Archive for the ‘Jeanne Guyon’ Tag

Feast of Mary Lundie Duncan (January 10)   1 comment

07621v

Above:  Ruins of Roxburgh Castle, Kelso, Scotland, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-07621

Published by Detroit Publishing Company, 1905

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MARY LUNDIE DUNCAN (APRIL 26, 1814-JANUARY 5, 1840)

Scottish Presbyterian Hymn Writer

Mary Lundie, born in Kelso, Scotland,was a daughter of the Reverend Robert Lundie, a Church of Scotland minister.  Her sister married Horatius Bonar (1808-1889), a great hymn writer.  Our saint married the Reverend William Wallace Lundie (died in 1864), a Church of Scotland minster at Cleish, in 1836.  Their marriage was brief, for she died in January 1840, after a chill turned into a fever.  Our saint died a few months before her twenty-sixth birthday, leaving two young children behind.

The 1935 companion volume to the 1933 Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Hymnal says of our saint:

Mary Duncan was a most remarkable character.  Her contemporaries compared her brilliant mind, overflowing personality, and devout spirit to those of Madame Guyon, the “evangelist of quietism.”

–pages 461-462

And Robert Guy McCutchan, in his 1937 companion volume t the 1935 Methodist Hymnal, wrote:

She was a beautiful woman with a beautiful character.

Here is an image of Mary Lundie Duncan I found at http://www.hymntime.com/tch/bio/d/u/n/duncan_ml.htm:

duncan_ml

And here is a public domain image of Madame Jeanne Guyon (1648-1717):

Jeanne_Marie_Bouvier_de_la_Motte_Guyon_-_Project_Gutenberg_eText_13778

For more about Quietism, follow this link.

Our saint wrote hymns for her children from July to December 1839.  Her mother had them published posthumously.  Among those hymns was  “Jesus, Tender Shepherd, Hear Me.”

Our saint’s widower participated in the 1843 Disruption which formed the Free Church of Scotland, which reunited with the Church of Scotland in 1929.

Mary Lundie Duncan lived well during the short span of her life.  She devoted her life to God and loved her family.  Fortunately for us, that legacy survives in hymnals.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS VINCENTIA GEROSA AND BARTHOLOMEA CAPITANIO, COFOUNDERS OF THE SISTERS OF CHARITY OF LOVERE

THE FEAST OF ISAIAH, BIBLICAL PROPHET

THE FEAST OF JAN HUS, PROTO-PROTESTANT MARTYR

THE FEAST OF SAINT PALLADIUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Mary Lundie Duncan and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Revised on November 21, 2016

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Feast of Francois Fenelon (January 7)   1 comment

Above:  Francois Fenelon

Image in the Public Domain

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FRANCOIS FENELON (AUGUST 6, 1651-JANUARY 7, 1715)

French Theologian and Archbishop of Cambrai

Francois Fenelon, born on August 6, 1651, came from a family that included bishops.  He received a classical education, including Greek, rhetoric, and philosophy.  Ordained a priest in 1675, Fenelon preached to Huguenots (French Calvinists)  in 1686-1687 and convinced the King Louis XIV to remove the outward signs of religious persecution.  This might not seem like much to occupants of religiously free nations today, but it was progress by the standards of the time.

In 1688 Fenelon advocated the education of girls and women in serious matters, including theology.  This constituted further evidence of his progressiveness, which manifested itself in other ways which caused difficulties for him in later years.

From 1689 to 1697, Fenelon tutored the dauphin (in this case, the father of Louis XV).  In 1696, toward the end of this assignment, Fenelon became Archbishop of Cambrai, a post he held until 1714.

One of Felelon’s acquaintances was one Jeanne-Marie Bouvier  de la Motte-Goyon, of simply Madame Guyon.  She advocated Quietism, which the Roman Catholic Church considered a heresy.  (It continues to do so.)  According to Quietism, the highest human perfection consists of a self-annihilation and absorption into the divine, especially in this life, making room for constant contemplation of God.  This, in turn, leads to a state at which the soul ceases to need prayers, hymns, and rituals.  This variety of mysticism threatened the hierarchical Catholic Church.  Fenelon’s defense of Madame Guyon prompted Louis XIV to remove his as tutor and to restrict him to the Archdiocese of Cambrai, despite the fact that Fenelon had backed down from his defense of Madame Guyon and her brand of Quietism.  (Guyon’s views led to her imprisonment from 1695 to 1703.)

In 1699 Fenelon took another risk.  He published The Adventures of Telemachus, the story of Telemachus, the son of Odysseus, and his tutor, Mentor,  actually Minerva, Goddess of Wisdom.  Mentor condemns war, luxury, and selfishness while praising fraternity and altruism.  Also, Mentor lashes out at mercantilism and high taxes on peasants.  The Adventures of Telemachus was an attack on the French monarchy.

As Archbishop, Fenelon tended faithfully to the people of his archdiocese, preaching on major feast days and focusing on the training of seminarians.  During the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714), when Spanish troops invaded the archdiocese, Fenelon opened his palace to refugees.

Archbishop Fenelon wrote condemnations of the heresy called Jansenism, a hybrid of Roman Catholicism and Calvinism.

Fenelon died on this day in 1715, shortly after resigning his archdiocese.

KRT

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A Prayer by Archbishop Fenelon, from The Communion of Saints: Prayers of the Famous, edited by Horton Davies:

Lord, take my heart, for I cannot give it to you.  And when you have it, keep it, for I would not take it from you.  And save me in spite of myself, for Christ’s sake.  Amen.

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Almighty God, you have raised up faithful bishops of your church, including your servant Francois Fenelon.  May the memory of his life be a source of joy for us and a bulwark of our faith, so that we may serve and confess your name before the world, through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3;14-21

Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Revised on November 13, 2016

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