Archive for the ‘Communion of Saints’ Category

Renovation of My Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days: The October Phase   Leave a comment

Above:  October, by Pieter Stevens; Engraved by Egidius Sadeler

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-pga-12533

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

THE PROCESS CONTINUES

A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, in Version Mu during 2018, is about as old as this weblog, which dates to July 27, 2009.  (I like the Greek alphabet, obviously.  Version Lambda was the 2017 iteration of my Ecumenical Calendar.  Version Nu will be the iteration during 2019.  If I keep going long enough, I will need to decide what to call the iteration after Version Omega.)  My Ecumenical Calendar is, by design, a perennial project, intended to be a work in progress for as long as I am able to update it.  I have no idea how long that will be, of course.

I have spent years revising and updating my Ecumenical Calendar, but I have been renovating it, the core of SUNDRY THOUGHTS, for about two years.  On November 11, 2016, I published the first post of the renovation project.  By the close of 2016 I had renovated the January and February portions of my Ecumenical Calendar.  The renovation of the March, April, and May portions followed in 2017.  As of the writing and publication of this post, I have completed the renovation of the calendar through September.

I predict that  will, before 2019 arrives, renovate the October portion, also.  A reasonable prediction, then, is that I will complete the renovation process during the first half of 2019.  After that, I predict, I will resume the process of revising and updating my Ecumenical Calendar, starting with January.

Part of the process of renovating my Ecumenical Calendar is changing dates on many posts, thereby redistributing them within a given month.  Doing so brings me to the reset stage of the process.  The October list, as it exists on September 13, 2018, reflects the reset stage.  (Later it will reflect the renovated reality.)  Given that I have imposed a limit of four posts per date for most dates, I keep moving through a month’s worth of posting instead of becoming bogged down.  I also have a finite member of vacancies to fill.  Some dates are full booked after I change dates on posts; others stand partially or fully vacant  before I start planning whom to add.

Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, approved at the most recent General Convention of The Episcopal Church, indicates a particular rationale governing the official denominational calendar:

…a balance of women and men, orders of ministry, races and ethnicities, and historical time periods.

–2

I understand that in the context of a denominational resource, but that a standard of maintaining balances does not apply to my Ecumenical Calendar, a hobby.  I am concentrating on proverbial trees, not the equally proverbial forest.  If I, for example, have three vacancies for a particular date, I examine ecclesiastical calendars of saints (of the Orthodox Church in America, the Roman Catholic Church, and various Anglican and Lutheran denominations), as well as the germane monthly list of names I have found in other sources. Often I follow set feast days from official calendars.  After I fill the vacancies I can, I move on to the next date and repeat the process.

I have created Plan A for renovating the October portion of my Ecumenical Calendar.  I have not mistaken this for the eventual result of my efforts, though.  Experience has taught me that some changes are inevitable, after all.

As an observant reader of this weblog knows or should know, I have other weblogs, too.  I am, for example, revising and updating ORDINARY TIME DEVOTIONS.  The process of doing so spills over to SUNDRY THOUGHTS and BLOGA THEOLOGICA.  In a composition book I have drafts of posts composed mainly for ORDINARY TIME DEVOTIONS and BLOGA THEOLOGICA.  Some are also for this weblog.

Those posts intended for three weblogs will debut here at SUNDRY THOUGHTS shortly, before I copy and paste them into BLOGA THEOLOGICA and, in time, ORDINARY TIME DEVOTIONS.  Then I will begin to prepare new posts about saints, beginning with those for October 1.

May you, O reader, find much that is spiritually beneficial.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 13, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF PETER OF CHELCIC, BOHEMIAN HUSSITE REFORMER; AND GREGORY THE PATRIARCH, FOUNDER OF THE MORAVIAN CHURCH

THE FEAST OF GODFREY THRING, ANGLICAN PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF JANE CREWDSON, ENGLISH QUAKER POET AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF NARAYAN SESHADRI OF JALNI, INDIAN PRESBYTERIAN EVANGELIST AND “APOSTLE TO THE MANGS”

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Advertisements

Posted September 13, 2018 by neatnik2009 in Communion of Saints, October

More Sources of Names for My Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days   Leave a comment

Above:  My Set of The Interpreter’s Bible, August 2, 2018

Photographer = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I have collected Biblical commentaries for years.  On occasion I have chosen a scholar, the author of multiple volumes in that collection, for inclusion on my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.  I have added Father Mitchell J. Dahood (1922-1982), for example.  Only this week, however, have I made a list of scholars–more than sixty of them–to consider.

I have drawn names for my Ecumenical Calendar from a variety of sources.

  1. I have consulted approved denominational calendars of saints (Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran), of course.  I have found them very helpful, but hardly comprehensive.  (I look forward to the final version of the Episcopal Lesser Feasts and Fasts 2018, due in book form next year, although I have downloaded the provisional version of it as a PDF.)
  2. I have also gotten much mileage out of Robert Ellsberg, All Saints:  Daily Reflections on Saints, Prophets, and Witnesses for Our Time (1997).  I purchased my copy at the Goodwill store on the east side of Athens, Georgia, on August 28, 2016, and have seldom gotten more value out of any book as I have from this one.
  3. I have found many names in hymnals, especially old ones.
  4. I have added public figures.
  5. I have added some people I have known.
  6. I have added people of whom I have read while preparing a post on another saint.
  7. I have added people I simply thought belonged on a calendar of saints.

The main source of “new” names is The Interpreter’s Bible, a classic set from the 1950s.  Other names on my list of Biblical scholars come from other Biblical commentaries.  I choose to focus on commentaries from a certain period (no later than the early 1980s, mainly), for one major requirement for addition to my Ecumenical Calendar is being dead.  (One scholar who contributed to The Interpreter’s Bible is still alive, by the way.)  I do not draw many names from The New Interpreter’s Bible (1990s-early 2000s), essential to my preparation of Sunday School lessons, because of the issue of most of those scholars still being alive.  I wish the contemporary scholars good health, a constant grasp of their faculties, and long life, but I will not write about them as saints as long as they breathe.

Above:  My Set of The New Interpreter’s Bible, August 2, 2018

Photographer = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

I have established a few rules to govern my Ecumenical Calendar.  One of those rules is that I have chosen not to write blurbs and call them posts.  I have therefore refused to consider some scholars and other people, on the grounds of lack of information.

I have, however, found sufficient information on three of the newly listed (for the purpose of consideration) scholars this week to draft posts adding them to my Ecumenical Calendar.  The experience of taking notes and synthesizing information was most pleasant and spiritually rewarding.

I have designed my Ecumenical Calendar to be an ongoing project, the end of which will be my death.  I have made long-term plans for the project, manifesting my desire to continue living for a long time.

Writing my Ecumenical Calendar is a spiritually rewarding hobby.  I pray that reading it is at least as spiritually rewarding for you, O member of my audience.

Pax vobiscum!

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 2, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF GEORG WEISSEL, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF ANNA BERNARDINE DOROTHY HOPPE, U.S. LUTHERAN HYMN WRITER AND TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF CHRISTIAN GOTTFRIED GEBHARD, GERMAN MORAVIAN COMPOSER AND MUSIC EDUCATOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT PETER JULIAN EYMARD, FOUNDER OF THE PRIESTS OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT, THE SERVANTS OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT, AND THE PRIESTS’ EUCHARISTIC LEAGUE; AND THE ORGANIZER OF THE CONFRATERNITY OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Posted August 2, 2018 by neatnik2009 in Communion of Saints

Tagged with ,

Time to Switch Gears   Leave a comment

Above:  Spur Gear

Image in the Public Domain

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

For more than a month I have focused on blogging about saints with feast days in August and late July.  I have, since I commenced blogging about saints with feast days in July, been writing and publishing hagiographies for more than three months, including some time off, to publish already-drafted lectionary-based devotions at LENTEN AND EASTER DEVOTIONS.

Certain activities edify me spiritually.  Worshiping as a member of my congregation (St. Gregory the Great Episcopal Church, Athens, Georgia) helps to ground me.  Serving (usually two Sundays a month) as a Eucharistic minister is meaningful to me, for I have, since my childhood as a United Methodist in rural southern Georgia (with infrequent Communion), felt closest to God when taking Communion.  Thus partaking of the Eucharist is crucial to my religious life.  Teaching Sunday School is a vocation I enjoy greatly.  Preparing hagiographies deepens my faith, for the lives of saints help me learn how to be a better Christian.  Studying the Bible with my intellect and spirituality fully engaged is also essential.

Above:  My Desk, Saturday, July 7, 2018

Photographer = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

Translations, from left to right:  TANAKH:  The Holy Scriptures (1985), The New American Bible (1991), The New Jerusalem Bible (1985), The New Revised Standard Version (1989), and The Revised English Bible (1989)

Reality requires me to choose my focus on one blogging project at a time.  I choose to focus next on drafting (in a composition book) devotional posts (based on Year A of the four-year lectionary by the Reverend Will Humes) for the Season after Pentecost 2019 at ORDINARY TIME DEVOTIONS.  The process of drafting these twenty-six posts (eleven of them already composed) should require just a few more days to complete, but the methodical and non-continuous process of updating ORDINARY TIME DEVOTIONS, scheduled to commence this summer, will properly end in early December.  Matters of the calendar, as it stands in relation of the post-1969 church calendar in most of Western Christianity, have given me a head start; five posts I have published at ADVENT, CHRISTMAS, AND EPIPHANY DEVOTIONS and one I have published at LENTEN AND EASTER DEVOTIONS can, slightly altered, transfer to ORDINARY TIME DEVOTIONS, bringing the count of new posts to thirty-two, not counting the six monthly guide posts (for June-November) and the new cap post (“Thank You for Visiting This Weblog”), intended to be temporary, deleted after a year or so.  That will be thirty-nine new posts, offset slightly by the deletion of the current cap post and the monthly guide posts for 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have made plans for renovating the September portion of my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.  Stage One, complete, was to edit extant posts, sometimes changing feast days.  Stage Two, also complete, was to prepare a list (in pencil) of people to consider adding to my Ecumenical Calendar, as well as posts to rewrite.  I have decided to write about saints with feast days in September between periods of working on ORDINARY TIME DEVOTIONS and BLOGA THEOLOGICA, on which I work in tandem with the lectionary-based devotional weblogs.

From time to time I will post here at SUNDRY THOUGHTS for other reasons also.

Until later….

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 8, 2018 COMMON ERA

PROPER 9:  THE SEVENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

THE FEAST OF GERALD FORD, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND AGENT OF NATIONAL HEALING; AND BETTY FORD, FIRST LADY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND ADVOCATE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE

THE FEAST OF ALBERT RHETT STUART, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF GEORGIA AND ADVOCATE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

THE FEAST OF GEORG NEUWARK, GERMAN LUTHERAN POET AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF GIOVANNI BATTISTA BONONCINI AND ANTONIO MARIA BONONCINI, ITALIAN COMPOSERS

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

July 12, 2018

Above:  Composition Book

Photographer = Kenneth Randolph Taylor

I have completed the process of drafting new posts for ORDINARY TIME DEVOTIONS.

The drafts, which I plan to publish in installments between this month and early December, fill the space between the bookmarks in the composition book in the photograph above.

KRT

July 12, 2018

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Happy Canada Day!   Leave a comment

Above:  The Flag of Canada

Image in the Public Domain

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

On Canada Day 2018 I wish my neighbors in the true north, strong and free, a happy Canada Day.  They reside in a fine country.  In that spirit I take this occasion to share links to some posts to statesmen and a stateswoman who helped to make and keep it the true north, strong and free:

  1. Prime Minister John Diefenbaker (1895-1979);
  2. Prime Minister Lester Pearson (1897-1972);
  3. Tommy Douglas (1904-1986), Federal Leader of the New Democratic Party;
  4. Flora MacDonald (1926-2015), Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, 1979-1980; and
  5. Jack Layton (1950-2011), Federal Leader of the New Democratic Party.

By the numbers two of them came from the New Democratic Party, two from the Progressive Conservative Party, and one from the Liberal Party.  Starting in the 1980s Canadian conservative politics became too right-wing for MacDonald, who, at the end of her days, was voting New Democratic.  MacDonald’s former boss, Prime Minister Joe Clark (in that office for nine months in 1979-1980), twice the leader of the Progressive Conservative Party, refused to join the merged Conservative Party under the leadership of Stephen Harper and, in retirement, has addressed the Green Party.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 1, 2018 COMMON ERA

PROPER 8:  THE SIXTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, YEAR B

THE FEAST OF LYMAN BEECHER, U.S. CONGREGATIONALIST AND PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER, AND ABOLITIONIST; FATHER OF HARRIET BEECHER STOWE, U.S. NOVELIST, HYMN WRITER, AND ABOLITIONIST; SISTER OF HENRY WARD BEECHER, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN AND CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER, AND ABOLITIONIST

THE FEAST OF CATHERINE WINKWORTH, TRANSLATOR OF HYMNS; AND JOHN MASON NEALE, ANGLICAN PRIEST, HYMN WRITER, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF JOHN CHANDLER, ANGLICAN PRIEST, SCHOLAR, AND TRANSLATOR OF HYMNS

THE FEAST OF PAULI MURRAY, CIVIL RIGHTS ATTORNEY AND EPISCOPAL PRIEST

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Procedures for Renovating My Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days   Leave a comment

 

 

Above:  Provisional Plans for the Renovated August Section of My Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days

Scans by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I have completed the process of taking notes for new posts about saints with feast days from July 21 to 31 and begun to write drafts in a composition book.  Next in line, mixed in with the drafting of lectionary-based devotions for the Season after Pentecost 2019, are plans for posts saints with feast days in August.

This seems like a good time to explain my procedures for the continuing renovation of my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.

First, one must be dead.  Unless one is a figure from the Hebrew Bible or the Gospels, one must also have died a Christian.

Second, formal canonization or other ecclesiastical recognition, although certainly helpful, is not mandatory.

Third, with few exceptions, I add new posts and replace old ones in chronological order of feast days, from January 1 to December 31.

Fourth, I begin the process of renovating a month by editing extant posts and changing the feast days of some saints.  When I complete this stage, I know where the vacancies to fill are, given my current policy of having  no more than four posts per feast day, and only one for certain feast days, such as the Feast of the Transfiguration (August 6).

Fifth, I pencil in names of people to consider adding.  I derive these names from ecclesiastical calendars (available in books and online), unofficial calendars of saints, and from names I have written down, having found them in various sources, including hymnals and news reports, lives of other saints, and my reading.

Sixth, sometimes I change my mind about adding someone to my Ecumenical Calendar.

Seventh, sometimes I modify my plans for a post by adding people to it.  I enjoy doing this.

Eighth, after I take notes, I draft posts.  Then I create and publish posts.

Ninth, assuming for the sake of discussion that I will live long enough and be able to complete the process of renovating my Ecumenical Calendar, thereby getting through new and replacement posts for December 31, I will repeat the cycle, stacking up to five posts for most days.   Then, when I return to January the next time, I will start stacking up to six posts for most days.  I can, time and other factors permitting, keep adding to my Ecumenical Calendar for a long time.

I pray that my hobby will enrich you spiritually, O reader.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 4, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF CHRISTOPHER HOMBURG, GERMAN LUTHERAN HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT FRANCIS CARACCIOLO, COFOUNDER OF THE MINOR CLERKS REGULAR

THE FEAST OF OLE T. (SANDEN) ARNESON, U.S. NORWEGIAN LUTHERAN HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT STANISLAW KOSTKA STAROWIEYSKI, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Posted June 4, 2018 by neatnik2009 in August, Communion of Saints, July 21-31

Virtues of the Saints   1 comment

Above:  Icon of All Saints

Image in the Public Domain

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Reading and writing about lives of saints are ennobling hobbies.  Certainly I find them preferable to a host of alternative possible ways to spend time, not all of which are inherently bad.  I might, for example, follow the news of perfidy, disregard for the truth, and probable criminality rife in the Executive Branch of the Government of the United States of America more closely.  Or I might pour over all the details of political attacks (under false pretenses) on a Roman Catholic chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives, complete with doses of Evangelical-Fundamentalist bias against Roman Catholicism, with its celibate priesthood in the Latin Rite.  Or I might lose myself in so-called reality shows.  But no, I prefer Bible studies and hagiographies.

I have been taking notes on saints with feast days ranging from July 7 to 11; I have not completed that project yet.  I have also made plans to draft posts, merge four feasts extant on my ECUMENICAL CALENDAR OF SAINTS’ DAYS AND HOLY DAYS into two feasts, and to create new posts during the next few days.

To focus on the lives of holy people, from antiquity to my lifetime, is to consider those who followed Christ left noble legacies.  There is never a bad time to do that, but now seems like an especially appropriate time, at least for me.  Nobody is perfect, but many of us are genuinely good.  I seek to, in the words of novelist Alex Haley,

Find the good and praise it.

As for current events, the passage of time and the efforts of principled investigators will reveal and document the truth, which will reside in the realm of objective reality, not opinion.  I leave that work to those suited for it.

Pax vobiscum!

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

THE SIXTH SUNDAY OF EASTER, YEAR B

THE FEAST OF SAINT ANNA ROSA GATTORNO, FOUNDRESS OF THE INSTITUTE OF THE DAUGHTERS OF SAINT ANNE, MOTHER OF MARY IMMACULATE

THE FEAST OF TOBIAS CLAUSNITZER, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINTS WILLIBALD OF EICHSTATT AND LULLUS OF MAINZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT WALBURGA OF HEIDENHELM, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBESS; SAINTS PETRONAX OF MONTE CASSINO, WINNEBALD OF HEIDENHELM, WIGBERT OF FRITZLAR, AND STURMIUS OF FULDA, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOTS; AND SAINT SEBALDUS OF VINCENZA, ROMAN CATHOLIC HERMIT AND MISSIONARY

THE FEAST OF CLARENCE DICKINSON, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN ORGANIST AND COMPOSER

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Theological Diversity and the Communion of Saints   Leave a comment

Above:  Icon of All Saints

Image in the Public Domain

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

IN PARTICULAR, WITH REGARD TO MY ECUMENICAL CALENDAR OF SAINTS’ DAYS AND HOLY DAYS

My methodology of adding to my Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days entails filling vacant slots on a day-by-day basis.  If I, for example, have two vacant slots for a given date, I ponder saints, consider how much information is available about them, and decide how best to fill both slots, if possible.  Sometimes I leave slots vacant, for filling later.  My current policy is to have a maximum of four posts (with one or more saints per post) per day, except a date with a Biblically-themed feast, when I usually reserve that date for that feast, unless I make a rare exception to that rule.  March 25, for example, is the Feast of the Annunciation and the Feast of St. Dismas, both Biblically themed feasts.  January 1 is the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus; it is also World Peace Day.  Nevertheless, January 6 is solely the Feast of the Epiphany on my Ecumenical Calendar.  I plan to change the maximum number of posts for most days to five in 2020 or 2021, and perhaps to more eventually.  My Ecumenical Calendar can be a long-term project always in progress, assuming that I lead a long life.

Longevity is not a guarantee, of course.  Yet I make plans, just in case I am around and able to continue work on this hobby.

Since I think about additions to my Ecumenical Calendar on a day-by-day basis, looking at the trees, not the forest, so to speak, I do not collect data about societal categories (such as gender, ethnicity, and national origin) and assign quotas based on them.  Affirmative action, for all its societal value in many settings and cultures at certain times, has no place in my Ecumenical Calendar.  I do, however, enjoy recognizing people whose stories of faith have fallen into the shadows of others, including other saints.  Many of these overlooked saints fall into categories such as women, racial or ethnic minorities, and members of powerless or less powerful populations.  I cite, for example, my recent post about Niebuhrs, which includes not just Reinhold and H. Richard, but Hulda and Ursula also.

I do think purposefully about theological diversity.  Thus Popes rub shoulders with Protestants and Orthodox Patriarchs, Anglican bishops with Puritan missionaries, dogmatic theologians with non-dogmatic theologians, and mystics and alleged heretics with the conventionally orthodox, by the standards of their contexts.  In the New Testament a saint is simply a Christian; that is my definition of a saint.  The great cloud of witnesses spreads out across a wide spectrum.

According to an old saying, each Christian is somebody’s schismatic.  One might make a strong case for Roman Catholicism being schismatic from Judaism.  As surely as each Christian is somebody’s schismatic, he or she is also somebody’s heretic.  God defines heresy with certitude; we mere mortals do not.  Often we define heresy to exclude those who disagree with us, but sometimes our definitions overlap with God’s.  But how are we to know how often that happens?

I steer a moderate course through the thicket of heresy and orthodoxy, learning from early Ecumenical Councils and Church Fathers, and from Desert Mothers and Desert Fathers.  While I do this I acknowledge that, according to the Roman Catholic Church, I, as one who belongs to another Christian communion (The Episcopal Church, to be precise), I lack the fullness of the faith.  Roman Catholic orthodoxy since Vatican II holds that, since Holy Mother Church alone has the fullness of the faith, all other Christians are “separated brethren.”  At least I am no longer going to Hell, allegedly.  Progress is progress.

For all the theological diversity represented on my Ecumenical Calendar, unity is also evident.  The unity of serving Christ is present; that outweighs many differences.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 27, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF GEORGE WASHINGTON DOANE, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF NEW JERSEY; AND HIS SON, WILLIAM CROSWELL DOANE, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF ALBANY; HYMN WRITERS

THE FEAST OF SAINTS ANTONY AND THEODOSIUS OF KIEV, FOUNDERS OF RUSSIAN ORTHODOX MONASTICISM; SAINT BARLAAM OF KIEV, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX ABBOT; AND SAINT STEPHEN OF KIEV, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX ABBOT AND BISHOP

THE FEAST OF CHRISTINA ROSSETTI, POET AND RELIGIOUS WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINTS REMACLUS OF MAASTRICHT, THEODORE OF MAASTRICHT, LAMBERT OF MAASTRICHT, HUBERT OF MAASTRICHT AND LIEGE, AND FLORBERT OF LIEGE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT LANDRADA OF MUNSTERBILSEN, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBESS; AND SAINTS OTGER OF UTRECHT, PLECHELM OF GUELDERLAND, AND WIRO, ROMAN CATHOLIC MISSIONARIES

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++