Archive for the ‘Charles Wesley’ Tag

Feast of John Byrom (September 26)   1 comment

Manchester Cathedral 1903

Above:  Manchester Cathedral, 1903

Image in the Public Domain

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JOHN BYROM (FEBRUARY 29, 1692-SEPTEMBER 26, 1763)

Anglican then Quaker Poet and Hymn Writer

John Byrom was an intriguing man.  He might have been a Jacobite or a double agent for the British government.  The skilled poet with a sharp pen coined the phrase “Tweedledum and Tweedledee” as a satire on the disagreement between composers George Frederick Handel and Giovanni Battista Bononcini.  His literary legacy has survived in everyday speech even as his political tendencies have remained mysterious.

Our saint’s father was Edward Byrom, a linen-draper of Manchester, England.  The future poet studied at Trinity College, Cambridge (B.A., 1711; M.A., 1715) and became a fellow of the college in 1714.  Two years later, however, he resigned because he could not take Holy Orders in good conscience.  From 1716 to 1718 our saint studied medicine in Montpelier, France.  He immersed himself in mystical texts on the side.  He returned to England in 1718 and chose not to practice medicine.  No, he invented and taught a system of shorthand instead.  Byrom taught that system of shorthand to many people and, in 1742, received from Parliament the exclusive right to teach it for twenty-one years.  Among his pupils were John and Charles Wesley, whom he met in 1738 and through whom he converted to Christianity.

Our saint, who inherited the family estates in 1740, when his brother, Edward, died, wrote and published many poems, some of which became hymns.  His nom de plume in The Spectator was “John Shadow.”  The posthumous two-volume collection, Miscellaneous Poems, rolled off the presses in 1773.  His friend, John Wesley, commented on Byrom’s verse, writing that it consisted of

…some of the finest sentiments that ever appeared in the English tongue–some of the noblest truths, expressed with the utmost energy of language and the strongest colors of poetry.

Byrom’s religious life changed over time.  He remained a mystic, but he switched from being a non-juring Anglican (hence the suspicion of being a Jacobite) to being a Quaker later in life.

Byrom’s hymns included “My Spirit Longs for Thee” and a famous Christmas text, “Christians, Awake! Salute the Happy Morn” (1749), which he wrote as a present for his daughter, Dolly.  The full version had fifty-two lines, but The Church Hymnary–Revised Edition (1927) printed only six of them.

Our saint died at Manchester on September 26, 1763.  His grave is in the Byrom Chapel of Manchester Cathedral.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 18, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF DONALD S. ARMENTROUT, U.S. LUTHERAN MINISTER AND SCHOLAR

THE FEAST OF CALVIN WEISS LAUFER, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER AND HYMNODIST

THE FEAST OF ROGER WILLIAMS, FOUNDER OF RHODE ISLAND

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM PENNEFATHER, ANGLICAN PRIEST, HUMANITARIAN, AND HYMN WRITER; AND HIS WIFE, CATHERINE KING PENNEFATHER, HUMANITARIAN AND HYMN WRITER

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

John Byrom and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Ludolph Ernst Schlicht; John Gambold, Sr.; and John Gambold, Jr. (November 4)   3 comments

November 4 Saints

Above:  New Saints for November 4

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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LUDOLPH ERNST SCHLICHT (NOVEMBER 4, 1714-MARCH 14, 1769)

Moravian Minister, Musician, and Hymn Writer

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JOHN GAMBOLD, SR. (APRIL 10, 1711-SEPTEMBER 13, 1771)

British Moravian Bishop, Hymn Writer, and Translator of Hymns

Father of

JOHN GAMBOLD, JR. (NOVEMBER 15, 1760-JUNE 21, 1795)

Moravian Composer

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The previous post in the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days series started with research into one person and led to the addition of six others as well.  This post began with research into one person (Schlicht) and led to two others–a father and a son.  I also found areas of overlap with the previous post in this series.

Ludolph Ernst Schlicht (1714-1769), who attended the seminary at the University of Jena, arrived at Herrnhut, on the estate of Count Nicholas Ludwig von Zinzendorf (1700-1760) near Berthelsdorf, Saxony.  There Schlicht spent most of his time sharing his musical talents with young people.  He joined the Unitas Fratrum in 1739, became an ordained minister three years later, and served congregations in Ireland and England.  Schlicht began to serve the congregation at Bedford, England, in 1753.

Music has long been important in the Moravian Church, so one ought not to find accounts of Moravian clergymen who were also musicians surprising.  Schlicht, a skilled musician, used that skill for the glory of God by playing in worship services.  He also composed hymn texts, anthems, and cantatas.  Among the hymns were “Immanuel, We Sing Thy Praise,” “Lord, Grant Us, Though Deeply Abased,” and, with Bishop John Gambold, Sr. (1711-1771), “Ye Who Called to Christ’s Service Are.”  Schlicht collaborated with Bishop Gambold on the first official British Moravian hymnal, A Collection of Hymns for the Children of God in All Ages, From the Beginning Till Now, Designed Chiefly for the Use of Congregations in Union with the Brethren’s Church (1754).  This hymnal contained 1,055 hymn texts reaching all the way back to the Early Church and as late as the 1700s, including texts by great English hymn writers such as Isaac Watts and Charles Wesley.  Only fifty-one of these hymns came from the Moravian Church prior to its 1727 Renewal.  And, some of my sources indicate, Schlicht probably edited a British hymnal in 1746.  The only book which, according to my research, fit that description was James Hutton‘s private collection, The Tunes for the Hymns in the Collection with Several Translations from the Moravian Hymnbook (1742), with its 1746 supplement.

John Gambold, Sr. (1711-1771), son of the Anglican Vicar of Puncheston, Pembrokeshire, Wales, attended Christ Church, Oxford (B.A, 1730; M.A., 1734), took Holy Orders and served as the Vicar of Stanton Harcourt (1733-1742).  Gambold, who met John Wesley at Oxford, became part of the core group of earliest Methodism.  By 1741, however, he and Wesley had ceased to speak to each other.  (More than one person fell out with Wesley, probably due to the combination of personality clashes and theological disagreements.)  Gambold and Wesley, both whom had Moravian influences, moved in different directions after 1738.  Gambold, who met Count Zinzendorf in 1739, preferred the mysticism of the Greek Church Fathers to Wesley’s style of religion.  Thus it came to pass that Gambold entered the Unitas Fratrum in 1742.

Gambold, from the first British Moravian bishop (as of 1752), left a fine legacy in the realm of hymnody.  He, of course, edited the landmark hymnal of 1754.  Less famous was the 1769 hymnal he edited.  The Bishop also translated twenty-six hymns and wrote eighteen.  A hymn from 1741, as the Hymnal and Liturgies of the Moravian Church (Unitas Fratrum) (1923) contains it, follows:

They who know our Lord indeed,

Find in Him a Friend indeed,

And behold in Jesus’ face

Naught but mercy, truth, and grace.

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They can cast by faith their care

On that Lord who heareth prayer;

And when they to Him draw nigh,

He doth all their wants supply.

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They who Him their Saviour know,

Lowly at His footstool bow;

They to whom His Name is dear,

To offend Him greatly fear.

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O how wondrous is His love,

To all who His goodness prove;

Lord, accept our thanks and praise

For Thy goodness, truth, and grace.

Other hymns included “O Grant Thy Servants,” “They Who Jesus’ Followers Are,” and “What Praise to Thee, My Saviour.”

Bishop Gambold left an impressive literary legacy, which included the following:

  1. The Maryrdom of Saint Ignatius (1740; published posthumously in 1773, with Bishop Benjamin Henry LaTrobe, Sr., as Editor);
  2. Maxims and Theological Ideas (1751);
  3. Sermons; and
  4. The History of Greenland, Volumes I and II, by David Crantz (1767, with Gambold as the Editor and one of the translators).

There were also posthumous collections:

  1. The Works of the Late Rev. John Gambold, A.M. (1789); and
  2. The Poetical Works of the Late Rev. John Gambold, A.M. (1816).

Also, The Oxford Methodists (1873) contains an account of his life on pages 155-200.

Bishop Gambold died at Haverford West, Wales, on September 13, 1771, when his son, John Gambold, Jr. (1760-1795), was two months short of being eleven years old.  John, Jr., went to study in Germany (at the time a geographical, not a political, designation) in 1774, at age fourteen.  There he remained for the rest of his brief life.  He studied at Niesky and Barby.  John, Jr., aspired to become a scholar yet the Church appointed him to teach young people instead.  On the side he composed six keyboard sonatas (published at Leipzig in 1788) and twenty-six vocal pieces.  John, Jr., whose health had always been fragile, died at Barby, Saxony, at age thirty-four.

The process of preparing these posts about saints is a rewarding one.  Along the way I learn of connections between and among people, of some of the circumstances of their lives, of what they did with their lives and strove to do with them, and of their legacies.  In this case the process had led me to some conclusions about these three men.  They were flawed people, of course, but perfection was not an option.  (Who among us is not flawed?)  They agreed and disagreed with others, engaged in interpersonal conflicts, sometimes had irreconcilable differences, had positive relationships also, and tried to walk as closely with God as possible.  To the extent that they succeeded grace made the difference between that and failure.  They also applied their talents to the glory of God.  And more of us ought to know their names and some of their accomplishments.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 7, 2014 COMMON  ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT VICTRICIUS OF ROUEN, ROMAN CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR AND ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF SAINT SIXTUS II, BISHOP OF ROME, AND HIS COMPANIONS, MARTYRS

THE FEAST OF JOHN MASON NEALE, FOUNDER OF THE SISTERHOOD OF SAINT MARGARET

THE FEAST OF MARION HATCHETT, LITURGIST AND EPISCOPAL PRIEST

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring Ludolph Ernst Schlicht; John Gambold, Sr.; John Gambold, Jr.;

and all those who with music or words have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior, who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from the Proper for Artists and Writers, Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 728

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Feast of Johann Olaf Wallin (June 30)   1 comment

johan_olof_wallin_femtio_portrc3a4tt_af_ryktbara_svenskar

Above:  Archbishop Wallin

Image in the Public Domain

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JOHANN OLAF WALLIN (OCTOBER 15, 1779-JUNE 30, 1839)

Archbishop of Uppsala and Hymn Writer

Johann Olaf Wallin, or as I have also seen his name spelled, Johan Olof Wallin, is to Swedish Lutheran hymnody what people such as Charles Wesley, Isaac Watts, and Philip Doddridge are to traditional English hymnody.

Wallin, born at Stora Tuna, Delarna province, Sweden, was the son of a sergeant major in the Army.  Our saint became a scholar, earning his doctoral degree from the University of Uppsala at age twenty-four.  Wallin, ordained in 1806, became the theological assistant at Karlberg War College the following year.  In 1808 he became lecturer at the college and pastor at Solna.  Four years later our saint became pastor of the Adolf Frederik Church, Stockholm.  In 1818 he became Dean of Vasteras.  Three years later Wallin became pastor at Storkyrkan.  In 1824 he became a bishop (of which diocese I cannot determine).  After thirteen years our saint rose to Archbishop of Uppsala, the Primate of the Church of Sweden, having become chief royal preacher in 1830.  He died in 1839.

Wallin’s main contribution was literary, especially in the realm of hymnody.  He served on the committee which produced a proposed successor to the 1695 Psalmboken, or hymnal, in 1811.  That revision, criticized roundly, never became official.  Yet Wallin did forge the 1819 Psalm-Boken, which the Church of Sweden amended in 1920 and replaced in 1937.  The 1819 volume

represented both the high point in classic Swedish literary style and the blending of the new idealist romanticism with the older strict Lutheran theology.  In time it came to win such a secure place in the hearts of the Swedish people that no other book could completely replace it.

–Joel W. Lundeen in Marilyn Kay Stulken, Hymnal Companion to the Lutheran Book of Worship (Philadelphia, PA:  Fortress Press, 1981), pages 45-46

Yet the 1819 Psalm-Boken had its critics from the left and the right.  Pietists tended to find it too rigidly orthodox, so they prepared their own unofficial books.  And strict orthodox factions, objecting to the romanticism of the 1819 volume, prepared their unofficial hymnals.  One of these (from 1849) became the official (Swedish-language) hymnal of the old Augustana Synod in North America in 1892.

Wallin’s work dominated the 1819 Psalm-Boken, which contained 500 hymns.  He wrote 128 of them, translated twenty-three, and revised 178.  That influence remained strong in the book’s 1937 successor, with about one-third of whose content bore Wallin’s stamp.

I have added some of our saint’s hymns to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  Wallin’s output being so numerous, I have chosen to include just two hymn texts in this post.  The first is his great Christmas hymn, translated by Ernst William Olson in The Hymnal and Order of Service (1925), Augustana Synod:

All hail to thee, O blessed morn!

To tidings long by prophets borne

Hast thou fulfillment given.

O sacred and immortal day,

When unto death, in glorious ray,

Descends the grace of heaven!

Singing,

Ringing,

Sounds are blending,

Praises sending

Unto heaven

For the Saviour to us given.

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‘Tis God’s own Image and, withal

The Son of Man, that mortals all

May find in Him a brother.

He comes, with peace and love to bide

On earth, the erring race to guide

And help as could no other;

Rather

Gather

Closer, fonder,

Sheep that wander,

Feed and fold them,

Then let evil powers hold them.

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He tears, like other men, will shed,

Our sorrows share, and be our aid,

Through His eternal power;

The Lord’s good will unto us show,

And mingle in our cup of woe

The drops of mercy’s shower;

Dying,

Buying

Through His passion

Our salvation,

And to mortals

Opening the heavenly portals.

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He comes, for our redemption sent,

And by His glory heaven is rent

To close upon us never;

Our blessed Shepherd He would be,

Whom we may follow faithfully

And be with Him forever;

Higher,

Nigher,

Glory wringing,

Praises singing

To the Father

And His Son, our Lord and Brother.

And, to complete the process which the Incarnation began, there was Easter.  Thus I share the following text, translated by Brent Emil Bengston, and also from the 1925 Hymnal:

He lives! O fainting heart, anew

With joy thy Lord and Saviour view!

He from the silent chamber woke,

And speaks again as e’er He spoke.

A quickening hand He has to give:

He lives, and thou shalt also live.

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O hear His voice and take His hand,

Thou traveler to a better land;

While passing through thy crucial test,

Lift up thy head,–a peaceful rest;

Thy trials over, He shall give:

He lies, and thou shalt also live.

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Ye dead in sin, awake, arise!

The Lord is calling from the skies.

Repentant come, in faith remain,

And live in Him; from sin and pain

And death shall He salvation give:]

He lives, and thou shalt also live.

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With Him thy guide lies smooth and bright

The pathway to the realms of light;

Abiding faith, undying love,

And hope lead to the home above.

Thy life into His keeping give:

He lives, and thou shalt also live.

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Of glory shall His raiment be;

O’er time and o’er eternity

The Sun of righteousness shall shine;

In heaven’s throne He sits divine;

A footstool earth to Him shall give:

He lives, and thou shalt also live.

Thanks be to God for the life and work of Archbishop Wallin!

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 18, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE CONFESSION OF SAINT PETER, APOSTLE

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Johann Olaf Wallin and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Philip Doddridge (June 26)   4 comments

philip-doddridge

Image in the Public Domain

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PHILIP DODDRIDGE  (JUNE 26, 1702-OCTOBER 26, 1751)

English Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

Philip Doddridge, along with people, such as Isaac Watts and Charles Wesley, occupies space in the pantheon of English-language hymn writers.  He wrote over 400 hymns as follow-ups to sermons.  Unfortunately, as the contents of hymnals change with each generation, the number of great hymns decreases (with some exceptions) as the proportion of substandard praise music (“seven-eleven songs” and other texts with few words) increases (with some exceptions).  One lineage of hymn books documents this pattern.  The Methodist Hymnal (1905) contains twenty-two Doddridge hymns.  The Methodist Hymnal (1935) has eight.  The Methodist Hymnal/The Book of Hymns (1966) contains seven.  And The United Methodist Hymnal (1989) has a not-so-grand total of one.

Doddridge was born in London, England, in 1702.  His father was a wealthy oil merchant.  His mother was the daughter of a Lutheran pastor who had fled persecution in Bohemia.  Family life was devout yet brief, for our saint became an orphan at a young age.  Doddridge, educated at Kingston Grammar School then at the Nonconformist (Congregationalist) school at Kibworth, declined an opportunity to study for Anglican Holy Orders.  He became a Congregationalist minister in 1723 instead.

Doddridge, minister at Kibworth for for a few years, moved to the Castle Hill Meeting (now a congregation of the United Reformed Church) at Northampton in 1729.  There he ministered to a flock of poor people and founded a seminary, where he taught most of the subjects and trained hundreds of clergymen.  This work ended in 1750, when our saint contracted tuberculosis.  He, seeking to restore his health, traveled to Lisbon, Portugal, yet died there the following year.

The publication of Doddridge’s hymns occurred posthumously. And his collected theological works–many of them influential across decades and centuries–filled ten volumes:  I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, and X.  I have added some of Doddridge’s texts to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  There are too many others to include all of them in this post, but here are two:

How gentle God’s commands!

How king his precepts are!

Come, cast your burdens on the Lord,

And trust his constant care.

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Beneath his watchful eye

His saints securely dwell;

That hand which bears all nature up

Shall guard his children well.

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Why should this anxious load

Press down your weary mind?

Haste to your heavenly Father’s throne,

And sweet refreshment find.

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His goodness stands approved,

Unchanged from day to day:

I’ll drop my burden at his feet,

And bear a song away.

and

Ye servants of the Lord,

Each in his office wait,

Observant of his heavenly word,

And watchful at his gate.

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Let all your lamps be bright,

And turn the golden flame;

Gird up your loins, as in his sight,

For awful is his name.

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Watch, ’tis your Lord’s command:

And while we speak he’s near;

Mark the first signal of his hand,

And ready to appear.

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O happy servant he

In such a posture found!

He shall his Lord with rapture see,

And be with honor crowned.

Doddridge’s legacy is a wonderful one.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 15, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR., NATIONAL BAPTIST PASTOR

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Philip Doddridge and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

Feast of Charlotte Elliott, Julia Anne Elliott, and Emily Elliott (September 22)   3 comments

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Above:  The Pier from the East, Brighton, England, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-08044

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CHARLOTTE ELLIOTT (MARCH 18, 1789-SEPTEMBER 22, 1871)

Anglican Hymn Writer

sister-in-law of

JULIA ANNE ELLIOTT (1809-1841)

Anglican Hymn Writer

aunt of

EMILY ELIZABETH STEELE ELLIOTT (JULY 22, 1836-AUGUST 3, 1897)

Anglican Hymn Writer

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With this post I add three members of the Elliott family–one famous mostly for just one hymn out of the nearly 150 she wrote–the other saints not as well known.

The Elliotts came from the Evangelical branch of The Church of England.  The Reverend Henry Venn (1725-1797), Curate of Clapham, had been an associate of George Whitefield, John Wesley, and Charles Wesley.  The Reverend John Venn (1759-1813), also Curate of Clapham, had ministered to William Wilberforce and other abolitionists and presided (in 1799) over the founding of the Church Missionary Society.  Charlotte Elliott, daughter of Charles Elliott (a silk merchant) and Elmy Venn, was a granddaughter of Henry Venn and a niece of John Venn.  Two brothers–Henry Venn Elliott and Edward Bishop Elliott–were Anglican priests at Brighton.

Charlotte Elliott, born at Clapham, grew up in a religious household.  Swiss evangelist Cesar Malan (1797-1864) was a familiar presence in her life.  For the first thirty-two years of her life Charlotte lived in the household of her father at Clapham.  She, an invalid for the last fifty years of her life, suffered pain daily.  This pain led to spiritual crisis.  Then, via Malan, a spiritual epiphany inspired “Just as I Am, Without One Plea,” published in the 1841 edition of Charlotte’s The Invalid’s Hymn Book.

Charlotte, who lived at Brighton from 1823 until her death, composed that hymn there.  One day she was home alone.  The rest of the family had gone to a fundraiser for the future St. Mary’s Hall (founded in 1836), the brainchild of her brother, the Reverend Henry Venn Elliott.  St. Mary’s Hall offered subsidized education to the daughters of local Anglican clergymen.

“Just as I Am” is Charlotte’s most famous hymn, but she wrote about 150 others, many of which deserve attention also.  Some of them follow:

Charlotte published various collections of texts:

  • Hours of Sorrow Cheered and Comforted (1836);
  • Morning and Evening Hymns for a Week (1836);
  • The Invalid’s Hymn Book (1834-1841); and
  • Thoughts in Verse on Sacred Subjects (1869).

Some of her texts appeared also in Psalms and Prayers for Public, Private, and Social Worship (1835-1839), edited by her brother, Henry Venn Elliott.

One text from Morning and Evening Hymns for a Week follows:

Christian, seek not yet repose;

Hear thy guardian angel say,

“Thou art in the midst of foes:

Watch and pray.”

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Principalities and powers,

Mustering their unseen array,

Wait for thy unguarded hours:

Watch and pray.

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Gird thy heavenly armor on;

Wear it ever, night and day;

Ambushed lies the evil one:

Watch and pray.

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Hear the victors who o’ercame;

Still they mark each warrior’s way;

All with one sweet voice exclaim,

“Watch and pray.”

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Hear, above all, hear thy Lord,

Him thou lovest to obey;

Hide within thy heart His word,

“Watch and pray.”

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Watch as if on that alone

Hung the issues of the day:

Pray that help may be sent down:

Watch and pray.

Henry Venn Elliott also published at least one text by his wife, Julia Anne Elliott (1809-1841) in the editions of Psalms and Hymns (1835-1839).  Julia Anne Marshall had been a parishioner before becoming Julia Anne Elliott.  Of her the Handbook to The Hymnal (1935), page 331, says:

She had a personality of great charm; she was affectionate, gentle, imaginative, devout.

Julia died after giving birth to her fifth child.

Among her hymns was “Hail, Thou Bright and Sacred Morn” (1833).

Emily Elliott (1836-1897), born at Brighton, was a niece of Charlotte and Julia and a daughter the Reverend Edward Bishop Elliott, priest at St. Mark’s Church.  For six years Emily edited The Church Missionary Society Juvenile Instructor, in which she published many of her hymns.  Among these was “Thou Didst Leave Thy Throne and Thy Kingly Crown” (1864), published therein in 1870.  She wrote this hymn for the children and choir of St. Mark’s Church, Brighton, and reprinted it, with some changes, in her Chimes for Daily Services (1880).  Emily also published Hymns of Consecration (1873) and Under the Pillow, a devotional book designed for placing under the pillow of an ill person.

Another one of Emily’s hymns was “There Came a Little Child to Earth” (1856), revised for Chimes for Daily Services (1880):

There came a little Child to earth

Long ago;

And the angels of God proclaimed His birth,

High and low.

Out on the night, so calm and still,

Their song was heard;

For they knew that the Child on Bethlehem’s hill

Was Christ the Lord.

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Far away in a goodly land,

Fair and bright,

Children with crowns of glory stand,

Robed in white,

In white more pure than spotless snow;

And their tongues unite

In the psalms, which the angels sang long ago

On that night.

+++++

They sing how the Lord of that world so fair

A child was born,

And, that they might a crown of glory wear,

Wore a crown of thorn,

And in mortal weakness, in want and pain,

Came forth to die,

That the children of earth might for ever reign

With Him on high.

+++++

He has put on His kingly apparel now,

In that goodly land;

And He leads, to where fountains of water flow,

That chosen band;

And for ever more, in their robes most fair

And undefiled,

Those ransomed children His praise declare

Who was once a child.

These three women have bequeathed to us a laudatory literary and spiritual legacy.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 21, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF GEORGIA HARKNESS, UNITED METHODIST THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF SAINT KENNETH OF WALES, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Charlotte Elliott, Julia Anne Elliott, Emily Elizabeth Steele Elliott,

and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Revised on December 24, 2016

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Feast of James Allen and Oswald Allen (October 2)   Leave a comment

12298v

Above:  Kirby Londale Market Square, Between 1880 and 1890

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsca-12298

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JAMES ALLEN (JUNE 24, 1734-OCTOBER 31, 1804)

English Inghamite then Glasite/Sandemanian Hymn Writer

great-uncle of

OSWALD ALLEN (1816-OCTOBER 2, 1878)

English Glasite/Sandemanian Hymn Writer

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Before I write about our saints for today I must, for the sake of clarity, explain the terms “Inghamite” and “Glasite/Sandemanian.”

John Glas (1695-1773) was a minister of the Church of Scotland who left that denomination for a variety of reasons.  Among them was his opinion that there was no New Testament basis for having a national church.  The Church of Scotland suspended him in 1728 and defrocked him two years later.  Thus Glas became the leader of the Glasite sect, which practiced, among other things, weekly communion, communal ownership of property, and relative (to its culture) egalitarianism.  His son-in-law, Robert Sandeman (1718-1771), developed doctrines further and led the sect after Glas died.  The sect has become extinct, many of its last members converting to the Congregationalist Church.

Benjamin Ingham (1712-1772), ordained an Anglican priest in 1735, traveled to Georgia with John and Charles Wesley.  Ingham was

full of missionary zeal for the conversion of the Indians.

–Quoted in Henry Thompson Malone, The Episcopal Church in Georgia, 1733-1957 (Atlanta, GA:  The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Atlanta, 1960, page 13)

In 1738 Ingham joined John Wesley, recently escaped from Georgia, on a trip to Germany.  Afterward he broke with Wesley, siding mostly with the Moravians they had gone to visit.  Ingham proceeded to found the Moravian Methodists, for Inghamites, at Yorkshire.  He built up eighty congregations, which he oversaw.  In 1754 Ingham broke with the Moravians; his congregations had become independent.  Six years later he adopted much Glasite/Sandemanian mysticism.  Then the Inghamite movement fell apart.  He became a Glasite/Sandemanian, taking thirteen congregations with him.  Most of the others became Methodists.

James Allen (1734-1804) grew up in The Church of England.  The family’s intention was that he would take Holy Orders, but he abandoned that plan at Cambridge, where he converted to the Inghamites.  Later he followed Ingham into the Glasite/Sandmanian sect.  Allen preached, finally at a chapel he built near his home.  He edited and contributed to the Kendall Hymn Book (1757).  Among his hymns was the following:

Glory to God on high!

Let earth and skies reply;

Praise ye his name:

His love and grace adore,

Who all our sorrows bore;

Sing aloud evermore,

Worthy the Lamb.

—–

Jesus, our Lord and God,

Bore sin’s tremendous load,

‘Praise ye his name:

Tell what his arm hath done,

What spoils from Death he won,

Sing his great name alone;

Worthy the Lamb.

—–

While they around the throne

Cheerfully join in one,

Praising his name:

Those who have felt his blood

Sealing their peace with God,

Sound his dear fame abroad,

Worthy the Lamb.

—–

Join, all ye ransomed race,

Our holy Lord to bless;

Praise ye his name:

In him we will rejoice,

And make a joyful noise,

Shouting with heart and voice,

Worthy the Lamb.

—–

What though we change our place

Yet shall we never cease

Praising his name:

To him, our gracious King,

And without ceasing sing,

Worthy the Lamb.

—–

Then let the hosts above,

In realms of endless love,

Praise his dear name:

To him ascribed be

Honor and majesty,

Through all eternity,

Worthy the Lamb.

James Allen’s great-nephew, Oswald Allen (1816-1878), grew up a Glasite/Sandemanian.  Oswald, like his father, was a banker.  Oswald, educated at home, had a life-long problem, which James Moffatt described as

a diseased spine.

Handbook to The Church Hymnary (London, UK:  Oxford University Press, 1927, page 251)

Oswald left his hometown, Kirkby Lonsdale, Westmorland, for Edinburgh, to work at the stock exchange there, but had to return home in 1848 due to his spine.  So he started a career at the Lancaster Banking Company, rising to Manager.  During the Winter of 1858-1860 Oswald, confined to his home, completed Hymns of the Christian Life, a collection of 148 texts published in 1861.  As James Moffatt wrote,

When the little book was published, the Bank staff, it is said, viewed this proceeding on the part of one of their officials with no little perturbation.

Handbook to The Church Hymnary, page 252

The original text of one of Oswald’s hymns begins

Today Thy mercy calls me….

but hymnal committees have traditionally changed the first-person singular to first-person plural.  The Church Hymnary (1927) omits one stanza yet The Lutheran Hymnal (1941) contains all of them.  So here is the version of that hymn from the latter volume:

Today Thy mercy calls us

To wash away our sin.

However great our trespass,

Whatever we have been,

However long from mercy

Our hearts have turned away,

Thy precious blood can cleanse us

And make us white today.

—–

Today Thy gate is open,

And all who enter in

Shall find a Father’s welcome

And pardon for their sin.

The past shall be forgotten,

A present joy be giv’n,

A future grace be promised,

A glorious crown in heav’n.

—–

Today our Father calls us,

His Holy Spirit waits;

His blessed angels gather

Around the heav’nly gates.

No question will be asked us

How often we have come;

Although we oft have wandered,

It is our Father’s home.

—–

O all-embracing Mercy,

O ever-open Door,

What should we do without Thee

When heart and eye run o’er?

When all things seem against us,

To drive us to despair,

We know one gate is open,

One ear will hear our prayer.

One name–Oswald Allen–launched me on the journey which culminates in this post.  Now I know more about English and Scottish church history and have read some lovely hymns.  I am better for all the above.  And I pray that you, O reader, are edified likewise.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 23, 2013 COMMON ERA

PROPER 7–THE FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, YEAR C

THE FEAST OF SAINT NICETAS OF REMESIANA, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF WIREMU TAMIHANA, MAORI PROPHET AND KINGMAKER

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

James Allen and Oswald Allen and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of John Cennick (July 3)   2 comments

AgnusDeiWindow

Above:  Logo of the Moravian Church in Stained-Glass

Image Source = JJackman

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JOHN CENNICK (DECEMBER 12, 1718-JULY 4, 1755)

British Moravian Evangelist and Hymn Writer

John Cennick died at London, England, on July 4, 1755, aged thirty-seven years and survived by a widow and two children.  He had traveled in Germany, England, and Northern Ireland, founding at least forty churches in six years before fever caught up with him.

Cennick came from a historically Quaker family yet grew up Anglican.  He became a land surveyor, a profession he abandoned to become a Methodist lay preacher after meeting John and Charles Wesley in 1739.  The following year John Wesley appointed Cennick to teach children at a school at Kingswood, England.  Yet Cennick fell out with the founder of Methodism almost immediately.  Three theological issues separated them:

  1. Cennick, unlike Wesley, distrusted the rampant emotionalism at early Methodist gatherings.  Wesley thought such outbursts were manifestations of the Holy Spirit.
  2. Wesley rejected all forms of Predestination.  Cennick was a Calvinistic Methodist.
  3. Wesley advocated the doctrine of Christian Perfection, something Cennick rejected.

So, from 1740 to 1745, Cennick worked with George Whitefield.  Then our saint joined the Moravian Church in 1745 and became an ordained minister and evangelist in that communion four years later.  From time to time Wesley and Cennick crossed paths and Wesley continued to oppose Cennick’s work.

Cennick wrote hymns and published collections:

  • Sacred Hymns for the Children of God in the Days of Their Pilgrimage (1741);
  • Sacred Hymns for the Use of Religious Societies (1743);
  • A Collection of Sacred Hymns (1749); and
  • Hymns to the Honour of Jesus Christ, Composed for Such Little Little Children as Desire to Be Saved (1754).

Among Cennick’s hymns was the following:

Children of the heavenly King,

As ye journey, sweetly sing;

Sing your Saviour’s worthy praise,

Glorious in His works and ways.

—–

We are travelling home to God,

In the way the fathers trod;

They are happy now, and we

Soon their happiness shall see.

—–

Lift your eyes, you sons of light;

Zion’s city is in sight.

There our endless home shall be,

There our God we soon shall see.

—–

Fear not, brethren; joyful stand

On the borders of your land;

Jesus Christ, your Father’s Son,

Bids you undismayed go on.

—–

Lord, obediently we go,

Gladly leaving all below;

Only Thou our Leader be,

And we still will follow Thee.

John Cennick did much for God in a brief span of time.  What is God calling you to do, O reader?  May you do that.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 15, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE FIRST U.S. PRESBYTERIAN BOOK OF COMMON WORSHIP, 1906

THE FEAST OF CAROLINE CHISHOLM, HUMANITARIAN

THE FEAST OF PIRIPI TAUMATA-A-KURA, ANGLICAN MISSIONARY

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Almighty God, we praise you for your servant John Cennick,

through whom you have called the church to its tasks and renewed its life.

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your church and proclaim the reality of your reign,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with the the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60