Archive for the ‘November 19’ Category

Feast of Arthur Henry Mann (November 19)   Leave a comment

Above:  Arthur Henry Mann

Image in the Public Domain

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ARTHUR HENRY MANN (MAY 16, 1850-NOVEMBER 19, 1929)

Anglican Organist and Hymn Tune Composer

Arthur Henry Mann comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Methodist Hymnal (1966).  This post relies primarily on various hymnal companion volumes.

Mann, born in Norwich, England, on May 16, 1850, became a superb musician.  He, a boy chorister and an organist at the Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Norwich, was a prodigy.  Our saint, when eight years old, could play the full cathedral service on the organ.  After Mann’s voice changed, he ceased to be a chorister.  He remained an organist, though.  The graduate of New College, Oxford (B.Mus., 1874; D.Mus., 1882) served as organist at the following:

  1. St. Peter’s Church, Wolverhampton (1870-1871);
  2. St. Michael and All Angels’ Church, Tettenhall, Wolverhampton (1871-1875);
  3. Beverley Minster, Beverley (1875-1876);
  4. King’s College, Cambridge (1876-1910); and
  5. Cambridge University (1897f).

Mann, a choir director, as well as the music master of Ley’s School, Cambridge University, applied his musical talents in other ways, too.  Our saint, from 1871 a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists, was the music editor of The Church of England Hymnal (1895).  Mann, a musicologist, collected early hymnals and was an expert on the music of George Frederick Handel (1685-1759).  Our saint put Handel’s manuscripts in order.  Mann also edited an edition of Spem in Alium, by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585).

Mann was also a composer.  He wrote music for voice and organ.  His most enduring compositions were probably hymn tunes, though.  These included the following:

  1. ANGEL’S STORY (frequently attached to “O Jesus, I Have Promised”),
  2. ARISTIDES,
  3. BENEDICTION,
  4. BERNO,
  5. CLAUDIUS,
  6. SILESIUS,
  7. THE NEW YEAR,
  8. VALOUR,
  9. WATERMOUTH, and
  10. WILTON.

Mann, aged 79 years, died in Cambridge, England, on November 19, 1929.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 26, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM COWPER, ANGLICAN HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT ADELARD OF CORBIE, FRANKISH ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK AND ABBOT; AND HIS PROTÉGÉ, SAINT PASCHASIUS RADBERTUS, FRANKISH ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK, ABBOT, AND THEOLOGIAN

THE FEAST OF ROBERT HUNT, FIRST ANGLICAN CHAPLAIN AT JAMESTOWN, VIRGINIA

THE FEAST OF RUTH BYLLESBY, EPISCOPAL DEACONESS IN GEORGIA

THE FEAST OF SAINT STANISLAW KUBISTA, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR, 1940; AND SAINT WLADYSLAW GORAL, POLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP AND MARTYR, 1945

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring Arthur Henry Mann and all those

who with music have inspired us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior, who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 728

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Feast of St. Elizabeth of Hungary (November 19)   4 comments

St. Elizabeth of Hungary

Above:  St. Elizabeth of Hungary

Image in the Public Domain

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SAINT ELIZABETH OF HUNGARY (JULY 7, 1207-NOVEMBER 17, 1231)

Princess of Hungary and Humanitarian

Also known as St. Elizabeth of Thuringia

St. Elizabeth of Hungary has three feast days.  Since Advent 1969 her feast has fallen on November 17 in the Roman Catholic Church.  The Book of Catholic Worship (1966), reflecting the calendar current that year, lists her feast day as November 19.    Common Worship (The Church of England, 2000) lists her feast day as November 18.  Her feast day in The Episcopal Church is November 19.  Evangelical Lutheran Worship (Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, 2006) and its predecessor, the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), list her feast day as November 17, however.

St. Elizabeth was royalty.  Her father was Andrew II, King of Hungary (reigned 1205-1235).  Her mother was Queen Gertrude of Merania (1185-1213), sister of St. Hedwig of Andechs/of Silesia (feast day = October 16), Duchess of Silesia (1201-1238) and of Greater Poland (1231-1238).  St. Hedwig, who became a lay sister (without monastic vows) after her husband died, was extravagant in her generosity to the poor, especially widows, orphans, the ill, and lepers.  She founded hospitals for them, in fact.  Her generosity found an echo in the good works of her famous niece.  St. Elizabeth, born at Pozsony, Hungary (now Bratislava, Slovakia), on July 7, 1207, grew up (from the age of four years) in the court of Thuringia (now Hesse, Germany), where she prepared for an arranged marriage to the future Louis/Ludwig IV, Landgrave of Thuringia (reigned 1217-1227).  They married in 1221; he was 20 years old; she was 14.  The couple had three children:

  1. Hermann II (1222-1241; never reigned as landgrave);
  2. Sophie of Thuringia (1224-1275); and
  3. Gertrude (1227-1297), also known as Blessed Gertrude of Aldenberg, Abbess of Aldenberg from 1248 to 1297.  Her feast day is August 13.

Louis/Ludwig, also known as Blessed Louis/Ludwig IV of Thuringia (feast day = September 11), died of fever in Italy in 1227, en route to join the Sixth Crusade (1228-1229).  He was 26 years old.  The Landgrave had approved of his wife’s extravagant generosity to the poor.  She gave state robes to the poor, fed them from the royal granaries, spun wool cloth for clothing for them, sold her jewels to finance a hospital for the poor, and visited the patients daily.  Certain relatives, however, objected strongly to such generosity.  In 1228 she and her children left the court of Thuringia and moved to Marburg.  She might have left involuntarily.  (Sources disagree on that point.)

St. Elizabeth, as a widow (1227-1231), had a difficult life.  She took monastic vows, including celibacy (which proved politically useful for her, preventing a loveless marriage) and obedience to her confessor, Konrad von Marburg (1180-1233), in the Third Order of Franciscans.  Konrad was a cruel man, unfortunately.  He, for example, ordered her beaten and commanded her to send her children away.  She did, however, regain her dowry, which she used to help the poor.  One of the ways she did this was to finance a hospital for the poor at Marburg.

St. Elizabeth died at Marburg on November 17, 1231.  She was 24 years old.  Pope Gregory IX canonized her in 1235.

May we find the most effective way to help those vulnerable people to whom God sends us and whom God sends to us.  Not all of us can afford to finance hospitals, for example, but we can do something, even if it is just to donate food to a local food bank.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 6, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE TRANSFIGURATION

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Almighty God, by your grace your servant Elizabeth of Hungary

recognized and honored Jesus in the poor of this world:

Grant that we, following her example, may with love and gladness serve those in any need or trouble,

in the name and for the sake of Jesus Christ; who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Tobit 12:6b-9

Psalm 109:20-25

2 Corinthians 8:7-15

Luke 6:35-38

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 689

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Feast of Alice Nevin (November 19)   1 comment

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Above:  Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 1921

Image Source = Library of Congress

Copyright Claimant = Darmstaetter’s, Lancaster, Pennsylvania

J247993 U.S. Copyright Office

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ALICE NEVIN (AUGUST 1, 1837-NOVEMBER 19, 1925)

U.S. German Reformed Liturgist and Composer of Hymn Tunes

Alice Nevin, one of six children and three daughters of Martha Jenkins and John Williamson Nevin (1803-1886), a great Mercersburg theologian in the former Reformed Church in the United States (1793-1934), was an heiress to her father’s legacy.  She carried it well, with an emphasis on hymns.

Our saint, born at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on August 1, 1837, when her father taught at Western Theological Seminary, spent most of her life in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.  Professor Nevin transferred to Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, in 1840 then to Lancaster 11 years later.  Alice walked with a limp, albeit not a debilitating one, because a nurse dropped her when she was a baby.  Our saint, who never married, served as an organist and choir director at both Franklin and Marshall College and First Reformed Church, Lancaster, for many years.  She also helped to found St. Luke’s Reformed Church, Lancaster, in 1879.

[Aside:  First Reformed Church has become First Reformed United Church Christ.  St. Luke’s Reformed Church became St. Luke’s United Church of Christ.  St. Luke’s, like many urban congregations, lost most of its membership to suburban churches.  It closed on May 31, 2015, and remaining members transferred to Trinity United Church of Christ.]

Nevin cared deeply about the quality of hymns and songs for children.  She edited Hymns and Carols for Church and Sunday School (1879), a volume more formalistic congregations of the Reformed Church in the United States used.  In the preface our saint criticized many hymns and songs for children for being childish when they should be childlike.  She also condemned many of them for featuring

meaningless, jingling rhymes and melodies.

–page 3

The hymnal included five of her hymn tunes and three of her arrangements.  Two of these tunes were nameless, but the other three were RESURRECTION, CECIL, and ELSIE.  The arrangements were WILLIAMSON, COBLENTZ, and CORNISH MELODY.  The Hymnal of the Reformed Church in the United States (1890), The Hymnal of the Reformed Church (1920, with the Reformed Church in America, which barely used it), and The Hymnal (1941, Evangelical and Reformed Church, immediate successor to the Reformed Church in the United States) contained RESURRECTION and WILLIAMSON.  The committees for The Hymnal of the United Church of Christ (1974) and The New Century Hymnal (1995) omitted all tunes and arrangements by our saint.

Nevin was also active in the civil life of Lancaster.  She helped to found the Visiting Nurses’ Association.  Furthermore, she was one of the organizers of the Cliosophic Society, a literary society, in 1879.  And, in 1895, she founded the Iris Club, an organization for women, which she led for six years.

In 1922, toward the end of her life, Nevin published Poems, a slim volume she distributed only among her friends.  She died at home on November 19, 1925, aged 88 years.

Her insistence upon quality in hymns and songs for children remains relevant.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 4, 2016 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ALFRED TENNYSON, ENGLISH POET

THE FEAST OF FREDERICK WILLIAM FOSTER, ENGLISH MORAVIAN BISHOP, LITURGIST, HYMN WRITER, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF JOHN BROWNLIE, SCOTTISH PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER, HYMN WRITER, AND TRANSLATOR OF HYMNS

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Alice Nevin)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Feast of Samuel John Stone (November 19)   2 comments

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Above:  Salisbury Cathedral, Between 1910 and 1920

Publisher and Copyright Claimant = Detroit Publishing Company

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-det-4a24715

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SAMUEL JOHN STONE (APRIL 25, 1839-NOVEMBER 19, 1900)

Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

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One may not recognize the name of Samuel John Stone (1839-1900), but one might know “The Church’s One Foundation,” his most famous hymn.  Yet one may be aware that there are three versions of that hymn:

  1. the 1866 original version;
  2. the 1868 abbreviated version; and
  3. the 1885 expanded version, which he wrote for use as a processional at Salisbury Cathedral.

A hymn writer does have the right to revise, abbreviate, and extend his own lyrics, does he not?

Stone, born at Whitmore, Staffordshire, England, was a son of a priest of the Church of England.  Our saint studied at the Charterhouse, London, and at Pembroke College, Oxford University.  From the latter he graduated with an A.B. in 1862 and an A.M. ten years later.  Stone took Anglican Holy Orders and served congregations from 1862 to his death in 1900.

His first position was Curate of Windsor (1862-1870).  While there Stone wrote and published Lyra Fidelium (1866), a collection of twelve hymns explaining articles of the Nicene Creed.  Among these texts was the original form of “The Church’s One Foundation,” with seven stanzas.  The impetus for the composition of Lyra Fidelium was the controversy regarding the theology and deposition of John Colenso (1814-1883), Anglican Bishop of Natal from 1853 to 1863.  The bishop’s preference for higher criticism of the Bible, even questioning the historicity of much of the Old Testament, upset many people.  Stone was among his critics.  Colenso’s higher criticism has not disturbed me, however, for I have engaged in higher criticism and continue to do so.  Nevertheless, Colenso was not entirely above reproach, given his Universalism and his defenses of polygamists.

Our saint succeeded his father as the Curate of St. Paul’s, Haggerston, London, in 1870.  He remained at the poorest Anglican church in London, building it up, for twenty years and serving as Vicar from 1874.  During Stone’s tenure he published the following volumes:

  1. The Knight of Intercession, and Other Poems (1872);
  2. Sonnets of the Sacred Year (1875);
  3. Order of the Consecutive Church Service for Children, with Original Hymns (1883); and
  4. Hymns (Original and Translated) (1886).

In 1890 Stone became the Rector of All-Hallows-on-the-Walls, London.  He remained there for about ten years, until he died.  Our saint, recognizing human needs on the doorstep of his parish, transformed its facilities into a haven for urban commuters who would have had to wander the sidewalks until their places of employment opened otherwise.  While at All Hallows Stone also published another book, Lays of Iona, and Other Poems (1897), and served on the committee which produced the 1909 version of Hymns, Ancient and Modern.

Stone died at the Charterhouse, London, on November 19, 1900.  Posthumous tributes included Poems and Hymns (1903) and a chapter in In Good Company (1917).

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

OCTOBER 6, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ALL CHRISTIAN BIBLE TRANSLATORS

THE FEAST OF SAINT BRUNO, FOUNDER OF THE CARTHUSIANS

THE FEAST OF HEINRICH ALBERT, GERMAN LUTHERAN COMPOSER AND POET

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM TYNDALE, BIBLE TRANSLATOR

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Heavenly Father, Shepherd of your people,

we thank you for your servant Samuel John Stone,

who was faithful in the care and nurture of your flock;

and we pray that, following his example and the teaching of his holy life,

we may by your grace grow into the stature of the

fullness of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16

Psalm 23

1 Peter 5:1-4

John 21:15-17

–Adapted from, Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 718

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Feast of Johann Christian Till and Jacob Christian Till (November 19)   1 comment

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Above:  Bell Tower, Central Moravian Church, Bethlehem, Pennyslvania, February 1969

Photographer = Jack E. Boucher

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = HABS PA,48-BETH,2–7

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JOHANN CHRISTIAN TILL (MAY 18, 1762-NOVEMBER 19, 1844)

U.S. Moravian Organist, Composer, and Piano Builder

father of

JACOB CHRISTIAN TILL (JULY 15, 1799-APRIL 9, 1882)

U.S. Moravian Piano Builder

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Before I write about the Tills I choose to note that I could have added at least two other people to this post.  Johann Christian Till’s life intersected with those of the Peter brothersSimon (1743-1819) and Johann Friedrich (1746-1813)–talented composers.  The simplest and best plan, I have concluded, is to write about them in a Simon brothers post, which I will link into this entry.  The focus here belongs on the Tills.

The Tills’ story began with the birth of Johann Christian Till at Gnadenthal, near Nazareth, Pennsylvania, on May 18, 1762.  He spent his entire life in the Nazareth-Bethlehem area, yet his musical influence spread as far as Herrnhut, in Saxony.  Till copied choral works for use in church and composed others for the same purpose.  One of his compositions was “Kindhearted and Gracious is the Lord.”  Moravian congregations worldwide performed his music.

Till attended Nazareth Hall, a boys’ school, where he studied under Simon Peter (1743-1819), pastor, composer, and church administrator.  Till supported himself as an adult primarily as a woodworker, with the notable exception of 1793-1808, when he worked as an organist and schoolmaster at Hope, New Jersey.  Then the school closed.  Music remained vital to his life, for he supplemented his income by working as an organist.  He also composed musical settings for Liturgical Hymns (1823).

From 1810 to 1834 Till and his son, Jacob Christian Till (1799-1882), derived most of their income from the family business of building pianos.  When this partnership started Jacob was eleven years old!  The father build the piano cabinet and the son constructed the mechanisms.  They were skilled craftsmen.  Unfortunately, only two of their pianos have survived to 2014.  Both are in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania–one at the Moravian Museum and the other at Moravian College.  Jacob moved to nearby Easton, Pennsylvania, in 1834.  Whether he continued building pianos is uncertain.

For much of the time that Till the elder was building pianos with his son he (the elder) supplemented his income by playing the organ at Central Moravian Church, Bethlehem.  He succeeded Johann Friedrich Peter (1746-1813) in that post in 1811.  Two of Till’s successors in that position were Theodore Francis Wolle (1832-1885) and John Frederick “J. Fred” Wolle (1863-1933), of whom I have written recently.

Johann Christian Till died on November 19, 1844.

Good music has an everlasting aspect to it.  As long as people can, for example, acquire and read musical scores then perform the music properly the composer’s legacy continues.  Unless the composition is a cappella an instrument is, by design, properly part of the performance.  That is where the builders of instruments fulfill their function.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

OCTOBER 5, 2014 COMMON ERA

PROPER 22:  THE SEVENTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, YEAR A

THE FEAST OF THE SAINTS AND MARTYRS OF ASIA

THE FEAST OF BRADFORD TORREY, U.S. ORNITHOLOGIST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF HARRY EMERSON FOSDICK, NORTHERN BAPTIST PASTOR AND OPPONENT OF FUNDAMENTALISM

THE FEAST OF THE INAUGURATION OF THE UNITED REFORMED CHURCH, 1972

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Lord Jesus Christ, master craftsman of our salvation,

we thank you for those artisans who have glorified you with their skills

and for those who continue to do so.

May we, inspired by their positive examples,

glorify you with all our skills, no matter how mundane we think they are.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 38:24-34

Psalm 86:1-13

Ephesians 4:25-5:2

Matthew 13:54-58

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 14, 2014 COMMON ERA

PROPER 19:  THE FOURTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, YEAR A

THE FEAST OF THE HOLY CROSS

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Feast of Johann Hermann Schein (November 19)   Leave a comment

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Above:  St. Thomas Church, Leipzig, Germany

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JOHANN HERMANN SCHEIN (JANUARY 20, 1586-NOVEMBER 19, 1630)

German Lutheran Composer

Johann Hermann Schein, born at Grunnhaim, Saxony, was the son of a Lutheran pastor.  Our saint studied music, theology, and philosophy.  He sang in the choir at the Elector of Saxony’s chapel for four years.  Then our saint took private tutoring for years.  Then, from 1613 to 1615, he served as Music Director for the court of Duke Johann Ernst of Saxe-Weimar.  Finally, in 1615, our saint became the Cantor of St. Thomas Church, Leipzig.  He, among the greatest composers of his age, wrote much beautiful music, including church chorales and motets.  And he edited a great and famous hymnal, Cantional (1627).

The public worship of God is a matter to take seriously and to do as well as one can.  Johann Hermann Schein understood this well and acted accordingly.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 25, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE INAUGURATION OF THE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST, 1957

THE FEAST OF JAMES WELDON JOHNSON, POET AND NOVELIST

THE FEAST OF SAINT WILLIAM OF VERCELLI, ROMAN CATHOLIC HERMIT; AND SAINT JOHN OF MATERA, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring Johann Hermann Schein

and all who with music have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior, who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 728

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Saints’ Days and Holy Days for November   1 comment

Topaz

Image Source = Didier Descouens

1 (ALL SAINTS)

2 (ALL SOULS/COMMEMORATION OF ALL FAITHFUL DEPARTED)

3 (Richard Hooker, Anglican Priest and Theologian)

  • Daniel Payne, African Methodist Episcopal Bishop
  • John Worthington, British Moravian Minister and Composer; John Antes, U.S. Moravian Instrument Maker, Composer, and Missionary; Benjamin Henry LaTrobe, Sr., British Moravian Bishop and Hymn Writer; Christian Ignatius LaTrobe, British Moravian Composer; Peter LaTrobe, British Moravian Bishop and Composer; Johann Christopher Pyrlaeus, Moravian Missionary and Musician; and Augustus Gottlieb Spangenberg, Moravian Bishop and Hymn Writer
  • Pierre-François Néron, French Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr in Vietnam, 1860

4 (Ludolph Ernst Schlicht, Moravian Minister, Musician, and Hymn Writer; John Gambold, Sr., British Moravian Bishop, Hymn Writer, and Translator of Hymns; and John Gambold, Jr., Moravian Composer)

  • Augustus Montague Toplady, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Léon Bloy, French Roman Catholic Novelist and Social Critic; his godson, Jacques Maritain, French Roman Catholic Philosopher; and his wife, Raïssa Maritain, French Roman Catholic Contemplative
  • Theodore Weld, U.S. Congregationalist then Quaker Abolitionist and Educator; his wife, Angelina Grimké, U.S. Presbyterian then Quaker Abolitionist, Educator, and Feminist; her sister, Sarah Grimké, U.S. Episcopalian then Quaker Abolitionist and Feminist; her nephew, Francis Grimké, African-American Presbyterian Minister and Civil Rights Activist; and his wife, Charlotte Grimké, African-American Abolitionist and Educator

5 (Bernard Lichtenberg, German Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1943)

  • Guido Maria Conforti, Founder of the Xavierian Missionaries
  • Hryhorii Lakota, Ukrainian Greek Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1950

6 (Christian Gregor, Father of Moravian Church Music)

  • Arthur Tappan and Lewis Tappan, U.S. Congregationalist Businessmen and Abolitionists; colleagues and financial backers of Samuel Eli Cornish and Theodore S. Wright, African-American Ministers and Abolitionists
  • Giovanni Gabrieli and Hans Leo Hassler, Composers and Organists; and Claudio Monteverdi and Heinrich Schutz, Composers and Musicians
  • Halford E. Luccock, U.S. Methodist Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • Magdeleine of Jesus, Founder of the Little Sisters of Jesus

7 (Willibrord, Apostle to the Frisians; and Boniface of Mainz, Apostle to the Germans)

  • Benedict Joseph Flaget, Roman Catholic Bishop of Bardstown then of Louisville, Kentucky
  • Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady of the United States, and Civil Rights Activist
  • Eugene Carson Blake, U.S. Presbyterian Minister, Ecumenist, and Moral Critic
  • John Cawood, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • John Christian Frederick Heyer, Lutheran Missionary in the United States and India; Bartholomeaus Ziegenbalg, Jr., Lutheran Minister to the Tamils; and Ludwig Nommensen, Lutheran Missionary to Sumatra and Apostle to the Batak

8 (John Duns Scotus, Scottish Roman Catholic Priest and Theologian)

  • Elizabeth of the Trinity, French Roman Catholic Nun, Mystic, and Religious Writer
  • Johann von Staupitz, Martin Luther’s Spiritual Mentor
  • John Caspar Mattes, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Liturgist
  • Pambo of Nitria, Ammonius of Skete, Palladius of Galatia, Macarius of Egypt, Macarius of Alexandria, and Pishoy, Desert Fathers; Evagrius of Pontus, Monk and Scholar; Melania the Elder, Desert Mother; Rufinus of Aquileia, Monk and Theologian; Didymus the Blind, Biblical Scholar; John II, Bishop of Jerusalem; Melania the Younger, Desert Mother; and her husband, Pinian, Monk

9 (Martin Chemnitz, German Lutheran Theologian, and the “Second Martin”)

  • Andreas Peter Berggreen, Danish Lutheran Musicologist, Organist, Music Educator, and Composer
  • Elijah P. Lovejoy, U.S. Journalist, Abolitionist, Presbyterian Minister, and Martyr, 1837; his brother, Owen Lovejoy, U.S. Abolitionist, Lawmaker, and Congregationalist Minister; and William Wells Brown, African-American Abolitionist, Novelist, Historian, and Physician
  • Johann(es) Matthaus Meyfart, German Lutheran Educator and Devotional Writer
  • Margery Kempe, English Roman Catholic Mystic and Pilgrim
  • William Croswell, Episcopal Priest and Hymn Writer

10 (Leo I “the Great,” Bishop of Rome)

  • Lott Cary, African-American Baptist Minister and Missionary to Liberia; and Melville B. Cox, U.S. Methodist Minister and Missionary to Liberia
  • Odette Prévost, French Roman Catholic Nun, and Martyr in Algeria, 1995

11 (Anne Steele, First Important English Female Hymn Writer)

  • Alijca Maria Jadwiga Kotowska, Polish Roman Catholic Nun and Martyr, 1939
  • Edwin Hatch, Anglican Priest, Scholar, and Hymn Writer
  • Martha Coffin Pelham Wright; her sister, Lucretia Coffin Mott; her husband, James Mott; his sister, Abigail Lydia Mott Moore; and her husband, Lindley Murray Moore; U.S. Quaker Abolitionists and Feminists
  • Peter Taylor Forsyth, Scottish Congregationalist Minister and Theologian

12 (Josaphat Kuntsevych, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Polotsk, and Martyr, 1623)

  • John Tavener, English Presbyterian then Orthodox Composer
  • Juana Inés de la Cruz, Mexican Roman Catholic Nun, Composer, Writer, Philosopher, Feminist, and Alleged Heretic
  • Ray Palmer, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • William Arthur Dunkerley, British Novelist, Poet, and Hymn Writer

13 (Henry Martyn Dexter, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Historian)

  • Abbo of Fleury, Roman Catholic Abbot
  • Brice of Tours, Roman Catholic Bishop
  • Frances Xavier Cabrini, Founder of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart
  • William Romanis, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

14 (Samuel Seabury, Episcopal Bishop of Connecticut, and Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church)

  • Maria Luiza Merkert, Co-Founder of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth
  • Nicholas Tavelic and His Companions, Roman Catholic Martyrs, 1391
  • Peter Wolle, U.S. Moravian Bishop, Organist, and Composer; Theodore Francis Wolle, U.S. Moravian Organist and Composer; and John Frederick “J. Fred” Wolle, U.S. Moravian Organist, Composer, and Choir Director

15 (John Amos Comenius, Father of Modern Education)

  • Gustaf Aulén and his protégé and colleague, Anders Nygren, Swedish Lutheran Bishops and Theologians
  • Jane Montgomery Campbell, Anglican Hymn Translator and Music Educator
  • Johann Gottlob Klemm, Instrument Maker; David Tannenberg, Sr., German-American Moravian Organ Builder; Johann Philip Bachmann, German-American Moravian Instrument Maker; Joseph Ferdinand Bulitschek, Bohemian-American Organ Builder; and Tobias Friedrich, German Moravian Composer and Musician
  • Johannes Kepler, German Lutheran Astronomer and Mathematician
  • Joseph Pignatelli, Restorer of the Jesuits

16 (Margaret of Scotland, Queen, Humanitarian, and Ecclesiastical Reformer)

  • Giuseppe Moscati, Italian Roman Catholic Physician
  • Ignacio Ellacuria and His Companions, Martyrs in El Salvador, November 15, 1989
  • Jesuit Martyrs of Paraguay, 1628

17 (Henriette DeLille, Founder of the Sisters of the Holy Family)

  • Hugh of Lincoln, Roman Catholic Bishop and Abbot

18 (Hilda of Whitby, Roman Catholic Abbess)

  • Arthur Tozer Russell, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Isabel Alice Hartley Crawford, Baptist Missionary to the Kiowa Nation
  • Jane Eliza(beth) Leeson, English Hymn Writer

19 (Elizabeth of Hungary, Princess of Hungary, and Humanitarian)

  • Alice Nevin, U.S. German Reformed Liturgist and Composer of Hymn Texts
  • Arthur Henry Mann, Anglican Organist, Choir Director, Hymnodist, and Hymn Tune Composer
  • Johann Christian Till, U.S. Moravian Organist, Composer, and Piano Builder; and his son, Jacob Christian Till, U.S. Moravian Piano Builder)
  • Johann Hermann Schein, German Lutheran Composer
  • Samuel John Stone, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer

20 (F. Bland Tucker, Episcopal Priest and Hymnodist; “The Dean of American Hymn Writers”)

  • Henry Francis Lyte, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Priscilla Lydia Sellon, a Restorer of Religious Life in The Church of England
  • Richard Watson Gilder, U.S. Poet, Journalist, and Social Reformer
  • Theodore Claudius Pease, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

21 (Thomas Tallis and his student and colleague, William Byrd, English Composers and Organists; and John Merbecke, English Composer, Organist, and Theologian)

  • Guy Ignatius Chabrat, Roman Catholic Bishop Coadjutor of Bardstown then of Louisville, Kentucky; and his cousin, Peter Joseph Lavialle, Roman Catholic Bishop of Louisville, Kentucky
  • Henry Purcell and his brother, Daniel Purcell, English Composers
  • Maria Franciszka Siedliska, Founder of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth

22 (Robert Seagrave, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer)

  • Anna Kolesárová, Slovak Roman Catholic Martyr, 1944
  • Ditlef Georgson Ristad, Norwegian-American Lutheran Minister, Hymn Translator, Liturgist, and Educator

23 (Clement I, Bishop of Rome)

  • Caspar Friedrich Nachtenhofer, German Lutheran Minister, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer
  • Columban, Roman Catholic Monk, Abbot, and Missionary
  • Enrichetta Alfieri, Italian Roman Catholic Nun and “Angel of San Vittore”
  • John Kenneth Pfohl, Sr., U.S. Moravian Bishop; his wife, Harriet Elizabeth “Bessie” Whittington Pfohl, U.S. Moravian Musician; and their son, James Christian Pfohl, Sr., U.S. Moravian Musician

24 (Andrew Dung-Lac and Peter Thi, Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs in Vietnam, 1839)

  • Lucy Menzies, Scottish Presbyterian then Anglican Scholar and Mystic
  • Theophane Venard, Roman Catholic Priest, Missionary, and Martyr in Vietnam, 1861
  • Vincent Liem, Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr in Vietnam, 1773

25 (William Hiley Bathurst, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer)

  • Isaac Watts, English Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • James Otis Sargent Huntington, Founder of the Order of the Holy Cross
  • John LaFarge, Jr., U.S. Roman Catholic Priest and Renewer of Society
  • Petrus Nigidius, German Lutheran Educator and Composer; and Georg Nigidius, German Lutheran Composer and Hymn Writer

26 (Siricius, Bishop of Rome)

  • H. Baxter Liebler, Episcopal Priest and Missionary to the Navajo Nation
  • John Berchmans, Roman Catholic Seminarian
  • Sojourner Truth, U.S. Abolitionist, Mystic, and Feminist
  • Theodore P. Ferris, Episcopal Priest and Author

27 (James Intercisus, Roman Catholic Martyr)

  • William Cooke and Benjamin Webb, Anglican Priests and Translators of Hymns

28 (Stephen the Younger, Defender of Icons)

  • Albert George Butzer, Sr., U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Educator
  • Kamehameha IV and Emma Rooke, King and Queen of Hawai’i
  • James Mills Thoburn, Isabella Thoburn, and Clara Swain, U.S. Methodist Missionaries to India
  • Joseph Hofer and Michael Hofer, U.S. Hutterite Conscientious Objectors and Martyrs, 1918

29 (Day of Intercession and Thanksgiving for the Missionary Work of the Church)

  • Frederick Cook Atkinson, Anglican Church Organist and Composer
  • Jennette Threlfall, English Hymn Writer

30 (ANDREW THE APOSTLE, MARTYR)

Floating

  • Thanksgiving Day

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.