Archive for the ‘St. Gall’ Tag

Feast of St. Nicetius of Trier and St. Aredius of Limoges (December 5)   Leave a comment

Above:  Gaul in 561

SAINT NICETIUS OF TRIER (513-CIRCA 566)

Roman Catholic Monk, Abbot, and Bishop

converted

SAINT AREDIUS OF LIMOGES (CIRCA 510-591)

Also known as Saint Yrieux of Limoges

Roman Catholic Abbot

His feast transferred from August 25

St. Nicetius of Trier (513-circa 566), born at Auvergne, Gaul, was a very important figure in the Gallic church.  He was probably related to St. Sidonius Apollinaris, Bishop of Auvergne and another major figure.  St. Nicetius, a monk then abbot at Limoges, became Bishop of Trier.  King Theodoric I of Metz (reigned 511-534) chose him over St. Gall, hardly a minor figure himself.

As Bishop of Trier St. Nicetius did much good work.  Among other things, he

  • rebuilt the cathedral and city fortifications of Trier,
  • restored discipline among his priests, and
  • founded a school for the training priests.

He was also pious, fasting often.  The bishop denounced Lothair I (reigned 511-561), King of Soissons from 511 and King of all Franks from 558, going so far as to excommunicate the monarch who had family members killed for personal gain.  Lothair exiled the bishop in 560, but the next ruler in that region of Gaul, Sigibert I of Austrasia (reigned 561-575) recalled St. Nicetius.  The bishop also criticized Byzantine Emperor Justinian I “the Great” (reigned 527-565) for being a semi-monophysite.

St. Magnericus succeeded St. Nicetius as Bishop of Trier.

St. Gregory of Tours wrote a biography of St. Nicetius of Trier. His source was St. Aredius of Limoges (circa 510-591), who had converted to Christianity under St. Nicetius.  St. Aredius, a former Chancellor to King Theudebert I of Metz (reigned 534-548), had been born into a wealthy family with connections to the late Western Roman Empire.  Raised at Vigoges monastery from boyhood, St. Aredius arrived at Metz at age fourteen.  After he let Metz St. Aredius traveled to Trier, where he met St. Nicetius.  The rest was history.  And St. Aredius served as abbot at Limoges and founded Altanum monastery.

One man’s sanctity influenced that of another.  And his example helped many others along the road to holiness.

Each of us is a link in a chain.  May this be a chain of holiness.  And may we be the strongest links possible, by grace.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 16, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARGARET OF SCOTLAND, QUEEN

THE FEAST OF SAINT GIUSEPPE MOSCATI, PHYSICIAN

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O God, by whose grace your servants Saint Nicetius of Trier and Saint Aredius of Limoges,

kindled with the flame of your love, became burning and shining lights in your Church:

Grant that we may also be aflame with the spirit of love and discipline, and walk before you as children of light,

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Acts 2:42-47a

Psalm 133 or 34:1-8 or 119:161-168

2 Corinthians 6:1-10

Matthew 6:24-33

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 723

Feast of Sts. Deicola, Gall, and Othmar (January 19)   1 comment

Above:  Plan of the Abbey of St. Gall, St. Gallen, Switzerland

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT DEICOLA (530-625)

Roman Catholic Monk

His feast transferred from January 18

brother of 

SAINT GALL (550-CIRCA 646)

Roman Catholic Monk

His feast transferred from October 16

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SAINT OTHMAR (CIRCA 689-CIRCA 759)

Roman Catholic Abbot at St. Gallen

His feast transferred from November 16

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St. Deicola and St. Gall, Irish brothers and monks, accompanied St. Columban  on his missionary journey to Europe.  Theuderic II of Burgundy and Austrasia expelled the St. Deicola, the elder brother, at age 80, as well as St. Columban, in 610.  St. Deicola settled at Lure, Gaul, where he founded a monastery and devoted the remaining years of his life to prayer and meditation.  Illness forced St. Gall to break way from St. Columban’s main missionary band in 612.  The latter traveled to Italy, but the former and some hermits settled in the area of Lake Constance, in modern-day Switzerland.

St. Othmar founded the great Abbey of St. Gall and became its first abbot.  He and his monks cared for the poor of the surrounding community, operated a hospital, and established the first Swiss leper colony.  St. Othmar died in exile because of false accusations two nobles had made against him.  His good deeds, alas, did not prevent him from suffering due to the perfidy of others.

From the Abbey of St. Gall generations of faithful monks did great things for God.  Consider the cases of St. Tutilo and St. Nokter Balbulus, for example.

What will your legacy be?

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 29, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF GEORGE DAWSON, ENGLISH BAPTIST AND UNITARIAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF DOROTHY DAY, SOCIAL ACTIVIST

THE FEAST OF THE INAUGURATION OF THE CHURCH OF NORTH INDIA, 1970

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O God,

whose blessed Son became poor that we through his poverty might be rich:

Deliver us from an inordinate love of this world,

that we, inspired by the devotion of your servants Saints Deicola, Gall, and Othmar,

may serve you with singleness of heart,

and attain to the riches of the age to come;

through Jesus Christ our Lord,

who lives and reigns with you,

in the unity of the Holy Spirit,

one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Song of Songs 8:6-7

Psalm 34 or 34:1-8

Philippians 3:7-15

Luke 12:33-37 or Luke 9:57-62

–Adapted from The Book of Common Prayer (1979), pages 249 and 927

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Revised on November 20, 2016

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