Archive for the ‘Chalice Hymnal (1995)’ Tag

Feast of Carl Doving (October 2)   2 comments

Decorah, Iowa 1908

Above:  Panoramic View of Decorah, Iowa, Circa 1908

Copyright Claimant = Brunt & Parman

H116196–U.S. Copyright Office

Image Source = Library of Congress

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CARL DOVING (MARCH 21, 1867-OCTOBER 2, 1937)

Norwegian-American Lutheran Minister and Hymn Translator

I collect hymnals from different denominations for several reasons, including the fact that variety in hymnody interests me.  Variety is the spice of life with regard to hymns, for it guards against a generic, vanilla sensibility in church music and texts thereto.  Hymns which Carl Doving (1867-1937), or, as The Service Hymnal:  A Lutheran Homecoming (2001) misspells his last name, “Dovig,” translated are most likely to appear in hymnals of denominations with a Scandinavian or German heritage, for he rendered texts from Scandinavian and German sources into English.  These English-language texts are products of a finely honed mind, the intellect of a skilled linguist, and a deep trust in God.

Doving, a native of Norddalen, Norway, lived in Norway, South Africa, and the United States of America.  In 1883, ag age 16, he moved to the Natal, South Africa.  There Bishop Nils Astrup, a missionary of the Synod of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (SNELCA), educated him.  Our saint taught at Astrup’s Schreuder Mission, Untunjambili, for a few years before emigrating to the United States at age 23 in 1890.  He studied at Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, for three years, graduating in 1893 then commencing studies at Luther Seminary, St. Paul, Minnesota, from which he graduated in 1896.  Along the way to becoming an ordained minister of the SNELCA then its immediate successor, the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America (1917-1946)/The Evangelical Lutheran Church (1946-1960), wrote three books from his experiences in South Africa:

  1. Billeder fra Syd-Afrika (1892),
  2. Blandt Zuluerne i Syd-Afrika (1894), and
  3. Izihabelelo (1896).

The last book was a volume of Zulu hymns;  the first two were apparently about missionary efforts among the Zulus, according to the scant information I found online.

My sources–books, secondary websites, and primary sources I accessed via Internet searches–helped me to establish some dates in Doving’s career, but not as many as I would have preferred.  I do know the following, however:

  1. Doving served a churches in Red Wing and Montevideo, Minnesota.  He was serving at the congregation in Montevideo in 1902.
  2. In 1903 the SNELCA asked Doving to undertake missionary work among the Zulus.  I have found no indication of his reply.
  3. By 1905 Doving was serving as pastor of the First Scandinavian Lutheran Church, Brooklyn, New York, New York.  He remained there through at least 1911, perhaps 1912.
  4. Doving served as a visiting pastor in Freeborn County, Minnesota, in October and November 1912, overlapping with the long-term tenure of Olof Hanson Smeby (1851-1929) there.  By then Smeby and Doving had concluded their service on the committee for The Lutheran Hymnary (1913).
  5. Doving’s final assignment was as city missionary in Chicago.  This work was well underway by 1916.  One of our saint’s duties was visiting people in hospitals.  Many of them were immigrants not fluent in English.  Fortunately, Doving was fluent in German, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, and Greek.

Preface

Above:  The Conclusion of the Preface to The Lutheran Hymnary (1913)

Scanned from the 1935 edition of The Lutheran Hymnary by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Doving applied his linguistic abilities to translating German and Scandinavian hymns also.  Some sources I consulted indicated that The Lutheran Hymnary contains 32 of his translations.  I counted hymns and wrote down titles, however, and arrived at a different number–37.

Mason City Globe-Citizen, March 6, 1934, page 16 01

Mason City Globe-Citizen, March 6, 1934, page 16 02

Above:  An Article from the Mason City Globe-Citizen, Mason City, Iowa, March 6, 1934, Page 16

Obtained via newspapers.com

The Lutheran Hymnary and users thereof benefited from our saint’s large hymnological library and extensive knowledge of hymnology.  Doving donated that library to Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, in 1934.  Since 1997 the custodian of said library has been Luther Seminary, St. Paul, Minnesota.  That library contains thousands of hymnals and books about hymns in more than 300 languages and from six continents.  The oldest book in the collection dates to the middle 1600s; the most recent volume comes from the early 1900s.  It is a collection which a recognized expert in the field of hymnology assembled.

Carl Doving (D.D., Luther College, Decorah, Iowa, 1931), died at Chicago, Illinois, on October 2, 1937.  His hymn translations survive, and not only in out-of-print hymnbooks.  My survey of germane, current hymnals reveals the following count of Doving texts, in descending order:

  1. Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary (The Evangelical Lutheran Synod, 1996)–16;
  2. Ambassador Hymnal for Lutheran Worship (The Association of Free Lutheran Congregations, 1994)–11;
  3. Christian Worship:  A Lutheran Hymnal (Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod, 1993)–5;
  4. Lutheran Service Book (The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod, 2006)–3;
  5. The Covenant Hymnal:  A Worshipbook (The Evangelical Covenant Church of America, 1996)–2;
  6. The Service Book:  A Lutheran Homecoming (unofficial, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, 2001)–2;
  7. Celebrating Grace Hymnal (Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, 2010)–1;
  8. Chalice Hymnal (Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 1995)–1;
  9. Evangelical Lutheran Worship (Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, 2006)–1;
  10. Moravian Book of Worship (Moravian Church in America, 1995)–1;
  11. The New Century Hymnal (United Church of Christ, 1995)–1;
  12. The Seventh-day Adventist Hymnal (Seventh-day Adventist Church, 1985)–1;
  13. Trinity Hymnal–Baptist Edition (Reformed Baptist, 1995)–1; and
  14. Trinity Hymnal–Revised Edition (Orthodox Presbyterian Church and Presbyterian Church in America, 1990)–1.

I checked many other current hymnals in my collection and found no Carl Doving texts in them.

The top two hymnals on the list come from denominations with a dominant Norwegian heritage.  The Evangelical Lutheran Synod formed in opposition to the merger which created the Norwegian Lutheran Church of America (1917-1946)/The Evangelical Lutheran Church (1946-1960), which merged into The American Lutheran Church (1960-1987).  The Association of Free Lutheran Congregations is the remnant of The Lutheran Free Church, which merged into The American Lutheran Church (1960-1987) in 1963.  The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America also has a strong Norwegian heritage.

Denominations with strong German roots include the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod, The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the Moravian Church in America, and the United Church of Christ.

The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America has strong Swedish and Danish roots, as well as Icelandic and Finnish heritages.  Hymnals of Swedish and Danish immigrant denominations had a stronger Scandinavian hymnody than non-ethnic U.S. Lutheran hymnbooks have had, beginning with the Service Book and Hymnal (1958).  The Evangelical Covenant Church of America has Swedish immigrant roots.

The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod has an ethnic Finnish constituency also.

Our saint left a fine legacy, one which continues to benefit people.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 29, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS BOSA OF YORK, JOHN OF BEVERLEY, WILFRID THE YOUNGER, AND ACCA OF HEXHAM, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS

THE FEAST OF SAINT CATHERINE OF SIENNA, ROMAN CATHOLIC NUN

THE FEAST OF TIMOTHY REES, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LLANDAFF

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Carl Doving)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Posted April 29, 2015 by neatnik2009 in October 2, Saints of 1870-1879, Saints of 1880-1889, Saints of 1890-1899, Saints of 1900-1909, Saints of 1910-1919, Saints of 1920-1929, Saints of 1930-1939

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Feast of Ebenezer Elliott (March 17)   1 comment

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Above:  The Great Stack, Sheffield (1909), by Joseph Pennell (1857-1926)

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-USZ62-22370

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EBENEZER ELLIOTT (MARCH 17, 1781-DECEMBER 1, 1849)

“The Corn Law Rhymer”

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This businessman author made himself a voice for the inarticulate cry of the downtrodden.  His hymns should arouse all Christians to a realization that in God’s sight persons are of more value than property.

–William Chalmers Covert and Calvin Weiss Laufer, eds., Handbook to The Hymnal (Presbyterian Board of Christian Education, 1935), page 394

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I am convinced that if we are to get on the right side of the world revolution, we as a nation must undergo a radical revolution of values.  We must rapidly begin the shift from a “thing-oriented” society to a “person-oriented” society.  When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights, are considered more important than the giant triplets of racism, materialism, and militarism are incapable of being conquered.

–The Reverend Doctor Martin Luther King, Jr., Riverside Church, New York, New York, April 4, 1967; quoted in James Melvin Washington, ed., A Testament of Hope:  The Essential Writings and Speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr. (San Francisco, CA:  HarperCollins, 1986; paperback, 1991), page 240

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Where injustice rules as tyrant,

give us courage, God, to dare

live our dreams of transformation.

Make our lives incarnate prayer.

–O. I. Cricket Harrison, 1988; revised in 1993; from Hymn #658, Chalice Hymnal (1995)

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Some background information is crucial to understanding the politics of our saint.

In 1815 the Tory-controlled Government of Great Britain passed the Corn Law while starving people protested outside the Halls of Parliament.  This law restricted the importation of inexpensive corn, benefiting some while harming many others.  Especially hard hit were poor people.  A peaceful protest against the Corn Law at Manchester in 1819 ended violently when soldiers attacked the crowd, which included many women and children.  Four hundred suffered severe injuries and eleven people–including one child–died.  This became a notorious incident and the cause of much political discontent, but the Government cracked down on dissent, making large public gatherings almost impossible and cracking down on the liberal press.  Law and order triumphed over social reform.

The Government finally repealed the Corn Law in 1846 due to pressure from the Irish Potato Famine.  In the meantime, people had suffered needless burdens of preventable hunger as the Government and businesses conspired to keep wages low and food prices high.  Opposition to such injustice had continued, as the Anti-Corn Law League had formed in 1838 and Ebenezer Elliott had written against the bread tax.

The family of Ebenezer Elliott (1781-1849), born at Yorkshire, had suffered because of the Corn Law and similar measures.  Although he was a conservative by temperament, the food-and-wage policies of the Tory Party (and later of the Conservative Party) pushed him into liberal politics.  Our saint, an ironmonger by profession, spent most of his life in Sheffield, a site of many abuses of industrialization.  (The reference to “dark Satanic mills” in “Jerusalem” was no exaggeration.)  On the side Elliott became a bard of the poor, publishing social protest poems in the local press and helping to build support for the repeal of the bread tax in 1846.

By accident one of his texts, “When Wilt Thou Save the People?,” published posthumously in an 1850 volume, became a hymn.  The text remains relevant.

May the faithful example of Ebenezer Elliott remind us of our responsibility to condemn injustice.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 19, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ANNE HUTCHINSON, REBELLIOUS PURITAN

THE FEAST OF BLAISE PASCAL, MATHEMATICIAN AND ROMAN CATHOLIC THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN EUDES, FOUNDER OF THE CONGREGATION OF JESUS AND MARY

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For Further Reading:

http://www.historyhome.co.uk/people/elliott.htm

http://spenserians.cath.vt.edu/AuthorRecord.php?&recordid=33382

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Holy and righteous God, you created us in your image.

Grant us grace to contend fearlessly against evil and to make no peace with oppression.

Help us, like your servant Ebenezer Elliott, to work for justice among people and nations,

to the glory of your name, through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Revised on December 23, 2016

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Feast of Frederick Pratt Green (October 22)   Leave a comment

Above:  Logo of the Methodist Church of Great Britain

FREDERICK PRATT GREEN (SEPTEMBER 2, 1903-OCTOBER 22, 2000)

British Methodist Minister, Poet, and Hymn Writer

Writing about saints which church authorities have recognized as such has a great deal of value, but so does recognizing others upon whom ecclesiastical hierarchies have not bestowed that label.  There are many more deserving people in the latter category than inhabitants of the former.  One way to find the names of non-canonized saints is to consult a hymnal.  That is how I began the process of learning about this saint.

Fred(erick) Pratt Green (“Pratt Green” was his surname) was born near Liverpool in 1903.  His father, for a time a Wesleyan Methodist Local Preacher, owned a leather business.  Pratt Green, who once entertained the possibility of becoming an architect, worked in his father’s business before entering the Wesleyan Methodist ministry in 1924.  The saint started writing hymns in his sixties, giving the world over 300 new hymns before he died.  Earlier in his career Pratt Green had demonstrated his literary skill by means of a play and English translations of poems.

Between The United Methodist Hymnal (1989) and Chalice Hymnal (1995) alone I located the following hymns which Pratt Green wrote:

  1. When In Our Music God is Glorified
  2. For the Fruits of This Creation
  3. Seek the Lord
  4. All My Hope is Firmly Grounded
  5. Christ is the World’s Light
  6. Break Forth, O Beauteous Light (second and third stanzas)
  7. When Jesus Came to Jordan
  8. O Christ, the Healer
  9. To Mock Your Reign, O Dearest Lord
  10. Of All the Spirit’s Gifts to Me
  11. When Our Confidence is Shaken
  12. By Gracious Powers
  13. Whom Shall I Send
  14. The Church of Christ, in Every Age
  15. When the Church of Jesus
  16. How Blest are They Who Trust in Christ
  17. God Is Here
  18. Rejoice in God’s Saints
  19. An Upper Room Did our Lord Prepare
  20. Loving Lord, as Now We Gather
  21. Now It Is Evening
  22. Come, Sing a Song of Harvest

Pratt Green was a learned and liberal man.  He rejected fundamentalism and embraced ecumenism and social concerns.  He studied other religions extensively and read the Meditations of Marcus Aurelius frequently.  Pratt Green’s hymns reflected his theology.

Pratt Green and his wife, Marjorie (died in 1993), moved into Cromwell House Methodist Home for the Aged, Norwich, in 1990.  There he died peacefully on October 22, 2000.  He and his wife had raised Elizabeth Shepherd, daughter of a missionary who had died in India.  Pratt Green had received numerous honors, including an honorary doctorate in Humane Letters (1982) from Emory University and the rank of Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

OCTOBER 5, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE SAINTS AND MARTYRS OF ASIA

THE FEAST OF HARRY EMERSON FOSDICK, NORTHERN BAPTIST PASTOR

THE FEAST OF THE INAUGURATION OF THE UNITED REFORMED CHURCH, 1972 

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring Fred Pratt Green

and all those who with images and words

have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior,

who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns,

one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 728