Archive for the ‘Charles William Schaeffer’ Tag

Feast of Matthias Loy and Conrad Hermann Louis Schuette (August 11)   3 comments

City Hall, Columbus, Ohio, 1900

Above:  City Hall, Columbus, Ohio, Between 1900 and 1910

Publisher and Copyright Claimant = Detroit Publishing Company

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-det-4a23314

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MATTHIAS LOY (MARCH 17, 1828-JANUARY 26, 1915)

U.S. Lutheran Minister, Educator, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator

predecessor of

CONRAD HERMANN LOUIS SCHUETTE (JUNE 17, 1843-AUGUST 11, 1926)

German-American Lutheran Minister, Educator, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator

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Usually my multisaint posts add related people to the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.  This one, however, recognizes two unrelated men who had much in common:

  1. Both ministered at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, Delaware, Ohio, in immediate succession;
  2. Both wrote and translated hymns;
  3. Both taught at Capital University, Columbus, Ohio, at the same time;
  4. Both served as the President of Capital University, Capital University, in immediate succession;
  5. Both wrote and published on theological topics; and
  6. Both served as the President of the Evangelical Lutheran Joint Synod of Ohio and Other States (1818-1930), which I will refer to hereafter as the Ohio Synod, in immediate succession.

Both men were also Confessional Lutherans during a different time and a cultural milieu distinct from mine.  We would have agreed and disagreed on much.  My Anglican sense of collegiality has led me to admit the existence of areas of profound disagreement while emphasizing the theological common ground.  Despite major differences I have encountered while reading some of their writings, I recognize Loy and Schuette and coreligionists and add them to the Ecumenical Calendar enthusiastically.  Christian faith is far more than a matter of theological Twenty Questions; it is a pilgrimage of following Jesus.

Matthias Loy had help achieving his vocation.  His impoverished childhood began near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on March 17, 1828.  The Loys, a Lutheran family with ultimately seven children (of which Matthias was the fourth), moved to Hogestown in 1834.  Our saint’s mother provided his elementary education.  He became an apprentice to Baab and Hummel, printers at Harrisburg, during his fourteenth year of life.  This apprenticeship lasted for about six years, during which he attended school–first as a private student in Latin and Greek of the Principal of Harrisburg Academy, then as a regular student at that institution.  Our saint’s pastor at Zion Lutheran Church, Harrisburg, Charles William Schaeffer (1813-1896), who met him via Mr. Hummel, encouraged the young man to enter the ordained ministry.  Health concerns led Loy to move westward to Circleville, Ohio, in August 1847, where he entered into a contract to print a German-language semi-monthly newspaper for the United Brethren Publishing House.  However, the Lutheran pastor at Circleville arranged for financial assistance which permitted our saint to leave for Capital University, Columbus, to study theology in the near future.  Loy got out of his contract and embarked on his vocation.  He graduated in 1849 and became an ordained minister of the Ohio Synod.

Loy’s ministerial career played out on the synodical and academic fields:

  1. His one pastorate was St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, Delaware, Ohio, from 1849 to 1865.
  2. He was twice the President of the Ohio Synod.  Loy’s first tenure was 1860-1868.  During this time he kept the Ohio Synod out of the General Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in North America (1867-1918), a relatively conservative body which his mentor, Charles William Schaeffer, cofounded then led for a time.  Loy framed the Four Points–Premillennialism, altar fellowship, pulpit fellowship, and secret societies–which troubled the General Council during the early years of its existence.
  3. He edited the Lutheran Standard from 1864 to 1891.
  4. He taught theology at Capital University from 1865 to 1878.
  5. In 1868 Loy vacated the Presidency of the Ohio Synod in favor of the Vice President, William F. Lehmann, who died two years later.
  6. In 1870 Loy returned to the Presidency of the Ohio Synod for his second tenure, which ended in 1894.  During this tenure he helped to form the Evangelical Lutheran Synodical Conference of North America (1871-1963) (hereafter the Synodical Conference), which was more conservative than the General Council, in 1872.  Ten years later, however, Loy led the Ohio Synod out of the Synodical Conference over a dispute regarding the Missouri Synod’s theology of predestination.
  7. He served as the President of Capital University from 1870 to 1890.
  8. He founded the Columbus Theological Magazine in 1881.
  9. In 1890 he rejoined the theology faculty at Capital University, retiring in 1902 due to bad health.

Loy’s published works included the following:

  1. Life and Deeds of Dr. Martin Luther, by Hermann Fick (1868, as translator);
  2. The Doctrine of Justification (first edition, 1869; second edition, 1882);
  3. “Essay on the Ministerial Office” (1870);
  4. Sermons on the Gospels (1888);
  5. Christian Prayer (1890);
  6. The Story of My Life (third edition, 1905);
  7. The Augsburg Confession (1908);
  8. The Sermon on the Mount:  A Practical Study of Chapters V-VII of St. Matthew’s Gospel (1909); and
  9. Sermons on the Epistles (1910).

Then, as one of my sources informed me, “the softening of his brain” set in.  Loy, the husband of Mary Willey of Delaware, Ohio, from 1853 and the father of seven children (five of whom outlived him) died at Columbus, Ohio, on January 26, 1915.

Loy’s written legacy persists, however.  I have listed some of his books and an essay, but I would be remiss if I failed to mention his twenty original hymns and his translations of German hymns.  One may find many of them in the Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal (1880) and the Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal (1908).  I have added part of his contribution to hymnody to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.

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Conrad Hermann Louis Schuette succeeded Loy as pastor at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, Delaware, Ohio, serving there from 1865 to 1873.  Schuette, born at Varrel, Hanover, on June 17, 1843, emigrated to the United States with his family in 1854. He attended Capital University then became a minister of the Ohio Synod.  The newly ordained clergyman’s first posting was at Delaware, Ohio.  His wife (from September 4, 1865) was Victoria M. Wirth of Columbus, Ohio.  His immediate successor at St. Mark’s was Emanuel Cronenwett (1841-1931), who served there from 1873 to 1877.

Schuette’s career was mostly synodical and academic:

  1. He was Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy at Capital University from 1873 to 1880.
  2. He was Professor of Theology at Capital University from 1880 to 1890.
  3. He succeeded Matthias Loy as the President of Capital University in 1890, serving until 1894.
  4. He served as the pastor of Christ Lutheran Church, Pleasant Ridge (now Bexley), Ohio, from 1891 to 1894.
  5. He served as the President of the Ohio Synod from 1894 to 1924.
  6. He cofounded the National Lutheran Council (1918-1966) and served as its President from 1923 to 1925.

He died at Columbus, Ohio, on August 11, 1926.

Schuette wrote books, composed hymn texts, and translated hymns.  His books included the following:

  1. The Church Members’ Manual;
  2. Church, State, and School;
  3. Before the Altar; and
  4. Exercises Unto Godliness.

Some of his texts, original and translated, appeared in the Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal (1880) and the Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal (1908).  I have added one of his hymns, “Great God, a Blessing from Thy Throne” (1880), to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.

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These two men make fine additions to the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 8, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE FIFTH SUNDAY AFTER THE EPIPHANY, YEAR B

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOSEPHINE BAKHITA, ROMAN CATHOLIC NUN

THE FEAST OF SAINTS JOHN OF MATHA AND FELIX OF VALOIS, FOUNDERS OF THE ORDER OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY

THE FEAST WINFIELD SCOTT HANCOCK, U.S. ARMY GENERAL

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O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Matthias Loy, Conrad Hermann Louis Schuette, and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

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Feast of Johann Franck, Heinrich Held, and Simon Dach (June 18)   2 comments

Luther Rose

Above:  Luther Rose

Scan by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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JOHANN FRANCK (JUNE 1, 1618-JUNE 18, 1677)

German Lutheran Hymn Writer

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HEINRICH HELD (JULY 21, 1620-AUGUST 16, 1659)

German Lutheran Hymn Writer

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SIMON DACH (JULY 29, 1605-APRIL 15, 1659)

German Lutheran Hymn Writer

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In this post I return to one of  my favorite themes–people influencing each other positively.

Johann Franck (1618-1677) became one of the greatest hymn writers of this time.  His work marked the transition from objective hymns which reinforced doctrines to the dominance of subjective texts.  Franck’s emphasis was the union of a person’s soul with Jesus.  The collection of his hymns was Geitliches Sion (1674).

Franck entered the world at Guben, Brandenburg, on June 1, 1618.  His father, Johann Franck (Sr.), a councilor and an advocate there, died in 1620.  Our saints’s uncle, Adam Tielckau, the town’s judge, raised him.  Franck, educated at Guben, Cottbus, Stettin, and Thorn, entered law school at the University of Konigsberg, Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia), in 1638.  That institution of higher learning was a shelter from the ravages of the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648).  While at the university our saint avoided certain destructive excesses with the help of Heinrich Held (1620-1659) and Simon Dach (1605-1659).

Heinrich Held, born at Guhrau, Silesia, on July 21, 1620, felt the affects of the Thirty Years’ War during his youth.  His family had to flee Guhrau for Fraustadt, Prussia (now Wschowa, Poland), to escape religious persecution.  From 1637 to 1640 he studied law at the University of Konigsberg.

Simon Dach, born at Memel, Prussia (now Klaipeda, Lithuania), grew up in a family of humble means, for his father, a court interpreter, earned a modest income.  Dach attended the cathedral school at Konigsberg then departed for Wittenberg to escape an outbreak of the plague.  Later he studied at Magdeburg yet left that city to flee from the plague and the Thirty Years’ War.  Thus he came to study philosophy and theology at the University of Konigsberg in 1626.  He remained in that city for the rest of his life.  Dach earned his degree then became a private tutor.  In 1633 he started teaching at the cathedral school; three years later he became the co-rector there.  In 1639 Dach became the Chair of Poetry at the University of Konigsberg, from which he received his doctorate the following year.  He led a prominent group of poets which published eight books of songs and poems from 1638 to 1650.  One member of this group was Johann Franck.

Franck returned to Guben and his mother in 1640; the town had suffered greatly during the Thirty Years’ War.  He remained at that town for the rest of this life.  There he started practicing law in 1645, becoming a respected attorney in time.  He became a burgess councilor in 1648, the mayor thirteen years later, and a deputy to the Landtag (parliament) of Lower Lusatia in 1671.  He died at Guben on June 18, 1677.

Held, Franck’s fellow law student at Konigsberg, went on to study at Frankfurt and Leyden before traveling in The Netherlands, England, and France.  In 1647 he was a practicing attorney at Rostock.  The Thirty Years’ War, however, forced him to leave for Altdamm, a suburb of Stettin, Prussia (now Szczecin, Poland).  He became the clerk of Altdamm in 1657; later he served as the town treasurer and a councilor.  In 1659, however, Held became ill during a siege.  (The Swedish and Prussian governments disagreed about who had jurisdiction in the area.)  Our saint found refuge and a place to die at Stettin.  He, one of the best Silesian hymn writers, wrote Deutschen Gedichte Vartrab (1643) and received much recognition for his literary ability during his lifetime.

A portion of a Catherine Winkworth (1827-1878) translation of one of Held’s Christmas texts follows:

Welcome, O my Savior, now!

Hail! My Portion, Lord, art Thou.

Here, too, in my heart, I pray,

Oh, prepare Thyself a way!

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King of Glory, enter in;

Cleanse it from the filth of sin,

As Thou hast so often done;

It belongs to Thee alone.

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As Thy coming was in peace,

Quiet, full of gentleness,

Let the same mind dwell in me

That was ever found in Thee.

The Lutheran Hymnal (1941), hymn #91

Dach’s final eighteen years of life contained personal commitment and a prolific output of hymns.  He married Regina Pohl, daughter of the court attorney, in 1641.  The couple had seven children.  And, after the death of his friend Robert Rotherbin in 1648, Dach ceased to compose secular poems and wrote more than 150 hymns instead.  He died at Konigsberg on April 15, 1659.

War shaped the times of these three men’s lives.  That context was often evident in their hymn texts, such as the following stanza by Heinrich Held in 1658, according to the 1866 translation by Charles William Schaeffer (1813-1896):

Holy Spirit, strong and mighty,

Thou who makest all things new,

Make Thy work within me perfect,

Help me by Thy Word so true;

Arm me with that sword of Thine,

And the victory shall be mine.

Common Service Book of the Lutheran Church (1917), hymn #149

Regardless of your context, O reader, may you find your source of faith to persevere and to glorify God.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 10, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT THEODOSIUS THE CENOBRIARCH, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF CHARLES WILLIAM EVEREST, EPISCOPAL PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN THE GOOD, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF MILAN

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM LAUD, ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Johann Franck, Heinrich Held, Simon Dach,

 and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Charles William Schaeffer (May 5)   2 comments

United Lutheran Church in America

Image Source = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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CHARLES WILLIAM SCHAEFFER (MAY 5, 1813-MARCH 15, 1896)

U.S. Lutheran Minister, Historian, Theologian, and Liturgist

The last few saints I have added to the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days have been Moravians.  (More will follow.)  Now I turn to Lutherans.  First out of the gate is Charles William Schaeffer (1813-1896), a man with whom I would have had many agreements and disagreements.  Agreeing with me is not mandatory for inclusion on my Ecumenical Calendar, however.

Our saint came from a devout Lutheran family.  His father, Frederick Solomon Schaeffer, was a minister who died in 1814.  The causa mortis was a fever the pastor had contracted upon visiting a military camp near Hagerstown, Maryland, our saint’s birthplace.   Charles William’s mother moved him to Carlisle, Pennsylvania.  There, in time, she married the Reverend Benjamin Keller.  The family relocated to Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1829.  Our saint graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with honors in 1832 then from Gettysburg Theological Seminary, an institution of the General Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the U.S.A. (hereafter the General Synod), the oldest national Lutheran organization, which existed from 1820 to 1918.

Schaeffer, ordained, embarked upon his ministerial career.  From 1835 to 1840 he served as the first resident pastor of two congregations in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania–St. Peter’s Church, Barren Hill, and Union Church, White Marsh.  Then, from 1840 to 1849, our saint ministered at Zion Lutheran Church, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.  His final pastorate, from 1849 to 1875, was St. Michael’s Church, Germantown, Pennsylvania, in which he had grown up.  During his time our saint earned his Doctor of Divinity from the University of Pennsylvania.  He also served as a trustee of that institution of higher learning from 1859 to 1896.

Disputes flowing from differences in theology and polity as well as among strong personalities divided the General Synod in the 1860s.  The German Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Pennsylvania and Adjacent States, the oldest of the regional and state synods in the country, had a tense, off-and-on relationship with the General Synod, which it had helped to found in 1820, left a few years later, and returned to in 1853.  The Ministerium of Pennsylvania was more confessional in doctrine than the General Synod.  Related to that issue was polity, for the General Synod tended to prefer more centralized authority over its synods, including those which were more confessional in doctrine.  The founding of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1864 as a more confessional institution occurred in this context.  Schaeffer, who, over time, served as the President of both the Ministerium of Pennsylvania and the General Synod, taught at the new seminary.  And, in 1867, he helped to form the breakaway General Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in North America (hereafter the General Council), which he served as Vice President then as President.

The other group to emerge from the General Synod in the 1860s was a Southern denomination.  The General Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the Confederate States of America (1863-1866) became the General Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in North America (1866-1876) then the General Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of the South (1876-1886).  The Southern General Synod, theologically closer to the General Council to the General Synod, united with two other Southern synods in 1886.  The Evangelical Lutheran Tennessee Synod, which dated to 1820, had refused to enter into the General Synod.  The Evangelical Lutheran Holston Synod had broken away from the Tennessee Synod in 1860 due to geographical separation from the rest of the parent body via the Allegheny Mountains.  The 1886 merger created the United Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the South.  The shorthand version of the name was the United Synod of the South.  The General Synod, the General Council, and the United Synod of the South reunited in 1918 to form the United Lutheran Church in America (ULCA), a predecessor body of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA).

Schaeffer was a liturgist and a hymn translator.  He served on the committee responsible for producing the landmark Liturgy for the Use of the Evangelical Lutheran Church (1860), a crucial step in U.S. Lutheran liturgical development.  One of his hymn translations, “Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, I’m Baptized in Thy Dear Name,” is available at my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.

Schaeffer also wrote or translated books, including the following:

  1. A Discourse Exhibiting the History of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (1846);
  2. Early History of the Lutheran Church in America, from the Settlement of the Swedes on the Delaware, to the Middle of the Eighteenth Century (1857);
  3. Golden Treasury for the Children of God (translated from the German, 1860);
  4. Family Prayer for Morning and Evening, and the Festivals of the Church Year (1862); and
  5. Halle Reports (translated from the German, 1882).

Schaeffer died at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on March 15, 1896.  He had spent most of his life using his talents, literary and intellectual, for the glory of God.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 2, 2015 COMMON ERA

THE NINTH DAY OF CHRISTMAS

THE FEAST OF JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH, COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF SABINE BARING-GOULD, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT SERAPHIM OF SAROV, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX MONK

THE FEAST OF VEDANAYAGAM SAMUEL AZARIAH, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF DORNAKAL

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O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Charles William Schaeffer and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

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