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Feast of the Martyrs of New Guinea, 1942 and 1943 (September 2)   Leave a comment

Above:  Australia and New Guinea, 1951

Scanned from Hammond’s Complete World Atlas (1951), 104

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THE MARTYRS OF NEW GUINEA (AUGUST 1942-OCTOBER 1943)

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We must endeavour to carry on our work.  God expects this of us.  The church at home, which sent us out, expects it of us.  The universal church expects it of us.  We could ever hold up our faces again if, for our own safety, we all forsook Him and fled, when the shadows of the Passion began to gather around Him in His spiritual and mystical body, the Church in Papua.

–Philip Strong, Anglican Bishop of New Guinea

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Sometimes fidelity to the Gospel of Christ has entailed martyrdom.  It did for many people around the globe during World War II.  For example, on the island of New Guinea, the Japanese invasion (July 22, 1942) preceded the martyrdom of ten Australian Anglican missionaries and two Papuan Anglicans, who risked their lives to witness for Jesus.  Natives suffered under the occupation; Anglican missionaries remained with them.

The feast, as it stands in The Episcopal Church, does not include the two saints martyred in 1943.

The martyrs of August 1942 were:

  1. Henry Matthews, a priest at Port Moresby;
  2. Leslie Gariardi, a Papuan teacher at Port Moresby;
  3. May “Merry” Hayman, a native of Adelaide, and a nurse; and
  4. Mavis Parkinson, a native of Ipswich, Queensland.

Japanese forces executed Hayman and Parkinson near present-day Popondetta.

The martyrs of September 2, 1942, were:

  1. Henry Holland, a priest;
  2. Lucien Tapiedi, their Papuan guide now commemorated with a statue in Westminster Abbey, London;
  3. Lilla Lashmar, from Prospect, South Australia, and a teacher;
  4. Margery Brenchley, an English emigrant to Australia, and a nurse;
  5. John Duffill, a native of Queensland; and
  6. Vivien Redlich, an English-born priest, a former member of the Bush Brotherhood, and the fiancé of May “Merry” Hayman.

Japanese forces executed them at Buna Beach.

The martyrs of 1943 were:

  1. Bernard Moore, a priest; and
  2. John Barge, an English-born priest.

They were friends.  Moore had an opportunity to flee to a safe place honorably, but he remained to help his friend, Barge.  Moore apparently died of malaria or another disease.  Barge became a martyr at Japanese hands in October 1943.

While preparing this post I relied primarily on Margaret Bride‘s I Wait for the Lord; My Soul Waits for Him:  And in His Word is My Hope.

I encourage you, O reader, to click on the link above and read that excellent resource.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 18, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF BARTHOLOMÉ DE LAS CASAS, “APOSTLE TO THE INDIANS”

THE FEAST OF ARTHUR PENRHYN STANLEY, ANGLICAN DEAN OF WESTMINSTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDWARD WILLIAM LEINBACH, U.S. MORAVIAN MUSICIAN AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF ELIZABETH FERARD, FIRST DEACONESS IN THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND

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Almighty God, we remember before you this day the blessed martyrs of New Guinea who,

following the example of their Savior, laid down their lives for their friends;

and we pray that we who honor their memory may imitate their loyalty and faith;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 22:11-13

Psalm 126

1 Thessalonians 5:21b-24

Luke 12:4-12

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 557

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