Archive for the ‘J. B. Finneran’ Tag

Feast of Vincent Taylor (October 13)   Leave a comment

Above:  Part of The Interpreter’s Bible, Volume VII (1951), 114

Scan by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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VINCENT TAYLOR (JANUARY 1, 1887-1968)

British Methodist Minister and Biblical Scholar

Vincent Taylor comes to this, my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Interpreter’s Bible, for which he wrote the article, “The Life and Ministry of Jesus” (Volume VII, 1951).

Taylor, born in Edenfield, Lancashire, England, was an active scholar for nearly half a century–1920 to 1968.  His family moved to Accrington, in 1890; there he finished growing to adulthood.  Our saint studied for the Methodist ministry at Richmond College.  He was a parish minister from 1910 to 1930 and during World War II.  Along the way he earned his doctorate from the University of London (1922), worked as Tutor in New Testament Language and Literature at Wesley College, Leeds (1930f), and served as the Principal of the same college (1936-1953).

Taylor was conservative yet not fundamentalist; he rejected Biblical infallibility.

  1. He recognized the existence of disagreements within the New Testament.  Some books supplemented others, he insisted.
  2. He, a practitioner of textual, form, source, and historical criticism, rejected Bultmannian skepticism regarding the historicity of the four canonical Gospels.  At the same time, Taylor did not reject Bultmannian demythologizing completely.
  3. Our saint neither defended miracle stories uncritically nor rejected them; he knew the limits of what history could prove and disprove.  Taylor, in a Kierkegaardian leap of faith, accepted the Virgin Birth of Jesus, defending it on dogmatic, not historical, grounds.
  4. Our saint argued that Luke incorporated Q into the Gospel of Luke.
  5. Taylor also recognized the presence of multiple theories of the atonement in the New Testament.  He, not seeking to harmonize them, rejected Penal Substitutionary Atonement, criticized the Classic Theory of the Atonement also, and affirmed the centrality of the death and resurrection of Jesus.

Taylor wrote:

The New Testament is not a fortuitous collection of separate writings, but a medium in which the significance of Christ, as the Word of God and the Saviour of men, emerges clearly into the light of day.

Taylor also had a balanced view of individual and societal sinfulness, and interpreted the Bible in the context of his times.  He, taking into account the evils of Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin, interpreted the “obey the government” passage in Romans 13 in a particular way.  St. Paul the Apostle, Taylor argued, obviously had not considered mass-murdering dictators or the possibility of the Holocaust.  Therefore, our saint wrote, nobody should permit Romans 13 to stand in the say of resisting tyrants.  He, understanding that sin is both individual and collective, also wrote of the necessity of both individual and collective salvation.

Major works by Taylor included The Gospel According to Saint Mark (1952), Doctrine and Evangelism (1953), and The Epistle to the Romans (1955).

Taylor, aged 81 years, died in 1968.

Taylor’s argument regarding Romans 13 rings true with me.  I cannot imagine God condemning anyone for refusing to obey Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, Mao Tse-tung, or Pol Pot–dictators with extremely bloody hands.  After all, the commandment to effect social justice is always binding.  Nevertheless, I recall reading a chilling argument to the contrary in the October 30, 1974, issue of The Presbyterian Journal, the magazine that had midwifed the birth of the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) the previous year.  The editor, G. Aiken Taylor, approved of the following statement, submitted by a reader, one J. B. Finneran, “an elect lady from Simpsonville, MD”:

The Bible commands us to obey earthly authority, for God establishes governments….When a Herod or a Hitler comes into power, we must thereby assume this is the Lord’s plan; He will use even such as these to put His total plan into effect for the good of His people here on earth.

–Page 11

I affirm the sovereignty of God, too, but is there no good reason to resist tyrants, according to J. B. Finneran and G. Aiken Taylor?  Their argument is law and order on steroids.

Vincent Taylor, being a mortal, was incorrect on some points, of course.  He was, however, a man who loved God with his intellect and who got much right.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

OCTOBER 10, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF JOHANN NITSCHMANN, SR., MORAVIAN MISSIONARY AND BISHOP; DAVID NITSCHMANN, JR., THE SYNDIC, MORAVIAN MISSIONARY AND BISHOP; AND DAVID NITSCHMANN, THE MARTYR, MORAVIAN MISSIONARY AND MARTYR

THE FEAST OF CHRISTIAN LUDWIG BRAU, NORWEGIAN MORAVIAN TEACHER AND POET

THE FEAST OF EDWARD BENSON WHITE, ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

THE FEAST OF LOUIS FITZGERALD BENSON, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER AND HYMNODIST

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O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Vincent Taylor and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

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