICIAN

THE FEAST OF CASPAR FRIEDRICH NACHTENHOFER, GERMAN LUTHERAN MUSICIAN, LITURGIST, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT CLEMENT OF ROME, BISHOP

THE FEAST OF SAINT COLUMBAN, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++