Archive for the ‘Consultation on Church Union’ Tag

Feast of Eugene Carson Blake (November 5)   Leave a comment

Above:  My Copies of the Presbyterian Books of Confessions, from 1967, 1985, and 2007

Photographer = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

The Book of Confessions (1967), of The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.

The Book of Confessions (1985, 2007), of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

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EUGENE CARSON BLAKE (NOVEMBER 7, 1906-JULY 31, 1985)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Ecumenist, and Moral Critic

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Boasting about our heritage of freedom, we allied ourselves with some of the worst dictators all over the world, as long as they were, in our judgment, anti-communist.  We have justified all sorts of immoral political acts either because we thought they would weaken communism or (even a more immoral excuse) that since the communists were doing them, so must we….These, and other such actions, have been occasioned far more by fear of communism than by concern for justice.

–Eugene Carson Blake, quoted in G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006), 554

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Eugene Carson Blake comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via Cady and Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Blake came from Midwestern Presbyterian stock.  He, born in St. Louis, Missouri, on November 7, 1906, was a son of Lulu Blake and Orville Prescott Blake.  Our saint graduated from Princeton University with a degree in philosophy in 1928.  Then he taught the Bible, English, and philosophy at Forman Christian College, Lahore (then in India; now in Pakistan), for a year (1928-1929).  Next, Blake studied theology at New College, Edinburgh (1929-1930).  He matriculated at Princeton Theological Seminary in 1930 and graduated two years later.

Our saint, ordained in the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (PCUSA) in 1932, embarked upon his ministerial career.  He was, in order:

  1. the assistant pastor (1932) then the senior pastor (1932-1935) of the Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas (Reformed Church in America), New York, New York;
  2. the senior pastor of the First Presbyterian Church (PCUSA), Albany, New York (1935-1940); and
  3. the senior pastor of the Pasadena Presbyterian Church (PCUSA), Pasadena, California (1940-1951).

Blake left parish ministry in 1951.  He served as the Stated Clerk of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (1951-1958).  As such, he helped to execute the merger of the PCUSA with The United Presbyterian Church of North America (UPCNA) to form The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (UPCUSA) in 1958.  Then he served as the President of the Stated Clerk of the UPCUSA (1958-1966).

Above:  The Logo of the UPCUSA

Scanned by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

On the ecumenical front, Blake also served as the President of the National Council of Churches (1954-1957) then as the General Secretary of the World Council of Churches (1966-1972).

Blake’s ecumenism led to the founding of the Consultation on Church Union (1962-2002), the predecessor of Churches Uniting in Christ (2002-).  In 1960, at Grace Episcopal Cathedral, San Francisco, California, he preached a famous sermon.  Our saint advocated for the merger of The UPCUSA (1958-1983), The Methodist Church (1939-1968), The Episcopal Church (1789-), and the United Church of Christ (1957-) into one denomination truly both Catholic and Reformed.

The Consultation on Church Union included ten denominations in 1967:

  1. the African Methodist Episcopal Church,
  2. the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church,
  3. the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ),
  4. the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church,
  5. The Episcopal Church,
  6. the Evangelical United Brethren Church (merged into The United Methodist Church, 1968),
  7. The Methodist Church (merged into The United Methodist Church, 1968),
  8. the Presbyterian Church in the United States (merged into the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), 1983),
  9. the United Church of Christ, and
  10. The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (merged into the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), 1983).

The successor organization, Churches Uniting in Christ, consciously confronts racism.  The members are:

  1. the African Methodist Episcopal Church,
  2. the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church,
  3. the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ),
  4. the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church,
  5. The Episcopal Church,
  6. the International Council of Community Churches,
  7. the Moravian Church in America,
  8. the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.),
  9. the United Church of Christ, and
  10. The United Methodist Church.

That anti-racism is consistent with our saint’s legacy.

Blake was active in the Civil Rights Movement.  On July 4, 1963, he went to jail for trying to integrate the Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, Baltimore, Maryland.  The following month, he was prominent at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which he had helped to organize.  Our saint was one of speakers at that great event.  And, at the World Council of Churches (1966-1972), Blake led a global anti-racism program.

Blake’s opposition to the Vietnam War earned the ire of two Presidents of the United States of America.  He became persona non grata with Lyndon Baines Johnson (in office 1963-1969).  Richard Nixon (in office 1969-1974) had a list of 576 enemies, subject to official harassment, such as tax audits and F.B.I. investigations.  “Enemies” included actor Paul Newman (1925-2008), journalists Daniel Schorr (1916-2010) and Mary McGrory (1918-2019), and U.S. Representatives John Conyers (1929-2019) and Ron Dellums (1935-2018).  That list also included Blake.  Newman described being on Nixon’s enemies list as a great honor.  Schorr, whom the F.B.I. investigated, spoke to Nixon at a social occasion years after Nixon left office.  The journalist referred to that investigation.  The former President, apparently not apologetic and repentant, replied:

I damn near hired you once.

Blake was in very good company on Nixon’s list of enemies.

Blake also helped to make the United Presbyterian Book of Confessions and Confession of 1967 possible.  The first edition of The Book of Confessions debuted in 1967.  The emphasis on reconciliation in Christ in the Confession of 1967 was consistent with our saint’s work.

In Jesus Christ God was reconciling the world to himself.  He is the eternal Son of the Father, who became man and lived among us to fulfill the work of reconciliation.  He is present in the church by the power of the Holy Spirit to continue and complete his mission.  This work of God, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, is the foundation of all confessional statements about God, man, and the world.  Therefore the church calls men to be reconciled to God and to one another.

–From the Confession of 1967, quoted in The Book of Confessions (1967), 9.07

In retirement, Blake worked for Bread for the World.  Feeding starving people was consistent with decreasing poverty, another social justice issue and long-time cause of our saint.  He had worked on economic and social development at the World Council of Churches, too.

Blake, aged 78 yeas, died in Stamford, Connecticut, on July 31, 1985.  By then The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. and the Presbyterian Church in the United States had merged to form the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), in 1983.

Blake got more right than wrong–a daunting task and a great accomplishment.

I am an ecumenist.  Denominational structures exist because of human nature.  We in the Universal Church should, of course, strive to reduce the number of denominations via well-reasoned and feasible mergers.  And, when organic union is not feasible, perhaps cooperation is.  So be it.

I am also an Episcopalian.  I have definite Roman Catholic tendencies.  What passes for corporate worship in most of Protestantism leaves me uninspired.  I want to ask:

Do you call this a proper liturgy?

My denominational Plan B is the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), in full communion with The Episcopal Church.  This is a good fit, given the historical relations between Anglicanism and Lutheranism.

Blake’s proposed United Presbyterian Church-United Church of Christ-Methodist Church-Episcopal Church union was not feasible.  For example, in 1993, the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) published its most recent Book of Common Worship.  It was a vast improvement over The Worshipbook–Services (1970), incorporated into The Worshipbook–Services and Hymns (1972).  Many Presbyterians objected to the new Book of Common Worship.  It was too Episcopalian, they said.

A denomination has a character.  Some denominations are better fits with other denominations than with others.

Blake issued his proposal at a different time.  Most Christian denominations in the United States of America were growing in membership, for example.  Also, The Episcopal Church had yet to bear the full fruits of liturgical renewal in 1960.  Nevertheless, his vision for a more united institutional church has become more relevant when, in the United States of America and the rest of the Western world, “none” has become the fastest-growing religious affiliation.

Sadly, Blake’s foci on reducing poverty and racism are more germane than ever.  Related to them is another one of his favorite themes.  We need reconciliation with each other and God more than ever.  Reconciliation is difficult to achieve when mutually hostile camps cannot even agree on what constitutes objective reality.

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Loving and righteous God, who transcends all religious denominations,

we thank you for the faithful ministry, social witness, and legacy of your servant, Eugene Carson Blake.

May we also seek to bring the world closer to the high calling of the fully-realized Kingdom of God,

and embrace our brother and sister Christians in other denominations;

for your glory and for the common good.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Leviticus 19:9-18

Psalm 133

1 Corinthians 1:10-17

John 17:20-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 24, 2021 COMMON ERA

GENOCIDE REMEMBRANCE

THE FEAST OF SAINT EGBERT OF LINDISFARNE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK; AND SAINT ADALBERT OF EGMONT, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARY

THE FEAST OF SAINT FIDELIS OF SIGMARINGEN, CAPUCHIN FRIAR AND MARTYR, 1622

THE FEAST OF JOHANN WALTER, “FIRST CANTOR OF THE LUTHERAN CHURCH”

THE FEAST OF SAINT MELLITUS, BISHOP OF LONDON, AND ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

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Feast of Gerald Kennedy (August 30)   5 comments

Above:  The Logos of The Methodist Church (1939-1968) and The United Methodist Church (1968f), from Copies of The Book of Worship for Church and Home (1965), Pre-Merger and Post-Merger

Photographer = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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GERALD HAMILTON KENNEDY (AUGUST 30, 1907-FEBRUARY 17, 1980)

U.S. Methodist Bishop and Hymn Writer

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Any church that starts out to be a success in the world’s eyes is doomed to failure.

–Bishop Gerald Kennedy, 1960; quoted in TIME magazine, April 11, 1960

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Most of the so-called devotional material is shallow and meaningless tripe that makes me sick to my stomach.

–Bishop Gerald Kennedy, on religious publications

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INTRODUCTION

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Bishop Gerald Hamilton Kennedy comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).

As I looked for an image to place at the top of this post, I found pictures of Bishop Kennedy here and here. Given questions of copyright, I have chosen to provide links instead of risking invoking the wrath of the copyright enforcers. I have also trusted that using the camera on my smartphone to take a photograph of book spines from my library, transferring that image my computer, cropping that image, flipping it in my computer, and inserting that photograph at the top of this post has not angered the high gods and enforcers of copyright laws.

Kennedy was one of the most prominent preachers in the United States of America and one of the greatest bishops in The Methodist Church (1939-1968) and The United Methodist Church (1968f).  He, like anyone who has lived a long time, changed his mind as he aged.  Kennedy, for example, moved from the theological left to Neo-orthodoxy then out of it.  By 1961, our saint was also openly dismissive of Norman Vincent Peale‘s “Power of Positive Thinking.”  Kennedy called that message,

a spiritual aspirin tablet, a spiritual glass of Ovaltine.

Yet Kennedy was, according to Presbyterian arch-fundamentalist Carl McIntire (1906-2002), in 1963,

a liberal, leftist apostate

–redundant, given McIntire’s narrow, combative theology.

In other words, Kennedy was by the standards of his time, somewhere in the middle.

  1. He opposed communism vigorously.
  2. He opposed the “Death of God” movement.
  3. In 1963, he invited ostracized, pro-civil rights ministers in Mississippi into the California-Pacific Conference.
  4. He ridiculed supporters of the proposed Methodist-Episcopal-United Church of Christ-United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. merger (1960; the beginning of the Consultation on Church Union) as “ecumaniacs” in 1961.
  5. He endorsed the Anti-Defamation League’s protest against Soviet repression of Jewry, in 1964.
  6. He supported Billy Graham’s crusade in Los Angeles in 1963.
  7. He favored ecumenical cooperation yet opposed the creation of an allegedly unwieldy Protestant super-church.  As Kennedy said in 1967, he liked having guests yet did not want to have them move in.
  8. His critics came from both his right and his left.

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THE FIRST FORTY YEARS

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Gerald Hamilton Kennedy knew when he was a very young child that he had a vocation to ordained ministry.  He, born in Benzonia, Michigan, on August 30, 1907, was a son of Herbert Grant Kennedy and Marian Phelps Kennedy.  Our saint studied at the College of the Pacific (B.A., 1929).  Upon graduation, he had already married Mary Grace Leeper, on June 2, 1928.  The M.A. (1931) and the Ph.D. (1932) from the Pacific School of Religion followed.  Then Kennedy studied at Hartford Theological Seminary (S.T.M., 1933; Ph.D., 1934).

Kennedy, as an ordained minister, served in congregations in four denominations, three of them Methodist.  His first parish was the First Congregational Church (The General Council of the Congregational Christian Churches in the United States), Collinsville, Connecticut (1932-1936).  (This congregation has become the Christ Community Church of Collinsville, an affiliate of the Conservative Congregational Christian Conference.)  Kennedy, ordained in the Methodist Episcopal Church (1784-1939), had graduated from a Congregationalist theological seminary.  Starting in 1936, he ministered within the bounds of his tradition–in the Methodist Episcopal Church, The Methodist Church (1939-1968), and The United Methodist Church (1968f).  He served at Calvary Methodist Episcopal (Methodist, 1939-1940) Church, San Jose, California (1936-1940), now Calvary United Methodist Church.  Then he served at the First Methodist (now United Methodist) Church of Palo Alto, California (1940-1942).  Kennedy was also the Acting Professor of Homiletics at the Pacific School of Religion (1938-1942) and the Director of the Wesley Foundation at Stanford University (1940-1942).   Then Kennedy relocated to Nebraska.  He served at Saint Paul Methodist (now United Methodist) Church, Lincoln (1942-1948).  He was also Lecturer in Religion at Nebraska Wesleyan University in 1942.  While in Lincoln, furthermore, Kennedy preached on the radio (1945-1948) and sat on the Executive Committee of the Community Chest (1945-1948).

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BISHOP KENNEDY

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In 1948, at the age of forty years, Kennedy became the youngest Methodist bishop in the United States.  Portland, Oregon, was his base of operations for four years.  Then, in 1952, our saint, reassigned to the California-Pacific Conference (Hawaii, Arizona, and Southern California), moved to Los Angeles.  He served as the bishop there for two decades.

Kennedy remained busy building up church and society.  He was a preacher, not an administrator.  He sat on various denominational boards and committees.  He served on the state Board of Education.  Our saint spent a year (1960-1961) as the President of the Council of Bishops.  He wrote most of his twenty-one books.  Kennedy served on the texts subcommittee for The Methodist Hymnal (1966).  And he lectured at universities and theological seminaries, as he had done since 1946.  Meanwhile, Kennedy tended conscientiously to to his flock and maintained a rigorous travel schedule.

By 1968, however, Kennedy needed to travel less frequently; his health had begun to fail.  Denominational law permitted early retirement at the age of 65 years–in August 1972, in our saint’s case.  In this context, Kennedy appointed himself the Senior Minister of the First United Methodist Church, Pasadena, California, effective December 8, 1968.  In laymen’s terms, the organic fertilizer hit the ecclesiastical fan.

An active bishop doubling as a parish minister was without precedent in the Methodist tradition, but not in other denominations.  In my adopted denomination, The Episcopal Church, for example, William White (1747-1836) served as the Rector of Christ Church and St. Peter’s Church, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1779-1836); the Bishop of Pennsylvania (1787-1836); and the Presiding Bishop of the denomination (1789, 1795-1836).  In my home state, Stephen Elliott (1806-1866), the first Bishop of Georgia (1841-1866), served also as the Rector of Christ Church, Savannah (1852-1859, 1861-1866); as well as the Presiding Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America (1862-1866).

I also note that Mark A. Cowell, the Episcopal Bishop of Western Kansas (2018f), doubles as the Vicar of Holy Nativity, Kinsley; the Vicar of Saints Mary and Martha, Larned; the Municipal Prosecutor in Dodge; and the County Attorney in Hodgerman County.  In other words, an active bishop doubling as a parish minister can be a workable situation.

Kennedy’s self-appointment triggered a denominational bureaucratic-judicial series of events that resulted in a settlement.  He got to serve as the Senior Minister of the First United Methodist Church, Pasadena, without administrative responsibilities and a second salary, so long as he was an active bishop.  Kennedy also preached three Sundays a month.  This arrangement was mutually agreeable, and consistent with Kennedy’s intentions anyway.  

Kennedy retired twice.  He retired as an active bishop in August 1972, after his sixty-fifth birthday.  He had already suffered a mild stroke at the 1972 General Conference, in Atlanta, earlier in the year.  Then our saint retired from parish ministry in 1973.

Gerald and Mary Kennedy moved into an apartment in Laguna Hills, California, in September 1973.  The bishop’s health continued to deteriorate.  A series of strokes robbed the great orator of his voice.  Kennedy, aged 72 years, died at the hospital in Laguna Hills on February 17, 1980.

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EVALUATION

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Kennedy wrote a hymn, “God of Love and God of Power,” while at Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church, San Jose, California, in the late 1930s.  That hymn debuted in a hymnal when The Methodist Hymnal (1966) included it.  The United Methodist Hymnal (1989) has retained the hymn.

We are not the first to be

banished by our fears from thee;

give us courage, let us hear

heaven’s trumpets ringing clear.

God of love and God of power,

thou hast called us to this hour.

That stanza from Kennedy’s hymn speaks to the mission of the Church.  The bishop’s example, bound by time and other circumstances, contains a timeless principle–the need to have courage and to banish fears that separate us from God.

Kennedy certainly behaved courageously, according to the demands of the Gospel, as he understood it, upon his life.  He lived and worked in a different political climate and a different societal milieu.  The Cold War defined Kennedy’s time.  In the early 1960s, when our saint derided attempts to merge denominations from different Christian traditions, membership was increasing in the United States.

(Aside:  Frankly, I do not know how merging The Methodist Church, The Episcopal Church, the United Church of Christ, and The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. would have been feasible or desirable.  Ecumenism works better via cooperation than organic union sometimes.  Reformed denominations merging can make sense.  So can uniting Wesleyan denominations.  Likewise, merging Lutheran denominations can be feasible and desirable.  Baptist denominations divide more often than they merge, but Baptist mergers can be workable, too.  This is not to say that breaking down lines separating traditions is never a good idea.  The Church of South India, formed in 1947, seems to work well, for example. And my denomination, The Episcopal Church, has joint congregations with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.  I do not know how well a merger of the denominations would work, though.  I am open to the idea, however.)

God of love and God of power,

thou hast called us for this hour.

The hour of 2021, when I write and publish this blog post, is unlike any of Bishop Kennedy’s hours.  Nevertheless, the refrain from his hymn joins his example in challenging us to ask ourselves what his hour requires of us in the Church.  We may disagree with Kennedy of certain points.  I do.  Yet we can still recognize the greatness of the faith that animated him and defined his life.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 15, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE NEW MARTYRS OF LIBYA, 2015

THE FEAST OF BEN SALMON, U.S. ROMAN CATHOLIC PACIFIST AND CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR

THE FEAST OF FRANCIS HAROLD ROWLEY, NORTHERN BAPTIST MINISTER, HUMANITARIAN, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF MICHAEL PRAETORIUS, GERMAN LUTHERAN COMPOSER AND MUSICOLOGIST

THE FEAST OF THOMAS BRAY, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND MISSIONARY

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Heavenly Father, shepherd of your people,

we thank you for your servant Gerald Hamilton Kennedy,

who was faithful in the care and nurture of your flock;

and we pray that, following his example and the teaching of his holy life,

we may by your grace grow into the full stature of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3:14-21

John 21:15-17 or Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 38

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Feast of Massey H. Shepherd, Jr. (February 19)   1 comment

Above:  The Book of Common Prayer (1979)

Photograph by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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MASSEY HAMILTON SHEPHERD, JR. (MARCH 14, 1913-FEBRUARY 19, 1990)

Episcopal Priest, Ecumenist, and Liturgist

Dean of American Liturgists

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O God, whose son Jesus is the good shepherd of your people:  Grant that when we hear his voice we may know him who calls us each by name, and follow where he leads; who, with you and the Holy Spirit, lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

–Massey H. Shepherd, Jr., Contemporary Collect for the Fourth Sunday of Easter; in The Book of Common Prayer (1979), 225

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Massey H. Shepherd, Jr., with his courtly Southern manners, big smile, and love of cats, was an engaging person.  He has come to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via his liturgical work, mainly.

Shepherd helped to revolutionize liturgy in The Episcopal Church, to much praise and condemnation.  He, born in Wilmington, North Carolina, on March 14, 1913, grew up primarily in Columbia, South Carolina.  Our saint eared his B.A. and M.A. at the University of South Carolina.  His Ph.D. (1937) from The University of Chicago followed.  Then our saint matriculated at Berkeley Divinity School, New Haven, Connecticut.  There he became a protégé of William Palmer Ladd (1870-1941), Dean of the seminary and a proponent of liturgical renewal, especially with regard to increasing congregational participation in worship.  As early as 1956, Shepherd advocated having the celebrant face the congregation, not turn his back on it, during the Eucharistic prayers.

Shepherd was an ecclesiastical historian and a liturgist.  The two fields went hand-in-hand, for our saint found influences in ancient liturgies.  (Liturgical renewal was, to a great extent, a process of reviving older, abandoned traditions that predated Reformation-era practices.)  Our saint taught at the Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Massachusetts (1940-1954); and the Church Divinity School of the Pacific, Berkeley, California (1954-1981).  He also sat on the denomination’s Standing Liturgical Commission from 1947 to 1976 and served as its Vice-Chairman from 1964 to 1976.

Shepherd had a few goals, which became reality.  In 1946 he helped to found the Associated Parishes for Liturgy and Mission, one purpose of which was to make the Eucharist the central Sunday service in The Episcopal Church.  He also made Baptism a public (never private) rite in The Book of Common Prayer (1979).  Furthermore, our saint wrote The Liturgy of the Lord’s Supper (1967), which began the introduction of modern English into worship in The Episcopal Church.  He, as a member of the Standing Liturgical Commission, had a hand in subsequent trial-use volumes:

  1. Services for Trial Use (1971),
  2. Authorized Services 1973 (1973), and
  3. The Proposed Book of Common Prayer and Other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church (1976).

Shepherd, author of more than 30 books (mostly about liturgies), the General Article about the Post-Apostolic Church in Volume I (1952) of The Interpreter’s Bible, and the commentaries on the Gospel and three Epistles of John in The Interpreter’s One-Volume Commentary on the Bible (1971), had a magnum opus:  The Book of Common Prayer (1979).  He translated the alternative (second) form of absolution (page 448) from Form One of the Reconciliation of a Penitent.  Shepherd wrote:

  1. the Litany of Penitence (pages 267-269) from the Ash Wednesday service,
  2. the postcommunion prayer (page 432) from the marriage ceremony,
  3. an alternative postcommunion prayer (page 457) from Ministration to the Sick,
  4. the postcommunion prayer (pages 482 and 498) from the Burial of the Dead,
  5. the Litany of Thanksgiving (pages 836-837),
  6. the collect for the Third Sunday after the Epiphany (pages 163 and 215),
  7. the collect for the Fourth Sunday of Easter (pages 173 and 225),
  8. the collect for Proper 6 (pages 178 and 230),
  9. the collect for the Feast of the Confession of Saint Peter (pages 187 and 238),
  10. the collect for the Feast of Saint Joseph (pages 188 and 239),
  11. the collect for the Feast of Saint Mark (pages 188 and 240),
  12. the collect for the Feast of Saint Barnabas (pages 189 and 241),
  13. the collect for the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul (pages 190 and 241),
  14. the collect for Holy Cross Day (pages 192 and 244),
  15. the collect for the Feast of Saint Matthew (pages 192-193 and 244),
  16. the collect for the Feast of Saint James of Jerusalem (pages 193 and 245), and
  17. the collect for the Feast of Saints Simon and Jude (pages 194 and 245).

If all that were not enough, Shepherd was also an ecumenist.  He was an observer from the Anglican Communion to the Second Vatican Council (Vatican II).  Our saint, as a member of the worship committee of the Churches Uniting in Christ, successor of the Consultation on Church Union), wrote much of the liturgy of Churches Uniting in Christ.

Shepherd’s liturgical contribution was great.  It was also controversial. (Bile regarding him is easy to find on the Internet, not that I encourage anyone to read it.)  In the early 1970s, publishing the Lord’s Prayer without archaic pronouns upset many people, for example.  Many members of the Society for the Preservation of the Book of Common Prayer (the Prayer Book Society) have probably never forgiven Shepherd for his work in the revision of The Book of Common Prayer (1928).

C’est la vie.

Shepherd, aged 76 years, died in Sacramento, California, on February 19, 1990.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 24, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ANNA ELLISON BUTLER ALEXANDER, AFRICAN-AMERICAN EPISCOPAL DEACONESS IN GEORGIA, AND EDUCATOR

THE FEAST OF HENRY HART MILMAN, ANGLICAN DEAN, TRANSLATOR, HISTORIAN, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT JUVENAL OF ALASKA, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX MARTYR IN ALASKA, AND FIRST ORTHODOX MARTYR IN THE AMERICAS, 1796

THE FEAST OF SAINT PETER THE ALEUT, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX MARTYR IN SAN FRANCISCO, 1815

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Massey H. Shepherd, Jr.)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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