Archive for the ‘Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (New School)’ Tag

Feast of George Duffield, Jr., and Samuel Duffield (July 6)   1 comment

Samuel Duffield

Above:  Samuel Duffield

Image Source = http://www.hymntime.com/tch/bio/d/u/f/duffield_saw.htm

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GEORGE DUFFIELD, JR. (SEPTEMBER 11, 1818-JULY 6, 1888)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

father of

SAMUEL AUGUSTUS WILLOUGHBY DUFFIELD (SEPTEMBER 24, 1843-MAY 12, 1887)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer

Sometimes, as I research a proposed saint whose name I found somewhere, the trail leads me to at least one other remarkable person.  That happened as I read about George Duffield, Jr. (1818-1888); I learned about his son, Samuel, also.

The Duffield family produced a lineage of distinguished Presbyterian clergymen.  One George Duffield (1732-1790) served in the Continental Army as a chaplain during the U.S. War for Independence.  His grandson, George Duffield, Sr. (1796-1868), was the 1862 Moderator of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (New School) (1838-1869).  From that stock came George Duffield, Jr.

George Jr., born at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, graduated from Yale University and Union Theological Seminary.  His ministerial career, spent building up small congregations while relying on his wealth to sustain himself financially, was as follows:

  1. Fifth Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, New York (1840-1847);
  2. First Presbyterian Church, Bloomfield, New Jersey (1847-1852);
  3. Central Presbyterian Church of the Northern Liberties, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1852-1861);
  4. Adrian, Michigan (1861-1865);
  5. Second Presbyterian Church, Galesburg, Illinois (1865-1869);
  6. Saginaw, Michigan (1869); and
  7. Ann Arbor and Lansing, Michigan (1869-1884).

George Jr. retired in 1884 and spent his final years with his son, Samuel, whom he survived by slightly less than one year.

Samuel Augustus Willoughby Duffield (1843-1887), born in Brooklyn, New York, graduated from Yale University in 1863.  He, licensed to preach in 1866 and ordained the following year, served in the following places:

  1. Bergers, New Jersey;
  2. Ann Arbor, Michigan;
  3. Altoona, Pennsylvania; and
  4. Westminster Presbyterian Church, Bloomfield, New Jersey (1881-1887).

He, a translator and author of hymns, was also a scholar of hymnody.  His publications included:

  1. A translation of Bernard’s Hora Novissima (1867);
  2. Warp and Woof:  A Book of Verse (1868);
  3. The Burial of the Dead (1882);
  4. English Hymns:  Their Authors and History (1886); and
  5. Latin Hymn Writers and Their Hymns (1889).

I excavated one of Samuel’s hymns, “Oh, Land Relieved from Sorrow,” from the Southern Presbyterian Hymns of the Ages (1891):

Oh, land relieved from sorrow!

Oh, land secure from tears!

Oh, respite on the morrow

From all the toil of years!

To thee we hasten ever,

To thee our steps ascend,

Where darkness cometh never,

And joy shall never end.

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Oh, happy, holy, portal

For God’s own blest elect:

Oh, region, pure, immortal,

With better spring bedecked:

Thy pearly doors for ever

Their welcome shall extend,

Where darkness cometh never,

And joy shall never end.

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Oh, home where God the Father

Takes all His children in:

Where Christ the Son shall gather

The sinners saved from sin:

No might nor fear shall sever

A friend from any friend,

For darkness cometh never,

And joy shall never end.

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Rise, then, O brightest morning!

Come, then, triumphant day!

When into new adorning

We change and pass away:

For so with firm endeavor

Our spirits gladly tend

Where darkness cometh never,

And joy shall never end.

Samuel took after his father, George Jr., who also wrote hymn texts.  One of these was “Blessed Saviour, Thee I Love.”  Another was “Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus,” with an interesting origin story and two more stanzas than most hymnals publish these days.  George Jr. was active in the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) at Philadelphia.  One of his dearest friends there was Dudley A. Tyng, an Episcopal priest also active in the YMCA.  One day in 1858 Tyng suffered a sudden and fatal accident.  He did have enough time to send a message to his fellow clergymen.

Tell them to stand up for Jesus,

he said.  George Jr., moved by the loss of his friend, wrote the famous hymns.  “Stand Up, Stand Up for Jesus,” customarily four stanzas long in hymnals, was originally six stanzas long:

Stand up, stand up for Jesus,

Ye soldiers of the cross;

Lift high His royal banner,

It must not suffer loss:

From victory to victory

His army shall He lead,

Till every foe is vanquished,

And Christ is Lord indeed.

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Stand up, stand up for Jesus!

The solemn watchword hear,

If while ye sleep He suffers,

Away with shame and fear;

Wherein ye meet with evil,

Within you or without,

Charge for the God of Battles,

And put the foe to rout!

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Stand up, stand up for Jesus!

The trumpet call obey;

Forth to the mighty conflict,

In this His glorious day:

Ye that are men now serve Him

Against unnumbered foes;

Let courage rise with danger,

And strength to strength oppose.

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Stand up, stand up for Jesus!

Stand in His strength alone;

The arm of flesh will fail you,

Ye dare not trust your own:

Put on the gospel armor,

Each piece put on with prayer;

Where duty calls, or danger,

Be never wanting there.

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Stand up, stand up for Jesus!

Each soldier to his post;

Close up the broken column,

And shout through all the host!

Make good the loss so heavy,

In those that still remain,

And prove to all around you

That death itself is gain!

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Stand up, stand up for Jesus!

The strife will not be long;

This day the noise of battle,

The next the victor’s song:

To Him that overcometh

A crown of life shall be;

He with the King of Glory

Shall reign eternally.

This hymn debuted in print in Lyra Sacra Americana (1868), on pages 99 and 100.

Families ought to propagate healthy faith.  The Duffields nurtured faith across generational lines and did much to feed it in many others down the corridors of time.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JANUARY 21, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS MIROCLES OF MILAN AND EPIPHANIUS OF PAVIA, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS

THE FEAST OF SAINT AGNES, MARTYR AT ROME

THE FEAST OF SAINTS ALBAN ROE AND THOMAS REYNOLDS, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIESTS AND MARTYRS

THE FEAST OF SAINT GASPAR DEL BUFALO, FOUNDER OF THE MISSIONARIES OF THE PRECIOUS BLOOD

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

George Duffield, Jr.; Samuel Duffield; and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Samuel Hanson Cox and Arthur Cleveland Coxe (July 20)   2 comments

4a11791v

Above:  Library, New York University, 1904

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-det-4a11791

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SAMUEL HANSON COX (SR.) (AUGUST 25, 1793-OCTOBER 2, 1880)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Abolitionist

father of

ARTHUR CLEVELAND COXE (MAY 10, 1818-JULY 20, 1896)

Episcopal Bishop of Western New York, Hymn Writer, and Translator of Hymns

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Today I add a father and a son to the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.

Samuel Hanson Cox (1793-1880), born in Rahway, New Jesey, grew up a Quaker.  He renounced that denomination to serve in the United States armed forces during the War of 1812.  After that conflict Cox became a Presbyterian minister, serving at Mendham, New Jersey (1817-1821) then at the City of New York (1821-1834).  In 1932 he cofounded the University of the City of New York, now New York University, where he taught theology.  Cox’s opposition to slavery offended a sufficient number of people that a mob sacked his home and church building during the anti-abolitionist riots in 1834, forcing him to leave the city for safety.  So Cox became the pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Brooklyn, not yet part of the City of New York.  He also began to teach Ecclesiastical History at the Union Theological Seminary in time.  Cox, a prominent New School Presbyterian, served as the Moderator of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (New School) in 1849-1850.

[Historical Note:  The organizational roots of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (1789-1838) went back to 1706, when The Church of Scotland founded the Presbytery of Philadelphia.  The PCUSA (1789-1838) divided over, among other things, the Second Great Awakening.  The Old School opposed it while the New School accommodated itself to the movement.  Just to confuse people, I suppose, each body which formed from the 1838 schism called itself simply the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.  The New School divided over slavery 1858, with the United Synod of the South forming.  The Old School split likewise in 1861, spawning the Presbyterian Church in the Confederate States of America.  The PCCSA absorbed the United Synod of the South in 1864 and renamed itself the Presbyterian Church in the United States (PCUS) in 1865, after the Confederacy had ceased to exist.  The two PCUSAs reunited in 1869-1870 as the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. (what else?).  This body merged with the United Presbyterian Church of North America in 1958 to create The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., which reunited with the almost entirely Southern PCUS in 1983 to form the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).]

Cox retired in 1854.  He died at Broxville, New York, in 1880.

Cox had two sons, both of whom became Episcopal clergymen and added “e” to the last name.  One son, Samuel Hanson Coxe, Jr., served parishes in the State of New York.  The other son, Arthur Cleveland Coxe, rose to the office of bishop.

Arthur Cleveland Coxe was born at Mendham, New Jersey, in 1818, during his father’s tenure as the Presbyterian minister there.  Coxe attended the University of the City of New York, which his father had cofounded.  Coxe published throughout his life, beginning with poetry during his freshman year of college.  He graduated in 1838 then matriculated at General Theological Seminary.  Coxe, ordained to the Diaconate in 1841 and the Priesthood the next year, served at St. John’s Church, Hartford, Connecticut, from 1842 to 1854; Grace Church, Baltimore, Maryland, from 1854 to 1863; and Calvary Episcopal Church, New York, New York, from 1863 to 1865.  In 1865 Coxe became the Bishop Coadjutor of Western New York, having already declined an opportunity to become the Bishop of Texas.  His tenure as Bishop Coadjutor lasted for just a few months, for the bishop died, making Coxe the next bishop, a post he held for the rest of his life.

Coxe published prose and poetry, including hymns.  He wrote the following text in 1850:

Saviour, sprinkle many nations,

Fruitful let Thy sorrows be;

By Thy pains and consolations

Draw the Gentiles unto Thee.

Of Thy cross, the wondrous story,

Be it to the nations told;

Let them see Thee in Thy glory

And Thy mercy manifold.

—–

Far and wide, though all unknowing,

Pants for Thee each mortal breast;

Human tears for Thee are flowing,

Human hearts in Thee would rest.

Thirsting, as for dews of even,

As the new-mown grass for rain,

Thee they seek as God of heaven,

Thee as man for sinners slain.

—–

Saviour, lo!  the isles are waiting,

Stretched the hand and stained the sight,

For Thy Spirit, new-creating,

Love’s pure flame and wisdom’s light;

Give the word, and of the preacher

Speed the foot and tough the tongue,

Till on earth by every creature

Glory to the Lamb be sung.

Coxe was a humble man, one who, until the last four years of his life, refused to let any of his hymns appear in official Episcopal hymnals, even though he served on the denominational Hymnal Commission.  Of Coxe Robert Guy McCutchan wrote the following:

Bishop Coxe was a man of unusual gifts:  great personal charm, wonderful eloquence, a scholar of distinction, and a poet whose master-motive was his love of Christ, his love of souls.

Our Hymnody:  A Manual of The Methodist Hymnal, 2d. ed.  (Nashville, TN:  Abingdon Press, 1937, pages 149-150)

Bishop Coxe spoke out on a variety of issues.  He opposed any translation of the Bible other than the Authorized (King James) Version. (I disagree with him on that point.  That translation is, for me, properly a museum piece.)  He also opposed the dogma of the Immaculate Conception and defended the Apostolic nature of Anglican orders.  (I agree with him on both of those counts.)  But, regardless of how much I agree or disagree with Bishop Coxe, I honor him for his work for God.  And I honor his father’s efforts for God and the enslaved.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MAY 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT ALCUIN OF YORK, DEACON AND ABBOT

THE FEAST OF SAINT HELENA, MOTHER OF EMPEROR CONSTANTINE I

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For Further Reading:

Samuel Hanson Cox:

http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/browse?type=lcsubc&key=Cox%2C%20Samuel%20H.%20(Samuel%20Hanson)%2C%201793-1880&c=x

Arthur Cleveland Coxe:

http://anglicanhistory.org/usa/accoxe/

http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Coxe%2C%20A.%20Cleveland%20(Arthur%20Cleveland)%2C%201818-1896

http://anglicanhistory.org/usa/wcdoane/coxe1896.html

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Heavenly Father, shepherd of your people, we thank you for your servants

Samuel Hanson Cox and Arthur Cleveland Coxe,

who were faithful in the care and nurture of your flock.

We pray that, following their examples and the teachings of their holy lives,

we may by your grace attain our full maturity in Christ,

through the same Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.  

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3:14-21

John 21:15-17 or Matthew 24:42-47

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60