Archive for the ‘Babylon 5-Crusade’ Tag

Impact   Leave a comment

Or, Why We Should Influence and Affect Instead

I take the English language seriously.  When I see a

10 Items of Less

sign in a store, for example, I struggle to resist the temptation to comment that the sign should read

10 Items or Fewer.

Sometimes I choose not to resist the temptation.  I object to confusing “further” and “farther.”  It is not outside my experience to erupt into profanities in private while reading students’ writing in which they have used “it’s” (the contraction of “it is”) in lieu of “its” (a singular possessive pronoun).  I roll my eyes when I hear people say “very unique” of “most unique,” for degrees of uniqueness do not exist.  (For that matter, no woman is ever “very pregnant,” for degrees of pregnancy do not exist either.)  I understand the distinction between the subjective and objective cases well enough to realize that it is whom one knows, not who one knows, that matters.  Oxymorons such as “instant classic” and “new tradition” lead me to conclude that some people do not understand classics and traditions are old-certainly neither instant nor new.  And I cringe when I read or hear “impact” as a verb, in lieu of “influence” or “affect.”  I am a beneficiary of some excellent English teachers.

I realize that language changes.  I know, for example, that “prevent” used to mean “precede.”  It makes sense, after all; the combination of “pre” and “event” gives us “prevent.”  Yet I am no postmodernist.  No, I am an unabashed modernist (in the sense of Enlightenment modernism) with regard to language and other matters.  I affirm that words mean what they mean.  So, for example, when I consult the Merriam-Webster website and read that, according to those linguistic lords, I may use “literally” hyperbolically to mean “figuratively” without being incorrect, I object.  Most dictionaries describe, not proscribe, the meaning of words, as popular culture determines those definitions.  My inner linguistic Federalist chafes against the Jeffersonian Republican character of most dictionaries.

In old dictionaries “impact,” as a verb, means (A) to become wedged in somewhere and (B) to collide with something or someone.  Note, O reader, the physicality of the verb.  The main example of the correct use of “impact” as a verb in media that comes to my mind comes from Endgame (1997), an episode of Babylon 5 (1994-1998).   Captain James, aboard the E.A.S. Agamemnon during the climactic battle against forces loyal to the dictatorial Earth Alliance President William Morgan Clark, shouts that missiles are

impacting on all sides.

I seldom hear and read correct uses of “impact” as a verb, however.

During the last few years I have noticed with much dismay and gnashing of teeth the increased frequency of people using “impact” as a verb (and, by extension, the gerund “impacting”) in popular culture, in casual conversation, on National Public Radio and the British Broadcasting Corporation, on academic websites, in job descriptions, and in academic writing.  In more than one book (of mine) I have crossed through “impact” and written “influence” or “affect.”  I have also written an anti-impact policy into my college syllabi.  Based on essays I have graded, I have concluded that many students have not read my syllabi.

I enjoy a certain elegance of language and encourage a healthy respect for the English tongue.  The evisceration of English that I have been witnessing for years disturbs me.  Perhaps the best I can do is (A) to encourage the proper use of language and (B) to model that use of English.  I do the best I can.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 30, 2017 COMMON ERA

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This is post #1500 of SUNDRY THOUGHTS.

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Posted June 30, 2017 by neatnik2009 in Language

Tagged with , ,

Feast of Paul Jones and John Nevin Sayre (September 4)   Leave a comment

Apotheosis of War

Above:  The Apotheosis of War, by Vasily Vereschchagin

Image in the Public Domain

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PAUL JONES (NOVEMBER 25, 1880-SEPTEMBER 4, 1941)

Episcopal Bishop of Utah and Peace Activist

colleague of 

JOHN NEVIN SAYRE (FEBRUARY 4, 1884-SEPTEMBER 13, 1977)

Episcopal Priest and Peace Activist

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INTRODUCTION

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The Episcopal Church commemorates the life of Bishop Paul Jones on September 4.  On this, my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, I do the same and add to the feast his colleague and fellow Episcopalian, John Nevin Sayre.

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PAUL JONES (I)

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Jones, born on November 25, 1880, at Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, was a cradle Episcopalian and a son of a priest.  After graduating from Yale University he attended the Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Massachusetts.  There, in 1906, Jones heard the Bishop Franklin S. Spalding, of the Missionary District of Utah, speak of the challenges of evangelizing in the Mormon-dominated state.  Our saint volunteered to serve in Utah.  And he did, at St. John’s, Logan.  In 1914 Jones became the archdeacon in the missionary district.  Later that year he succeeded Spalding as bishop.  Our saint built up the diocese well during his tenure (1914-1918).

Jones got into deep trouble for speaking out based on his conscience.  He was a pacifist, for he was convinced that Jesus disapproved of settling conflicts violently.  Jones also argued for recognizing the moral validity of conscientious objection to war.  Both church and society, he insisted, should respect the choice not to engage in violence.  All of this was politically dangerous to advocate for in the United States in 1917 and 1918, a time when much of the population contracted war fever.  In the realm of the ridiculous, Dachshunds became Liberty Hounds, German Shepherds became Alsacian Shepherds, and frankfurters became hot dogs, among other examples of renaming dog breeds and food products.  The city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, banned the performance of the music of Ludwig von Beethoven, who had been dead for 90 years.  Besides, given the composer’s political position regarding Emperor Napoleon I (he considered Bonaparte’s self-promotion a betrayal of principles), would Beethoven have supported German imperialism in 1914-1918, had he been alive?  Reason be damned, this was wartime panic and intolerance.  States and the federal government passed laws suspending the freedom of speech and redress of the government.  Certain opponents of U.S. involvement in World War I went to prison for their nonviolent activities, such as giving speeches and distributing leaflets.  (The First Amendment to the United States Constitution be damned also, apparently.)  Jones had to contend with false allegations of being pro-German and anti-American.  He got off relatively lightly, though; the Episcopal House of Bishops forced him to resign from both the Missionary District of Utah and the House of Bishops.  Years later he got to rejoin the House of Bishops yet without a vote therein.

Jones served as the executive secretary of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, devoted to the nonviolent resolution of conflicts, from 1919 to 1929.  A colleague there was John Nevin Sayre.

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JOHN NEVIN SAYRE (I)

With Paul Jones

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Sayre came from a distinguished family.  He, born on February 4, 1884, at South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, was a grandson of John Williamson Nevin (1803-1886), the great German Reformed minister and Mercersburg theologian.  Our saint’s aunt was Alice Nevin (1837-1925), who contributed much to the life of the Reformed Church in the United States and to the civil life of Lancaster, Pennsylvania.  Sayre’s mother was Martha Finley Nevin (1824-1917), daughter of John Williamson Nevin and sister of Alice.  Our saint’s father was Robert Heysham Sayre (1844-1917), the manager of the Bethlehem Iron Works and the founder of the Sayre Mining and Manufacturing Company.  Sayre’s brother was Francis Bowes Sayre, Sr. (1885-1972), an attorney and diplomat.  Francis Sr. was a professor at Harvard Law School (1917-1923), the Advisor in Foreign Affairs to the King of Siam (1923-1925), the U.S. Ambassador to Siam (1925-1932), the Director of the Harvard Institute of Criminal Law (1932-1933), the U.S. Assistant Secretary of State (1933-1939), the High Commissioner of the Philippines (1939-1942), and the U.S. Representative to the United Nations Leadership Council (1947-1952).  In 1913 he married Jessie Woodrow Wilson (died in 1933), daughter of President (Thomas) Woodrow Wilson (in office 1913-1921).  Through Francis Sr. our saint was able to gain access to prominent people, such as President Wilson, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (in office 1933-1945), General Douglas MacArthur (1880-1964), and Emperor Hirohito (reigned 1926-1989).

Our saint was a well-educated man.  He graduated from Princeton University (B.A., 1907) and the Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Massachusetts (B.D., 1911).  He also studied at the Union Theological Seminary, New York, New York (1908-1910) and the University of Marburg, Germany (1913-1914).  Sayre also taught at Princeton University (1911-1912) and at Boone University, Wuchang, China (1913).

Sayre became a pacifist in 1914.  He agreed with Jones that warfare was incompatible with the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.  Sayre, Assistant Rector (1915-1916) then Rector (1916-1919) of Christ Church, Suffern, New York, found his congregation to be less than fully supportive of his pacifism.  He resigned and helped to found Brookwood School (1919-1921), where he taught nonviolence for two years.  In 1921, when Brookwood School became Brookwood Labor College, an experimental residential two-year institution for workers, he transferred to the U.S. branch of the Fellowship of Reconciliation.  (He had helped to found that branch six years earlier.)  Sayre edited The World Tomorrow from 1922 to 1924 and served as the organization’s associate secretary from 1924 to 1935, serving under Jones during part of that time.  Sayre traveled the world as he sought to resolve conflicts nonviolently.  In 1927, for example, he, via Francis Sr., gained access to U.S. senators and State Department officials and thereby succeeded in halting the planned U.S. bombing of innocent civilians during a conflict in Nicaragua.

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PAUL JONES (II)

With John Nevin Sayre

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Jones spent his final years as the chaplain of Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio.  He also functioned as a spiritual advisor to students and a member of the faculty, as a well as a traveling speaker.  Other causes for which our saint advocated were economic justice (from a Christian Socialist perspective) and civil rights for African Americans.  In 1939 he and Sayre helped to found the Episcopal Pacifist Fellowship (now the Episcopal Peace Fellowship).  Toward the end of his life Jones helped to resettle European Jews fleeing the Nazis.  He died of multiple myeloma at Yellow Springs on September 4, 1941.  He was 60 years old.

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JOHN NEVIN SAYRE (II)

With Francis Bowes Sayre, Jr.

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Sayre, active in pacifist activism for most of his life, spent most of that life with Kathleen Whitaker, also his partner in activism.  She and her mother, pacifists, had emigrated from England in 1916.  Kathleen became the second Mrs. Sayre in 1922; the marriage ended when Sayre died in 1977.  (Sayre had married his first wife, Helen Augusta Bangs, on June 28, 1910.  She died two years and two days later.)  Other organizations through which the Sayres worked for peace and reconciliation included, of course, the Episcopal Pacifist/Peace Fellowship, the National Peace Conference and the International Fellowship of Witness.  Their pacifism translated, not surprisingly, into opposition to the Vietnam War.

Other favored causes included helping conscientious objectors in Europe and the United States during World War II, sparing the lives and facilitating the release and repatriation of Japanese prisoners of war after that conflict, advocating for civil liberties, and working for civil rights for African Americans.  Sayre died at South Hyack, New York, on September 13, 1977.  He was 93 years old.

A nephew, Francis Bowes Sayre, Jr. (1915-2008), a grandson of Woodrow Wilson, became an Episcopal priest, and from 1951 to 1978, the Dean of Washington National Cathedral.  True to his family heritage, he opposed Jim Crow, McCarthyism, and the Vietnam War.

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CONCLUSION

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As time moved on, so did ecclesiastical institutions.  The Lambeth Conference of 1958 approved the following resolutions:

Resolution 101 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations 

The Church’s Work of Reconciliation The Conference urges all members of the Anglican Communion to further the ministry of reconciliation by: (a) developing deeper understanding and fellowship with churchmen of every land; (b) extending the use of clergy and lay workers in lands other than their own, the exchange of teachers and seminarians, and the participation by lay visitors in the Church life of the countries they visit; (c) the general use of the Anglican Cycle of Prayer to undergird this wider sense of community; (d) participation everywhere in the wider community of all Christian people in the ecumenical opportunities open to them.

Resolution 102 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations – Christian Citizenship

The Conference calls upon all Christian people to recognise their duty of exercising to the full their responsibility as citizens in the national and international policies of their governments.

Resolution 103 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations – Christian Citizenship

The Conference calls upon all Christian people to strive by the exercise of mutual understanding, calm reason, and constant prayer, to reconcile all those who are involved in racial, political, economic, or other conflicts.

Resolution 104 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations – The Rights of Men and Nations

The Conference declares that the Church is not to be identified with any particular political or social system, and calls upon all Christians to encourage their governments to respect the dignity and freedom of people within their own nations and the right of people of other nations to govern themselves.

Resolution 105 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations – Sharing Material Resources

The Conference draws attention to the widespread poverty in many parts of the world; it notes with thankfulness the measures taken to help under-developed countries to become self-supporting, and calls upon Christians in more favoured lands to use their influence to encourage their governments in the task of relieving poverty by a generous sharing of their material and technical resources with those in need.

Resolution 106 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations – Modern Warfare and Christian Responsibility

The Conference reaffirms that war as a method of settling international disputes is incompatible with the teaching and example of our Lord Jesus Christ, and declares that nothing less than the abolition of war itself should be the goal of the nations, their leaders, and all citizens. As an essential step towards achieving this goal the Conference calls upon Christians to press through their governments, as a matter of the utmost urgency, for the abolition by international agreement of nuclear bombs and other weapons of similar indiscriminate destructive power, the use of which is repugnant to the Christian conscience. To this end governments should accept such limitations of their own sovereignty as effective control demands. The Conference further urges the governments of the leading nations of the world to devote their utmost efforts at once to framing a comprehensive international disarmament treaty, which shall also provide for the progressive reduction of armed forces and conventional armaments to the minimum necessary for the maintenance of internal security and the fulfilment of the obligations of states to maintain peace and security in accordance with the United Nations Charter.

Resolution 107 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations – Modern Warfare and Christian Responsibility

The Conference calls Christians to subject to intense prayer and study their attitudes to the issues involved in modern warfare, and urges the Church to continue to consult regularly with scientists and political leaders about the many problems of ethics and conscience which arise from advances in nuclear research.

Resolution 108 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations – The United Nations

The Conference affirms the need for strengthening the United Nations and to this end: (a) urges that serious consideration be given to the revision of its Charter, the more effective use of, and respect for, the existing processes of international justice, and to the creation of adequate means for enforcing its decisions; (b) commends wholeheartedly the work done under the aegis of the United Nations, whereby the skills and resources of member nations are made available for the benefit of the whole of humanity; (c) recommends that all Church people be asked to pray for God’s blessing upon the officers and declared purposes of the United Nations; (d) urges that all Church people be asked to encourage community study regarding the constitution, the plans, and the needs of the United Nations.

Resolution 109 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations – The United Nations

The Conference draws attention to the work of the Committee of the Churches on International Affairs (within the World Council of Churches) and urges Anglicans to support its efforts to bring an informed Christian opinion to bear on international issues.

Resolution 110 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations – Condemnation of Racial Discrimination

The Conference affirms its belief in the natural dignity and value of every man, of whatever colour or race, as created in the image of God. In the light of this belief the Conference affirms that neither race nor colour is in itself a barrier to any aspect of that life in family and community for which God created all men. It therefore condemns discrimination of any kind on the grounds of race or colour alone. The Conference would urge that in multi-racial societies members of all races shall be allowed: (a) a fair and just share in the government of their country; (b) a fair and just share in the control, development, and rewards of the natural resources of their country, including advancement to the highest level of attainment; (c) the right to associate freely in worship, in education, in industry, in recreation, and in all other departments of the common life.

Resolution 111 The Reconciling of Conflicts Between and Within Nations – The Church in an Industrial Age

The Conference urges the provinces of the Anglican Communion to give special study to the task, strategy, and ministry of the Church within industrial society, and by the use of bold and imaginative experiments to strengthen the impact of the Christian faith upon the whole life and pattern of industry.

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I am not a pacifist.  I have tried to become one, but I have not been able to, pardon the term, reconcile certain uncomfortable realities with idealism.  Sometimes the best choice is a bad one, albeit the least or lesser bad choice.  I write this post on the anniversary of the dropping of the first atomic bomb in 1945.  As much as I deplore the human costs (including to innocent civilians) inherent in that act, I also know that the human costs (including to innocent civilians) would have been far worse had an invasion of the Japanese home islands occurred.  Forcing Japanese surrender also kept Soviet troops out of Japan.  President Harry Truman made the decision he had to make; he chose the lesser of two evils when no good option was available.  I also recognize the fact that reconciling with, not antagonizing, Japan after World War II made the world a better place for Allies and Japanese alike.  I wonder world history would have been different had the victorious Allies been kind to Germany and nicer to Japan at Versailles Palace in 1919.

Although I am not a pacifist, I refuse to condemn those who are.  They remind the rest of us of the importance of seeking peace–not just the absence of conflict, but the reality of reconciliation.  “An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth” may have been originally a moral step forward, insofar as its purpose was to curtail violence, but reconciliation is superior.  As Delenn, the Minbari Ambassador to Babylon 5, said in Passing Through Gethsemane (1995), one of my favorite episodes of Babylon 5 (1994-1998), “An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth” leaves many people blind and toothless.  Is it not better for all of us to retain our eyes and teeth and to strive for peace, or at least the absence of conflict?  Some violence is necessary, sadly, but most of it is morally unjustifiable.  Frequently the motivation for violence is revenge or pride, not self-defense.  Even when violence is in self-defense, it might damage the one who commits it.  Wildred Owen (who died a week before the armistice in 1918, wrote a poem in the voice of two soldiers.  One soldiers tells the other:

I am the enemy you killed, my friend.

I knew you in the dark; for so you frowned

Yesterday through me as you jabbed and killed.

Let us sleep now….

Also, given the long tradition of people from various religions (including, unfortunately, Christianity, named after the executed Prince of Peace) engaging in violence at the proverbial drop of a hat, from antiquity to the present day, I derive comfort from the fact many faithful people seek to incite nonviolence in the name of God.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 6, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE TRANSFIGURATION

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Merciful God, you sent your beloved Son to preach peace to those who are far off and to those who are near:

Raise up in this and every land witnesses who, after the examples of your servants

Paul Jones and John Nevin Sayre,

will stand firm in proclaiming the Gospel of the Prince of Peace,

our Savior Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with you

and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Malachi 2:17-3:5

Psalm 76

1 Peter 3:8-14a

John 8:31-32

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 561

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Feast of Dag Hammarskjold (September 18)   Leave a comment

1953 - Dag Hammarskjöld, generalsekreterare FN Foto: Pressens Bild  Kod: 190 COPYRIGHT PRESSENS BILD

1953 – Dag Hammarskjöld, generalsekreterare FN
Foto: Pressens Bild Kod: 190
COPYRIGHT PRESSENS BILD

Above:  Dag Hammarskjold

Image in the Public Domain

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DAG HJALMAR AGNE CARL HAMMARSKJOLD (JULY 29, 1905-SEPTEMBER 18, 1961)

Secretary-General of the United Nations

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Give me a pure heart that I may see Thee,

A humble heart that I may hear Thee,

A heart of love that I may serve Thee,

A heart of faith that I may abide in Thee.

–Dag Hammarskjold in Markings (published in 1963)

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In this post I do something I seldom do.  I refer you, O reader, to a biography of the saint at another website and proceed directly to reflections.

Dag Hammarskjold operated based on Christian values he learned in his Lutheran family in Sweden.  He internalized the importance of building up “the least among us” and of seeking peace.  He even died while on a peace mission.

Such people tend to attract both admirers and detractors, both for their goals and their methods.  The question of methods is a procedural one, but such goals should win universal acclaim.  Yet they do not.

Greatness is never appreciated in youth, called pride in middle age, dismissed in old age, and reconsidered in death.  Because we cannot tolerate greatness in our midst we do all we can to destroy it.

–Lady Morella in Point of No Return (1996), an episode of Babylon 5

The purpose of politics should be to unify diverse groups of people and seek the common good, not to pit groups against each other and propagate prejudice and ignorance, often in the name of making one’s country great again.  One can consider the legacy of Hammarskjold and recognize an example of constructive politics, not, as an unfortunately accurate joke indicates, many bloodsucking creatures.  One can learn from our saint the value and imperative of love, not hatred, and of faith, not fear.

Every day and at home, we are warned about the enemy.  Is it the alien?  Well, we are all alien to one another.  Is it the one who believes differently than we do?  No, oh no, my friends.  The enemy is fear.  The enemy is ignorance.  The enemy is the one who tells you that you must hate that which is different.  Because, in the end, that hate will turn on you.  And that same hate will destroy you.

–The Reverend Will Dexter in And the Rock Cried Out, No Hiding Place (1996), an episode of Babylon 5

The Right Reverend Robert C. Wright, the Episcopal Bishop of Atlanta, encourages us in the Diocese of Atlanta to

love as Jesus loves.

I detect that ethic in the life of Hammarskjold, who had both admirers and detractors in life and retains both in death.  Critics will always be present among us.  When–not if–someone criticizes you, O reader, may it be for works of righteousness that benefit people and glorify God.  May the criticism reflect badly on the critic, not you.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 14, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT BASIL THE GREAT, FATHER OF EASTERN MONASTICISM

THE FEAST OF DOROTHY FRANCES BLOMFIELD GURNEY, ENGLISH POET AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF HANS ADOLF BRORSON, DANISH LUTHERAN BISHOP, HYMN WRITER, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT METHODIUS I OF CONSTANTINOPLE, PATRIARCH

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Holy and righteous God, you created us in your image.

Grant us grace to contend fearlessly against evil and to make no peace with oppression.

Help us, like your servant Dag Hammarskjold, to work for justice among people and nations,

to the glory of your name, through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Guide Post: Babylon 5 (2263 and Later)   Leave a comment

sleeping-in-light-08

Above:  The Destruction of Babylon 5

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River of Souls:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/14/babylon-5-the-river-of-souls-1998/

The Legend of the Rangers:  To Live and Die in Starlight:

Skipped

A Call to Arms:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/15/babylon-5-a-call-to-arms-1999/

Crusade:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/16/babylon-5-crusade-1999/

The Lost Tales:  Voices in the Dark:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/18/babylon-5-the-lost-tales-voices-in-the-dark-2007/

In the Beginning:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/20/babylon-5-in-the-beginning-1998/

War Without End, Parts I and II:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/babylon-5-war-without-end-parts-i-and-ii-1996/

Sleeping in Light:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/21/babylon-5-sleeping-in-light-1998/

The Deconstruction of Falling Stars:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/16/babylon-5-the-deconstruction-of-falling-stars-1997/

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Guide Post: Babylon 5 (2262)   Leave a comment

no-compromises-01

Above:  Title Card for the Fifth Season of Babylon 5

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The Deconstruction of Falling Stars:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/16/babylon-5-the-deconstruction-of-falling-stars-1997/

No Compromises:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/17/babylon-5-no-compromises-1998/

The Very Long Night of Londo Mollari:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/19/babylon-5-the-very-long-night-of-londo-mollari-1998/

The Paragon of Animals:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/27/babylon-5-the-paragon-of-animals-1998/

A View from the Gallery:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/27/babylon-5-a-view-from-the-gallery-1998/

Learning Curve:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/10/babylon-5-learning-curve-1998/

Day of the Dead:

Skipped

Strange Relations:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/11/babylon-5-strange-relations-1998/

Secrets of the Soul:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/19/babylon-5-secrets-of-the-soul-1998/

In the Kingdom of the Blind:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/20/babylon-5-in-the-kingdom-of-the-blind-1998/

A Tragedy of Telepaths:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/22/babylon-5-a-tragedy-of-telepaths-1998-and-phoenix-rising-1998/

Phoenix Rising:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/22/babylon-5-a-tragedy-of-telepaths-1998-and-phoenix-rising-1998/

The Ragged Edge:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/24/babylon-5-the-ragged-edge-1998/

The Corps is Mother, The Corps is Father:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/24/babylon-5-the-corps-is-mother-the-corps-is-father-1998/

Meditations on the Abyss:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/27/babylon-5-meditations-on-the-abyss-1998/

Darkness Ascending:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/babylon-5-darkness-ascending-1998/

All My Dreams, Torn Asunder:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/09/30/babylon-5-and-all-my-dreams-torn-asunder-1998/

Movements of Fire and Shadow:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/03/babylon-5-movements-of-fire-and-shadow-1998/

The Fall of Centauri Prime:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/03/babylon-5-the-fall-of-centauri-prime-1998/

The Wheel of Fire:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/07/babylon-5-the-wheel-of-fire-1998/

Objects in Motion:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/09/babylon-5-objects-in-motion-1998/

Objects at Rest:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/10/11/babylon-5-objects-at-rest-1998/

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Posted August 22, 2013 by neatnik2009 in Babylon 5 Season 5

Tagged with

Guide Post: Babylon 5 (2261)   Leave a comment

babylon-5-battle-of-coriana-vi

Above:  A Scene from the Battle of Coriana VI, the Final Battle of the Shadow War

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The Hour of the Wolf:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/02/babylon-5-the-end-of-the-shadow-war/

Whatever Happened to Mr. Garibaldi?

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/02/babylon-5-the-end-of-the-shadow-war/

The Summoning:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/02/babylon-5-the-end-of-the-shadow-war/

Falling Toward Apotheosis:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/02/babylon-5-the-end-of-the-shadow-war/

The Long Night:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/02/babylon-5-the-end-of-the-shadow-war/

Into the Fire:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/02/babylon-5-the-end-of-the-shadow-war/

Epiphanies:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/03/babylon-5-epiphanies-1997/

The Illusion of Truth:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/04/babylon-5-the-illusion-of-truth-1997/

Thirdspace:

Skipped

Atonement:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/05/babylon-5-atonement-1997/

Racing Mars:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/05/babylon-5-racing-mars-1997/

Lines of Communication:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/08/babylon-5-lines-of-communication-1997/

Conflicts of Interest:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/08/babylon-5-conflicts-of-interest-1997/

Rumors, Bargains and Lies:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/08/babylon-5-rumors-bargains-and-lies-1997/

Moments of Transition:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/08/babylon-5-moments-of-transition-1997/

No Surrender, No Retreat:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/08/babylon-5-no-surrender-no-retreat-1997/

The Exercise of Vital Powers:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/14/babylon-5-the-exercise-of-vital-powers-1997/

The Face of the Enemy:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/14/babylon-5-the-face-of-the-enemy-1997/

Intersections in Real Time:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/14/babylon-5-intersections-in-real-time-1997/

Between the Darkness and the Light:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/14/babylon-5-between-the-darkness-and-the-light-1997/

Endgame:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/16/babylon-5-endgame-1997/

Rising Star:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/08/16/babylon-5-rising-star-1997/

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Posted August 22, 2013 by neatnik2009 in Babylon 5 Movies, Babylon 5 Season 4

Tagged with

Guide Post: Babylon 5 (2260)   Leave a comment

matters-of-honor-04

Above:  The White Star

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Matters of Honor:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/19/babylon-5-matters-of-honor-1995/

Convictions:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/19/babylon-5-convictions-1995/

A Day in the Strife:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/19/babylon-5-a-day-in-the-strife-1995/

Passing Through Gethsemane:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/19/babylon-5-passing-through-gethsemane-1995/

Voices of Authority:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/24/babylon-5-voices-of-authority-1996/

Dust to Dust:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/24/babylon-5-dust-to-dust-1996/

Exogenesis:

Skipped

Messages from Earth:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/25/babylon-5-messages-from-earth-1996/

Point of No Return:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/25/babylon-5-point-of-no-return-1996/

Severed Dreams:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/25/babylon-5-severed-dreams-1996/

Ceremonies of Light and Dark:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/28/babylon-5-ceremonies-of-light-and-dark-1996/

Sic Transit Vir:

Skipped

A Late Delivery from Avalon:

Skipped

Ship of Tears:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/28/babylon-5-ship-of-tears-1996/

Interludes and Examinations:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/28/babylon-5-interludes-and-examinations-1996/

War Without End, Parts I and II:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/babylon-5-war-without-end-parts-i-and-ii-1996/

Walkabout:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/babylon-5-walkabout-1996/

Grey 17 is Missing:

Skipped

And the Rock Cried Out, No Hiding Place:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/29/babylon-5-and-the-rock-cried-out-no-hiding-place-1996/

Shadow Dancing:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/30/babylon-5-shadow-dancing-1996/

Z’ha’dum:

https://neatnik2009.wordpress.com/2010/07/30/babylon-5-zhadum-1996/

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Posted August 22, 2013 by neatnik2009 in Babylon 5 Season 3

Tagged with