Archive for the ‘John Greenleaf Whittier’ Tag

Feast of William Ketcham Anderson (February 6)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Signature of William Ketcham Anderson

Cropped from The Minister and Human Relations (1943)

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WILLIAM KETCHAM ANDERSON (APRIL 27, 1888-FEBRUARY 7, 1947)

U.S. Methodist Minister and Hymn Tune Composer

The Reverend William Ketcham Anderson comes to this, A GREAT CLOUD OF WITNESSES:  AN ECUMENICAL CALENDAR OF SAINTS’ DAYS AND HOLY DAYS, via The Hymnal (1941), of the old Evangelical and Reformed Church.

Anderson, born in New York, New York, on April 27, 1888, was a son of the Reverend William Franklin Anderson (1860-1944) and Jennie Lulah Ketcham Anderson.  The father, ordained in 1887, was a minister in the old Methodist Episcopal Church (1784-1939).  He, elected to the episcopate in 1908, retired in 1932.

Our saint joined the ranks of the clergy, too.  He graduated from Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut (A.B., 1910).  Then Anderson taught at Central High School, Chattanooga, Tennessee (1910-1911).  (His father was the MEC bishop based in Chattanooga at the time.)  Our saint, ordained in 1912, ministered first in the Carpenter Circuit in Wyoming.  Then he returned to New York City, for academic studies.  Anderson graduated from Columbia University (M.A., 1913) and Union Theological Seminary (B.D., 1914).  He, ordained a deacon in 1915 and an elder two years later, served as the Director of the Wesley Foundation at The Ohio State University (1915-1918).

Anderson married Fannie East Spencer on December 19, 1916.  The couple had four children:

  1. Almeda Jane;
  2. Elizabeth Cushman;
  3. Josephine Spencer; and
  4. William Franklin, II.

Our saint’s wife and children outlived him.

Anderson filled two more non-parish positions after leaving the Wesley Foundation at The Ohio State University.  He served as the Executive Secretary of the Ohio Council of Churches (1919) then as Field Secretary of the Inter-Church World Movement for Ohio (1920).

Anderson served in three congregations from 1920 to 1940:

Anderson was the pastor of Calvary Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (1920-1926).  He began to compose music while serving there.  In 1924, our saint submitted his entry for a contest the Hymn Society of America sponsored.  He composed a tune for “I Know Now How That Bethlehem’s Babe,” by Harry Webb Farrington (1879-1930).

Anderson was the pastor of First Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church, Butler, Pennsylvania (1926-1928).

Anderson was the pastor of Franklin Street Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church, Johnstown, Pennsylvania (1928-1940).  He received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, in 1930.  That year, our saint also composed JOURNEY’S END, a hymn tune, for “When On My Day of Life Night is Falling,” by John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892).  Anderson composed this hymn tune during his wife’s serious illness.

A three-way reunion created The Methodist Church (1939-1968).  In 1940, Anderson moved to Nashville, Tennessee, to become the Director of the Methodist Commission on Ministerial Training.  He held this position for the rest of his life.  In this capacity, our saint wrote one book and edited seven others.  He wrote A Church Membership Manual for Methodist Pastors (1943).  Anderson edited the following volumes:

  1. The Minister and Human Relations (1943),
  2. Pastor and Church (1943),
  3. Protestantism:  A Symposium (1944),
  4. Making the Gospel Effective (1945),
  5. Students’ Handbook (1945),
  6. Christian World Mission (1946), and
  7. Methodism (1947).

Anderson, a member of the Commission on Worship and Music of the Federal Council of Churches (I do not know when.), died on February 7, 1947.  He was 58 years old.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 9, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF MARTIN CHEMNITZ, GERMAN LUTHERAN THEOLOGIAN, AND THE “SECOND MARTIN”

THE FEAST OF ANDREAS PETER BERGGREEN, DANISH LUTHERAN MUSICOLOGIST, ORGANIST, MUSIC EDUCATOR, AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF ELIJAH P. LOVEJOY, U.S. JOURNALIST, ABOLITIONIST, PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER, AND MARTYR, 1837; HIS BROTHER, OWEN LOVEJOY, U.S. ABOLITIONIST, LAWMAKER, AND CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER; AND WILLIAM WELLS BROWN, AFRICAN-AMERICAN ABOLITIONIST, NOVELIST, HISTORIAN, AND PHYSICIAN

THE FEAST OF JOHANN(ES) MATTHAUS MEYFART, GERMAN LUTHERAN EDUCATOR AND DEVOTIONAL WRITER

THE FAST OF MARGERY KEMPE, ENGLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC MYSTIC AND PILGRIM

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM CROSWELL, EPISCOPAL PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

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Heavenly Father, shepherd of your people,

we thank you for your servant William Ketcham Anderson,

who was faithful in the care and nurture of your flock;

and we pray that, following his holy life,

we may by your grace grow into the full stature

of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3:14-21

John 21:15-17 or Matthew 24:42-47

Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 38

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Feast of Edward Grubb (January 23)   1 comment

Above:  Edward Grubb

Image in the Public Domain

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EDWARD GRUBB (OCTOBER 19, 1854-JANUARY 23, 1939)

English Quaker Author, Social Reformer, and Hymn Writer

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We believe in human brotherhood, in the sanctity of human life and personality.  We will not kill.

–No-Conscription Fellowship, “Shall Britons Be Conscripts?” (May 25, 1916)

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Edward Grubb, born in Sudbury, Suffolk, England, on October 19, 1854, was a faithful Quaker.  His family, originally from southern Ireland, included Jonathan (his father) and Elizabeth (his mother).  Our saint, educated at the Friends’ School at Sidcot, Leeds University, and the University of London (M.A., 1880), married Emma Marie Horsnail on July 8, 1877.  The couple had one daughter, Edith.

Our saint, who reconciled faith and reason, admired the works of John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), taught in Quaker schools, wrote books, edited a publication, opposed wars, and worked for prison reform.  He edited The British Friend from 1901 to 1913, served as the secretary of the Howard Association (for prison reform) from 1901 to 1906, and held the title of Honorary Treasurer of the No-Conscription Fellowship during World War I.  Grubb’s books included the following:

  1. What is Quakerism?,
  2. The Bible:  Its Nature and Inspiration,
  3. Christianity is Life,
  4. Christianity is Truth, and
  5. The Light of Life:  Hymns of Faith and Consolation (1925).

The time immediately following World War I was an era of widespread disillusionment.  The Great War was not the “war to end all wars,” and the world it created was not ideal.  In the context of the Lost Generation, Grubb wrote his most famous hymn, “Our God, to Whom We Turn.”

Grubb, aged 84 years, died on January 23, 1939.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 31, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT NICODEMUS, DISCIPLE OF JESUS

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Edward Grubb and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of John Greenleaf Whittier (December 7)   4 comments

Above:  John Greenleaf Whittier

Image in the Public Domain

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JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER (DECEMBER 7, 1807-SEPTEMBER 7, 1892)

U.S. Quaker Abolitionist, Poet, and Hymn Writer

John Greenleaf Whittier was one of the greatest American poets of the nineteenth century.

Whittier, born and raised in a Quaker family on a farm near Haverhill, Massachusetts, on December 7, 1807, worked hard as a youth.  He was a farmer, of course, but was also a cobbler.  (Farming was not his sole concern, although he remained a grounded person.)  Our saint had little formal education–a few terms at Haverhill Academy, actually.  While there, he began to write.  William Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879) made Whittier a published poet in the Newburyport Free Press, in 1826.  The two men became lifelong friends in 1829.

Whittier’s friendship with Garrison advanced our saint professionally.  In 1829 Garrison helped Whittier become the editor of The American Manufacturer, Boston, Massachusetts.  This was a politically Whig publication that focused on industrial and agricultural interests.  While editor of The American Manufacturer, Whittier became involved in the abolitionist movement.  Our saint went on to edit The New England Weekly Review (1830-1832), The Pennsylvania Freeman (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1838-1840), and The Middlesex Standard (Lowell, Massachusetts, 1844-1845), as well as to join the staff of The Washington National Era (1847-1869).

Whittier put his literary skills to work in the service of abolitionism in other ways, too.  He wrote Justice and Expediency (1833), a best-selling pamphlet.  That year, as the secretary of the Anti-Slavery Convention, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, our saint helped to draft the declaration of principles.  Four years later, he published Poems Written During the Progress of the Abolitionist Cause in the United States.

Whittier did more than write and edit.  In 1835 he won a seat in the Massachusetts legislature.  The following year, he became the secretary of the American Anti-Slavery Society.  In 1835 and 1838 Whittier experienced pro-slavery mob violence–first in Concord, New Hampshire.  Three years later, he witnessed the burning of the offices of The Pennsylvania Freeman.

Throughout mob violence and the United States Civil War Whittier, a womb-to-tomb Quaker, remained a staunch pacifist.  Although he preferred secession to war, he welcomed Confederate defeat at the end of that war.

Whittier became more radical as he aged.  By the end of his life, he had abandoned enough of his former, traditional ideas about gender to support women’s suffrage.

Whittier also composed religious poems, some of which congregations sang as hymns, starting during his lifetime.  He denied being a hymn writer, though; his Quaker congregations did not sing hymns.  Nevertheless, generations of Christians have sung some of his texts, including “Dear Lord and Father of Mankind,” as hymns.

Whittier moved in with three female cousins in Danvers, Massachusetts, in 1876.  He died in Hampton Falls, New York, on September 7, 1892.  He was 86 years old.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 26, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ISABEL FLORENCE HAPGOOD, U.S. JOURNALIST, TRANSLATOR, AND ECUMENIST

THE FEAST OF SAINT ANDRA GIACINTO LONGHIN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF TREVISO

THE FEAST OF PHILIP DODDRIDGE, ENGLISH CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF VIRGIL MICHEL, U.S. ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK, ACADEMIC, AND PIONEER OF LITURGICAL RENEWAL

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring John Greenleaf Whittier

and all those who with words have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior, who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 728

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Feast of Dora Greenwell (March 29)   Leave a comment

I Both Hold and am Held

Above:  I Both Hold And Am Held

Image in the Public Domain

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DORA GREENWELL (DECEMBER 6, 1821-MARCH 29, 1882)

Poet and Devotional Writer

These days, in most of the Western World, women have professional opportunities due to the successes of feminism.  But Dora Greenwell did not live during a time in which she could enjoy these advantages.  Her legacy, however, was–and is–quite impressive.

Dora Greenwell was a sister of two priests of The Church of England.  William, eventually Dean of Durham Cathedral, and Alan, Rector of Golborne then Clifton.  From 1848 to 1854 Dora lived with one brother then the other, helping in the work of each sibling’s parish.  Then, in 1854-1872, she lived with her widowed mother at Durham.  From 1872 to 1881 Dora resided at Tarquay then Clifton the  London, advocating for proper mental health care.  In 1881 an accident led to her death, which occurred at Alan’s home at Clifton, near Bristol.

Dora published volumes of poetry:

  • Carmina Crucis (1869);
  • Songs of Salvation (1873);
  • The Soul’s Legend (1873); and
  • Camera Obsucra (1876).

She also published volumes of devotional prose:

  • A Present Heaven;
  • The Covenant of Life and Peace;
  • Two Friends;
  • Essays;
  • Liber Humanitatis;
  • The Life of John Woolman;
  • The Life of Lacordaire;
  • Colloquia Crucis; and
  • The Patience of Hope, which John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892) classed with devotional classics.

She wrote extensively on the Atonement.  Dora’s chosen symbol was Luther’s heart set against a black cross amid white roses–thereby signifying the joy, peace, and consolation found in Christ’s cross.  The poet, referring to her position relative to the cross, said,

I both hold and am held.

One of the texts in Songs of Salvation (1873) was “I Am Not Skilled to Understand,” the text of which follows:

I am not skilled to understand

What God hath willed, what God hath planned;

I only know at His right hand

Stands One who is my Saviour.

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I take God at His word and deed:

“Christ died to save me”–this I read;

And in my heart I find a need

Of Him to be my Saviour.

—–

And was there no other way

For God to take?–I cannot say;

I only  bless Him, day by day,

Who saved me through my Saviour.

—–

That He should leave His place on high

And come for sinful man to die,

You count it strange?–so do not I,

Since I have known my Saviour.

—–

And O that He fulfilled may see

The travail of His soul in me,

And with His work contented be,

As I with my dear Saviour!

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Yea, living, dying, let me bring,

My strength, my solace, from this spring,

That He who lives to be my King

Once died to be my Saviour.

Amen.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 31, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF CHARLES FREDERICK MACKENZIE, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF CENTRAL AFRICA

THE FEAST OF MENNO SIMONS, MENNONITE LEADER

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Almighty God, beautiful in majesty, majestic in holiness:

You have shown us the splendor of creation in the work of your servant Dora Greenwell.

Teach us to drive from this world all chaos and disorder,

that our eyes may behold your glory,

and that at last everyone may know the inexhaustible richness of your new creation

in Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Isaiah 28:5-6 or Hosea 14:5-8 or 2 Chronicles 20:20-21

Psalm 96

Philippians 4:8-9 or Ephesians 5:18b-20

Matthew 13:44-52

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 61

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Revised on December 24, 2016

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