Archive for the ‘St. Magnericus of Trier’ Tag

Feast of St. Nicetius of Trier and St. Aredius of Limoges (December 5)   Leave a comment

Above:  Gaul in 561

SAINT NICETIUS OF TRIER (513-CIRCA 566)

Roman Catholic Monk, Abbot, and Bishop

converted

SAINT AREDIUS OF LIMOGES (CIRCA 510-591)

Also known as Saint Yrieux of Limoges

Roman Catholic Abbot

His feast transferred from August 25

St. Nicetius of Trier (513-circa 566), born at Auvergne, Gaul, was a very important figure in the Gallic church.  He was probably related to St. Sidonius Apollinaris, Bishop of Auvergne and another major figure.  St. Nicetius, a monk then abbot at Limoges, became Bishop of Trier.  King Theodoric I of Metz (reigned 511-534) chose him over St. Gall, hardly a minor figure himself.

As Bishop of Trier St. Nicetius did much good work.  Among other things, he

  • rebuilt the cathedral and city fortifications of Trier,
  • restored discipline among his priests, and
  • founded a school for the training priests.

He was also pious, fasting often.  The bishop denounced Lothair I (reigned 511-561), King of Soissons from 511 and King of all Franks from 558, going so far as to excommunicate the monarch who had family members killed for personal gain.  Lothair exiled the bishop in 560, but the next ruler in that region of Gaul, Sigibert I of Austrasia (reigned 561-575) recalled St. Nicetius.  The bishop also criticized Byzantine Emperor Justinian I “the Great” (reigned 527-565) for being a semi-monophysite.

St. Magnericus succeeded St. Nicetius as Bishop of Trier.

St. Gregory of Tours wrote a biography of St. Nicetius of Trier. His source was St. Aredius of Limoges (circa 510-591), who had converted to Christianity under St. Nicetius.  St. Aredius, a former Chancellor to King Theudebert I of Metz (reigned 534-548), had been born into a wealthy family with connections to the late Western Roman Empire.  Raised at Vigoges monastery from boyhood, St. Aredius arrived at Metz at age fourteen.  After he let Metz St. Aredius traveled to Trier, where he met St. Nicetius.  The rest was history.  And St. Aredius served as abbot at Limoges and founded Altanum monastery.

One man’s sanctity influenced that of another.  And his example helped many others along the road to holiness.

Each of us is a link in a chain.  May this be a chain of holiness.  And may we be the strongest links possible, by grace.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 16, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARGARET OF SCOTLAND, QUEEN

THE FEAST OF SAINT GIUSEPPE MOSCATI, PHYSICIAN

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O God, by whose grace your servants Saint Nicetius of Trier and Saint Aredius of Limoges,

kindled with the flame of your love, became burning and shining lights in your Church:

Grant that we may also be aflame with the spirit of love and discipline, and walk before you as children of light,

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Acts 2:42-47a

Psalm 133 or 34:1-8 or 119:161-168

2 Corinthians 6:1-10

Matthew 6:24-33

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 723

Feast of Sts. Gregory of Langres, Terticus of Langres, Gallus of Clermont, Gregory of Tours, Avitus I of Clermont, Magnericus of Trier, and Gaugericus (January 4)   5 comments

Above:  The Flag of Vatican City

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT GALLUS OF CLERMONT (CIRCA 489-CIRCA 553)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Clermont (527-551)

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SAINT GREGORY OF LANGRES (DIED 539)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Langres (506-539)

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SAINT TERTICUS OF LANGRES (DIED 572)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Langres (539-572)

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SAINT GREGORY OF TOURS (540-594)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Tours (573-593)

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SAINT MAGNERICUS OF TRIER (DIED 596)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Trier (566-596)

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SAINT AVITUS I OF CLERMONT (DIED 600)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Clermont

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SAINT GAUGERICUS (DIED CIRCA 625)

Roman Catholic Bishop of Cambrai then Arras (586-Circa 625)

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Each of the saints whose stories I have combined into this post has his own feast day on the Roman Catholic calendar.  This, however, is my calendar, so they share January 4 on the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.

St. Gregory of Langres (died 539) was a Bishop of Langres (from 506 to 539), a civic governor of the Autun region in Gaul (now France), father of St. Terticus, the next Bishop of Langres, and great-uncle of St. Gregory of Tours.  He insisted on public order and had a reputation as a kind minister.

Of St. Terticus of Langres (died 572) we know little.  The son of St. Gregory of Langres, he was Bishop of Langres from 539 to 572 and an uncle of St. Gregory of Tours.

St. Gregory of Tours (540-594), born George Florentius, took the name Gregory to honor his great-uncle, St. Gregory of Langres.   The great-nephew served as Bishop of Tours from 573 to 593.  He wrote lives of the saints and accounts of his time.  His works continue to provide invaluable information about certain saints and Merovingian France.  He also wrote a biography of another uncle, his teacher, St. Gallus of Clermont.  The great-nephew was also a friend of St. Magnericus of Trier.

St. Avitus I of Clermont (died 600) was another friend and mentor of St. Gregory of Tours.  Avitus, while a priest at Tours, led St. Gregory of Tours in Bible studies.  Avitus also ordained St. Greogry of Tours to the diaconate.

St. Gallus of Clermont (circa 489-circa 553) served as Bishop of Clermont from 527 to 551.  Born into a Roman senatorial family, he entered a monastery at Cournon against his family’s wishes.  He received their consent in time.  The saint’s piety and intelligence commended him to Quintianus, Bishop of Clermont, who ordained him priest.  St. Gallus was a prisoner of King Theodoric I of Austrasia (mostly in modern-day Germany and Belgium) for a few years.  Then he returned to Clermont, where he succeeded Quintianus as Bishop of Clermont and defended church rights against royal encroachments.  The saint also had a reputation for great kindness and holiness.

St. Magnericus of Trier (died July 25, 596) grew up in Trier.  A friend of St. Gregory of Tours, he became a priest by the hand of Nicetius, Bishop of Trier.  King Clotaire I, excommunicated by Nicetius, exiled the bishop.  Magnericus accompanied his bishop into exile and returned one year later.  The saint became Bishop of Trier in 566.  He granted sanctuary to King Theodore of Marseilles in 585.  Guntham of Burgundy had forced Theodore into exile.  The saint interceded with King Childebert II on Theodore’s behalf.  The saint also ordained St. Gaugericus.

St. Gaugericus (died circa 625) learned the entire Book of Psalms by heart. He became Bishop of Cambrai (in 586) then Arras.  The saint convinced many people to destroy their idols and destroyed many other idols himself.  He also ransomed many prisoners.

These saints constitute a chain of holiness.  Some of them knew and/or were related to each other, but each was linked directly or indirectly to the others.  These interlocking stories teach the importance of influencing others positively.  They also tell us that the legacy of lived holiness extends generations beyond one’s life.  So may we take comfort from this reality and strive to do the best we can, empowered by God, and take courage that what we  do for God is never in vain, regardless of what appearances might indicate.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2011 COMMON ERA

THE FIRST SUNDAY OF ADVENT, YEAR B

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Heavenly Father, shepherd of your people,

we thank you for your servants

Saint Gregory of Langres,

Saint Terticus of Langres,

Saint Gregory of Tours,

St. Gallus of Clermont,

St. Avitus I of Clermont,

St. Magnericus of Trier,

and St. Gaugericus,

who were faithful in the care and nurture of your flock.

We pray that, following their examples and the teaching of their holy lives,

we may by your grace attain our full maturity in Christ,

through the same Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16 or Acts 20:17-35

Psalm 84

1 Peter 5:1-4 or Ephesians 3:14-21

John 21:15-17 or Matthew 24:42-47

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

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Revised on November 12, 2016

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