Feast of Henry B. Whipple (February 18)   1 comment

Above:  A Former Flag of Minnesota

Image in the Public Domain

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HENRY BENJAMIN WHIPPLE (FEBRUARY 15, 1822-SEPTEMBER 16, 1901)

Episcopal Bishop of Minnesota

Bishop Henry B. Whipple comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Whipple was simultaneously a man of his time and ahead of it.  His paternalistic attitude toward Native Americans was indefensible.  However, our saint was a vocal critic of abuses indigenous people suffered at the hands of civilians and the federal government.  This made him politically unpopular and out of step with many of his fellow whites, especially in Minnesota.

Whipple was a priest and missionary prior to becoming a bishop.  He, born in Adams, New York, on February 15, 1822, was a child of John Hall Whipple (1795-1859) and Elizabeth Wager (1798-1870).  Our saint married Cornelia Wright (1816-1870) on October 5, 1842.  The couple had six children.  Whipple, raised a Presbyterian, became an Episcopal priest in 1848.  He served as the Rector of Zion Episcopal Church, Rome, New York, before transferring to the Episcopal Church of the Holy Communion, Chicago, Illinois, in 1857.  Then, in 1859, at the age of 37 years, Whipple became the first Bishop of Minnesota and the youngest member of the House of Bishops.

During his long episcopate (1859-1901), Whipple accomplished much.  He transformed the fledgling Diocese of Minnesota into a stable see.  Our saint also worked to improve the lives of indigenous people, who suffered from poverty and whom the federal government exploited.  Federal management of Indian Affairs was, in the bishop’s words,

a stupendous piece of wickedness.

Whipple, while presiding over missionary outreach to tribes, stuck his neck out to speak out on their behalf.  In August 1862, white-Native tensions erupted into the U.S.-Dakota War.  The United States Army, having tried and convicted 303 Dakota men, prepared to hang them.  Whipple argued publicly on the condemned men’s behalf and interceded on their behalf with President Abraham Lincoln.  The bishop cast blame onto the federal government for violating treaties and treating indigenous people badly.  He also questioned the legality of the trials and condemned the lack of a proper defense in court.  His appeal to Lincoln was mostly successful; 38 Dakota men hanged and 265 received pardons.

Whipple, simultaneously praised and condemned for his relatively liberal attitude toward Natives, served on various commissions and boards.  These included the Sioux Commission (1876), the Northwest Indian Commission (1887), and the U.S. Board of Indian Commissioners (1895-1901).

Whipple, a widower, remarried on October 22, 1896.  His second wife was Evangeline Marrs (d. 1830).

Whipple, aged 79 years, died in Faribault, Minnesota, his home since 1860, on September 16, 1901.  “Straight Tongue,” as Natives had called him because of his honesty and outspokenness, fell into the silence of death.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 22, 2019 COMMON ERA

PROPER 20:  THE FIFTEENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST, YEAR C

THE FEAST OF PHILANDER CHASE, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF OHIO, AND OF ILLINOIS; AND PRESIDING BISHOP

THE FEAST OF C. H. DODD, WELSH CONGREGATIONALIST MINISTER, THEOLOGIAN, AND BIBLICAL SCHOLAR

THE FEAST OF CHARLOTTE WEBB, JULIA ANNE ELLIOTT, AND EMILY ELLIOTT, ANGLICAN HYMN WRITERS

THE FEAST OF JUSTUS FAULKNER, LUTHERAN PASTOR AND HYMN WRITER

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Heavenly Father, Shepherd of your people, we thank you for your servant Henry B. Whipple,

who was faithful in the care and nurture of your flock:

and we pray that, following his example and the teaching of his holy life,

we may by your grace grow into the stature of fullness of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Ezekiel 34:11-16

Psalm 23

1 Peter 5:1-4

John 21:15-17

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 718

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Feast of John Meyendorff (February 17)   Leave a comment

Above:  Logo of The Orthodox Church in America

Fair Use

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IVAN FEOFILOVICH, BARON VON MEYENDORFF (FEBRUARY 17, 1926-JULY 22, 1992)

Russian-French-American Orthodox Priest, Scholar, and Ecumenist

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In America, both of their numbers and the quality of many among its clergy and laity, the Greek Orthodox community deserves a position of leadership….The mission of all Americans regardless of ethnic background (as required by the Gospel itself) cannot wait for changes occurring in Istanbul, Turkey.

–John Meyendorff; quoted in G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006), 66

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A theme common to Old World immigrant Christian denominations in the United States of America is metaphorically redrawing the map of the Old World in the new country.  Therefore, one can read of long-lasting ethnic divisions that continue (or have continued) to define otherwise similar denominations after language has ceased to function as a barrier.  Cultural attachments, comforting to many, impede the Great Commission, though.

John Meyendorff understood this.

Ivan Feofilovich, Baron von Meyendorff came from a Russian family living in France.  He, born in Neuilly-sur-Seine, on February 17, 1926, remained in France until 1959.  He studied at the Sorbonne in the late 1940s and at the École Pratique des Hautes Études from 1948 to 1954.  Our saint earned his doctorate in Letters in Theology from the Sorbonne in 1958.  His dissertation became his first book, A Study of Gregory Palamas (French, 1959; English, 1964).  Meyendorff also taught at St. Sergius Orthodox Theological Seminary, Paris, and became a Fellow of the Centre National de la Rechereche Scientifique.

Meyendorff, ordained to the priesthood, moved with his family to the United States in 1959.  His primary academic home from 1959 to 1992 was St. Vladimir’s Theological Seminary, Yonkers, New York.  Our saint was the Librarian, a professor, the Director of Studies, and the Dean (from March 19784 to June 1992), as well as the Editor of St. Vladimir’s Theological Quarterly.  Furthermore, Meyendorff held joint academic appointments to Harvard University, Fordham University, Union Theological Seminary (New York City), and Dumbarton Oaks.

Meyendorff’s books included the following:

  1. The Orthodox Church (1963),
  2. Orthodoxy and Catholicity (1966),
  3. Christ in Eastern Orthodox Thought (1969),
  4. Byzantine Theology (1973),
  5. Marriage, an Orthodox Perspective (1975),
  6. Living Tradition (1978),
  7. Byzantium and the Rise of Russia (1980),
  8. The Byzantine Legacy in the Orthodox Church (1981),
  9. Catholicity and the Church (1983), and
  10. Imperial Unity and Christian Divisions:  The Church, 450-680 A.D. (1989).

Meyendorff was an Eastern Orthodox ecumenist.  He represented his tradition in the World Council of Churches.  Our saint also encouraged Eastern Orthodox jurisdictions within the United States to merge across ethnic lines.  The Russian Orthodox groups that broke with the Moscow Patriarchate after 1917 did not heed our saint’s advice to lay aside their differences, but Meyendorff did play a role in the Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church in America becoming independent of the Moscow Patriarchate in 1970 and becoming The Orthodox Church in America (OCA).  The OCA has expanded beyond its Russian roots to include Albanian, Bulgarian, and Romanian dioceses.

Meyendorff, Rector of Christ the Savior Orthodox Church, New York, New York, from 1977 to 1984, was also active on the denominational level.  He advised the OCA’s Holy Synod and edited The Orthodox Church, a monthly newspaper.

Meyendorff, recipient of the Order of St. Vladimir, Second Class, from Patriarch Alexei II in 1991, retired from St. Vladimir’s Theological Seminary in June 1992.  His retirement was brief; pancreatic cancer claimed our saint’s life on July 22, 1992.  He was 66 years old.

The cause of transethnic unity of Eastern Orthodoxy in the United States remains unfinished work.

I compiled a list of the twenty-eight Eastern Orthodox congregations and chapels, as well as the one monastery, in Georgia, where I live.  I counted eight jurisdictions, with the following counts:

  1. Greek Orthodox–10,
  2. Orthodox Church in America–8,
  3. Antiochian Orthodox Christian–4,
  4. Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia–3,
  5. American Carpatho-Russian Orthodox–1,
  6. Serbian Orthodox–1,
  7. Romanian Orthodox–1, and.
  8. Ukrainian Orthodox–1

Not surprisingly, most of these are in the Atlanta metropolitan area, where the majority of Georgians reside.

Denominational inertia persists.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 21, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT MATTHEW THE EVANGELIST, APOSTLE AND MARTYR

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Almighty God, we praise your name for your servant John Meyendorff,

through whom you have called the church to its tasks and renewed its life.

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your church and proclaim the reality of your reign,

through whom Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 60

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Feast of Blessed Antoni Leszczewicz and His Companions (February 17)   Leave a comment

Above:  Blessed Antoni Leszczewicz

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED ANTONI LESZCZEWICZ (SEPTEMBER 30, 1890-FEBRUARY 17, 1943)

Polish Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1943

Alternative feast day (as one of the 108 Martyrs of World War II) = June 12

Blessed Antoni Leszczewicz died because he followed Jesus.  Our saint, born in Abramovsk, Russian Empire (now Lithuania), on September 30, 1890, studied for the Roman Catholic priesthood in St. Petersburg, the imperial capital, from 1909 to 1914.  He graduated and became a priest in 1914.  As convulsions dismantled the old global order, Leszczewicz served as a missionary in the Far East for nearly a quarter of a century.  He served in Irkutsk and Chita until 1917, when he transferred to Manchuria.  Our saint, from 1924 a pastor in Harbin, China, oversaw the construction of a church, an orphanage, and a school.

Leszczewicz spent 1938-1943 in Europe.  In 1938, he joined the Congregation of the Marians of the Immaculate Conception.  In August 1939, our saint became a missionary to Druya (now in Belarus), in the Soviet Union.  Later, he transferred to an area of Belorussia long devoid of Roman Catholic priests.  Leszczewicz was not alone; he worked with some Sisters of the Eucharist and Father Jerzy Kaszira in Rositsa.

Leszczewicz and company suffered during the German occupation, starting in 1941.  Nazis, in reaction against Soviet partisan activities, targeted civilians for harsh treatment.  On February 17, 1943, soldiers led our saint, coworkers, and members of the congregation into the church building.  There Leszczewicz heard confessions, baptized those who requested it, and said one final Mass before the soldiers set the building on fire.

Pope John Paul II declared Leszczewicz a Venerable and beatified him in 1999.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 20, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF HENRI NOUWEN, DUTCH ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND SPIRITUAL WRITER

THE FEAST OF JOHN COLERIDGE PATTESON, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF MELANESIA, AND HIS COMPANIONS, MARTYRS, 1871

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARIE THERESE OF SAINT JOSEPH, FOUNDRESS OF THE CONGREGATION OF THE CARMELITE SISTERS OF THE DIVINE HEART OF JESUS

THE FEAST OF NELSON WESLEY TROUT, AFRICAN-AMERICAN LUTHERAN BISHOP

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Almighty and everlasting God, who kindled the flame of your love

in the heart of your holy martyr, Blessed Antoni Leszczewicz:

Grant to us, your humble servants, a like faith and power of love,

that we who rejoice in his triumph may profit by his example;

through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with

you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 15:15-21

Psalm 124 or 31:1-5

1 Peter 4:12-19

Mark 8:34-38

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 715

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Feast of Charles Todd Quintard (February 16)   4 comments

Above:  Charles Todd Quintard

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-cwpbh-01430

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CHARLES TODD QUINTARD (DECEMBER 22, 1824-FEBRUARY 16, 1898)

Episcopal Bishop of Tennessee

Bishop Charles Todd Quintard comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Episcopal Church.  Quintard is one of many saints listed in the side calendar (Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints, 2010; and A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  A Calendar of Commemorations, 2016), but not the main calendar (Lesser Feasts and Fasts, most recently revised in 2018, and in 2006, immediately prior to that).  Likewise, many saints listed in Lesser Feasts and Fasts are not in the side calendar.  Episcopal hagiography is not a simple matter.

Charles Todd Quintard, son of Dr. Isaac Quintard, M.D., was a physician prior to entering ordained ministry.  He, born in Stamfort, Connecticut, on December 22, 1824, descended from Huguenots.  Quintard studied at University Medical Center, New York University, and Bellevue Hospital prior to becoming an M.D. in 1847.  Our saint, a physician in Athens, Georgia, and a parishioner at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, from 1848 to 1851, moved to Memphis, Tennessee, to each at Memphis Medical College.  Our saint, with the support of James Hervey Otey, the Bishop of Tennessee, began to study for Holy Orders in 1854.  Otey ordained Quintard in 1856.

Quintard was a priest for about nine years before joining the ranks of bishops.  He was briefly the Rector of Calvary Episcopal Church, Memphis (1856-1857), then the Rector of the Episcopal Church of the Advent, Nashville (1857f).  Our saint, a High Churchman, served as a surgeon and a chaplain in the Confederate Army.  He compiled the Confederate Soldiers’ Pocket Manual of Devotions (1863) and Balm for the Weary and the Wounded (1864).

Quintard became the Bishop of Tennessee, succeeding the deceased James Hervey Otey, serving from October 1865 to February 1898.  He built up the Diocese of Tennessee and The University of the South, founding its School of Theology, as well.  The Diocese of Tennessee, Quintard insisted, had to be open to all who came, so he opposed any barriers.  Our saint, therefore, opposed pew rentals.  Although race-based chattel slavery had been the cornerstone of the Confederacy, as Vice President Alexander Hamilton Stephens had said openly in Savannah, Georgia, in March 1861, the bishop, a former Confederate Army chaplain, opposed racially-segregated congregations.  He also established programs to help poor people.  Furthermore, Quintard helped to found Hoffman Hall, Fisk University, Nashville, as a seminary for African Americans.

Quintard was in Meridian, Georgia, in McIntosh County and near Darien, for health reasons, when he died on February 16, 1898.  He was 73 years old.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 19, 2918 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT THEODORE OF TARSUS, ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY

THE FEAST OF SAINT EMILY DE RODAT, FOUNDRESS OF THE CONGREGATION OF THE HOLY FAMILY OF VILLEFRANCHE

THE FEAST OF WALTER CHALMERS SMITH, SCOTTISH PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF WALTER DALRYMPLE MACLAGAN, ARCHBISHOP OF YORK AND HYMN WRITER

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Mighty God, we bless your Name for the example of your bishop Charles Todd Quintard,

who opposed the segregation of African Americans in separate congregations and condemned the exclusion of the poor;

and we pray that your Church may be a refuge for all, for the honor of your Name;

through Jesus Christ, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) 34:14-19

Psalm 94:2-15

Romans 14:10-13

Luke 14:15-24

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 227

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Feast of Henry Williams Baker (February 12)   1 comment

Above:  Henry Williams Baker

Image in the Public Domain

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HENRY WILLIAMS BAKER (MAY 27, 1821-FEBRUARY 11, 1877)

Anglican Priest, Hymnal Editor, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator

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Praise, O praise our God and King;

Hymns of adoration sing;

For His mercies still endure,

Ever faithful, ever sure.

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Praise Him that He made the sun

Day by day his course to run; —

For His mercies still endure,

Ever faithful, ever sure; —

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And the silver moon, by night

Shining with her gentle light;

For His mercies still endure,

Ever faithful, ever sure.

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Praise Him that He gave the rain

To mature the swelling grain; —

For His mercies still endure,

Ever faithful, ever sure; —

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And hath bid the fruitful field

Crops of precious increase yield;

For His mercies still endure,

Ever faithful, ever sure.

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Praise Him for our harvest-store;

He hath filled the garner floor; —

For His mercies still endure,

Ever faithful, ever sure; —

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And for richer food than this,

Pledge of everlasting bliss;

For His mercies still endure,

Ever faithful, ever sure.

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Glory to our bounteous King!

Glory let creation sing,

Glory to the Father, Son,

And blest Spirit, Three in One!

–Henry Williams Baker, 1861

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Henry Baker Williams left a fine legacy of hymnody.

Our saint, born in London, England, on May 27, 1821, spent most of his adult life as a priest.  His father was Admiral Henry Loraine Baker, Baronet.  Our saint, educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, then ordained to the priesthood of The Church of England in 1844, served faithfully as the Vicar of Monkland from 1844 to 1877.  He, a High Churchman, practiced priestly celibacy.  Baker also wrote Family Prayers for the Use of Those Who Work Hard.

Baker composed hymn tunes, wrote hymn texts, and translated other hymn texts.  He composed the tunes “Quebec” and “Stephanos.”  Baker, the Editor-in-Chief of Hymns, Ancient and Modern (1861), translated “Of the Father’s Love Begotten” and wrote wonderful hymns such as “The King of Love My Shepherd Is.”

Baker, Baronet since 1851, died in Monkland on February 11, 1877.  He was 55 years old.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 18, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF DAG HAMMARSKJÖLD, SECRETARY-GENERAL OF THE UNITED NATIONS

THE FEAST OF EDWARD BOUVERIE PUSEY, ANGLICAN PRIEST

THE FEAST OF HENRY LASCALLES JENNER, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND

THE FEAST OF JOHN CAMPBELL SHAIRP, SCOTTISH POET AND EDUCATOR

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Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Henry Williams Baker and others, who have composed and translated hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

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Feast of Julia Williams Garnet, Henry Highland Garnet, Sarah J. Smith Tompkins Garnet, Susan Maria Smith McKinney Steward, and Theophilus Gould Steward (February 10)   Leave a comment

Above:  A Partial Family Tree

Scan by Kenneth Randolph Taylor

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JULIA WILLIAMS GARNET (JULY 1, 1811-JANUARY 7, 1870)

African-American Abolitionist and Educator

first wife of

HENRY HIGHLAND GARNET (DECEMBER 23, 1815-FEBRUARY 13, 1882)

African-American Presbyterian Minister and Abolitionist

second husband of

SARAH J. SMITH TOMPKINS GARNET (JULY 31, 1831-SEPTEMBER 17, 1911)

African-American Suffragette and Educator

sister of

SUSAN MARIA SMITH MCKINNEY STEWARD (MARCH 1847-MARCH 17, 1918)

African-American Physician

second wife of

THEOPHILUS GOULD STEWARD (APRIL 17, 1843-JANUARY 11, 1924)

U.S. African Methodist Episcopal Minister, U.S. Army Chaplain, and Professor

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The nation has begun its exodus from worse than Egyptian bondage; and I beseech you that say to the people, “that they go forward.”  With the assurance of God’s favor in all things done in obedience to his righteous will, and guided by day and night by the pillars of cloud and fire, let us not pause until we have reached the other and safe side of the stormy and crimson sea.  Let freemen and patriots mete out complete and equal justice to all men, and thus prove to mankind the superiority of our Democratic, Republican government.

–Henry Highland Garnet, addressing the United States House of Representatives, February 12, 1865; quoted in G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006), 604

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This post began with one name, that of Henry Highland Garnet, which I found in A Year with American Saints (2006).  As I took notes, however, I added two wives, a sister-in-law, and her second husband to the post.  I have, after all, established emphasizing relationships and influences as a goal of this project, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.

Julia Williams came from a free African-American family.  She, born in Charleston, South Carolina, on July 1, 1811, moved with her family to Boston, Massachusetts, when she was a child.  At the age of 21 years, Williams began to study at Prudence Crandall‘s Female Boarding School (for African Americans), which opened in 1831.  After hostility in Canterbury, New Hampshire, forced the school to close, Williams continued her studies at Noyes Academy, Canaan, New Hampshire (extant 1835).  There she met Henry Highland Garnet.

Henry Highland Garnet, born a slave, became an abolitionist.  He, born in New Market, Maryland, on December 23, 1815, fled with his family in 1824, first to Delaware, then to Pennsylvania.  The family had to keep moving, to evade slave-catchers.  Eventually, Garnet wound up in New York City, where, from 1826 to 1833, he studied at the African Free School then at Phoenix High School for Colored Youth.  Our saint helped to found the abolitionist Garrison Literary and Benevolent Association in 1835.  He and Julia Williams were students at Noyes Academy, Canaan, New Hampshire, in 1835.  Local racists forced the school to close then destroyed the building.  Next, they founded a whites-only school.

Williams and Garnet studied at the Oneida Institute (1827-1843), Whitesboro, New York.  Garnet, who graduated in 1839, became a teacher in Troy, New York.  He also began to study theology.  Williams, having joined the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society in the 1830s, was a delegate to the Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, New York City, in 1837.  Garnet suffered a severe sports-related injury in 1840; he lost one leg, amputated at the hip.  He and Williams married in 1841.  The couple had three children.  Only one child, a daughter, survived to adulthood.

Garnet, the first African-American graduate of Princeton Theological Seminary, became a Presbyterian minister.  He served at Liberty Street Presbyterian Church, Troy, New York, from 1842 to 1848.  He had already become simultaneously revolutionary and conservative, by abolitionist standards.  Our saint had, in 1840, helped to found the American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (AFASS), which broke away from the American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS).  The AASS, with William Lloyd Garrison as a prominent member, opened leadership positions to women and made the connection between the rights of slaves and the rights of women.  The AFASS, however, focused narrowly on slavery and reserved all leadership positions for men.  Yet Garnet, an abolitionist journalist since 1842, proved too radical for William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass in one way in 1843.  That year, addressing the National Negro Convention, Buffalon, New York, Garnet called for a slave insurrection:

Brethren, arise, arise!  Strike for your lives and liberties.  Now is the day and the hour.  Let every slave throughout the land do this, and the days of slavery are numbered.  You cannot be more oppressed than you have been–you cannot suffer greater cruelties than you have already.  Rather die freemen than live to be slaves.

Garrison and Douglass persuaded Garnet to to moderate his position.

Garnet’s activism continued.  By 1849, he openly supported African-American immigration to Mexico, Liberia, or the West Indies.  This position led him to found the African Civilization Society in 1858.  He, associated with the free produce movement, which favored an economic boycott of slavery, traveled and lectured in the British Isles in 1850-1852.  The Garnets were missionaries of The Church of Scotland to Jamaica in 1852-1855; Julia led a female industrial school there.  Henry’s health required him to leave Jamaica after three years.  The couple returned to the United States.  Henry worked with Frederick Douglass to recruit African-American soldiers during the Civil War.  Garnet, pastor of Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church, Washington, D.C., from 1864 to 1866, addressed the U.S. House of Representatives on February 12, 1865, after it passed the Thirteenth Amendment to the federal Constitution.  He became the President of Avery College, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (extant 1849-1873), in 1868.  Garnet also served as pastor of Shiloh Presbyterian Church, New York City, and favored Cuban independence from Spain.

Julia, who worked with former slaves in Washington, D.C., after the Civil War, died on January 7, 1870.  She was 58 years old.

Henry remarried, to Sarah J. Smith Tompkins, in 1879.

Sarah J. Smith and her sister, Susan Maria Smith, made history.  Their parents were prosperous farmers, Sylvanus Smith and Ann Eliza Springsteel, of Brooklyn, New York.  Sarah debuted on July 31, 1831.  Susan followed in March 1847.  Sarah’s first husband was Samuel Tompkins, who died in 1852.  The couple had two children, who died young.

Sarah J. Smith Tompkins became an educator.  She taught at the African Free School before becoming the first female, African-American principal in New York City; she led Grammar School Number 4, starting on April 30, 1863.

Susan, a musician and a music educator in the District of Columbia, pursued a career in medicine after one of her brothers died of cholera during an outbreak in Brooklyn.  She studied at the New York Medical College for Women in 1867-1869, and graduated as the valedictorian.  She became the first African-American female physician in the State of New York and the third in the United States.  Our saint practiced medicine in Brooklyn from 1870 to 1895, cofounded the Brooklyn Women’s Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary, and practiced medicine at the Brooklyn Home for Aged Colored People.  In 1871, Susan married the Reverend William G. McKinney (d. 1894), a Methodist minister.

Sarah, owner of a seamstress shop in Brooklyn from 1883 to 1911, was also a suffragette.  She founded the Equal Suffrage League in Brooklyn in the late 1880s.  Starting in 1896, she served as the Superintendent of the National Association of Colored Women.

Henry Highland Garnet, briefly the U.S. Minister to Liberia, received his appointment in late 1881.  He, aged 58 years, died in Monrovia, on February 13, 1882.

Theophilus Gould Steward was a minister, an academic, and an activist.  He, from free African-American stock, was a child of James Steward and Rebecca Gould.  Our saint, born in Gouldtown, New Jersey, on April 17, 1843, became a minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1863.  He planted churches in Georgia and South Carolina after the Civil War.  Our saint, from 1868 a pastor in Macon, Georgia, presided over the construction of a new edifice after the suspicious burning of the first one.  He, a graduate of the Episcopal Divinity School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was active in Haiti, and the eastern United States from 1872 to 1891.  Our saint, recipient of a Doctor of Divinity degree from Wilberforce University, Wilberforce, Ohio, in 1881, joined the United States Army as a chaplain in 1891.  He served in the 25th U.S. Colored Cavalry until 1907.  Steward spent time in the U.S. West, in Cuba during the Spanish-American War, and in the Philippines after that war.  His first wife, Elizabeth Gladden, died ini 1893.  The couple had eight children, from 1872 to 1883.

Susan Maria Smith McKinney married Theophilus Gould Steward in 1896.  They went to work at Wilberforce University in 1907.  Theophilus was a professor of French, history, and logic.  Susan was a physician.  In 1911, she and her sister, Sarah, attended the Universal Race Congress, New York City.  Susan presented a paper, “Colored American Women.”

Sarah J. Smith Tompkins Garnet, aged 80 years, died on September 17, 1911.

Susan Maria Smith McKinney Steward, aged 71 years, died on March 17, 1918.

Theophilus Gould Steward, a cofounder (with Alexander Crummell) of the American Negro Academy (1897-1928), died on January 11, 1924.  He was 80 years old.

The United States of America is better than it would have been otherwise because these five saints made their contributions to society.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF BLESSED JUTTA OF DISIBODENBERG, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBESS; AND HER STUDENT, SAINT HILDEGARD OF BINGEN, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBESS AND COMPOSER

THE FEAST OF GERARD MOULTRIE, ANGLICAN PRIEST, HYMN WRITER, AND TRANSLATOR OF HYMNS

THE FEAST OF SAINT ZYGMUNT SZCESNY FELINSKI, ROMAN CATHOLIC ARCHBISHOP OF WARSAW, TITULAR BISHOP OF TARSUS, AND FOUNDER OF RECOVERY OF THE POOR AND THE CONGREGATION OF THE FRANCISCAN SISTERS OF THE FAMILY OF MARY

THE FEAST OF SAINT ZYGMUNT SAJNA, ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR, 1940

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Almighty God, whose prophets taught us righteousness and care of your poor:

By the guidance of your Holy Spirit, grant that we may

do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly in your sight;

through Jesus Christ, our Judge and Redeemer, who lives and reigns

with you and the same Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.

Isaiah 55:11-56:1

Psalm 2:1-2, 10-12

Acts 14:14-17, 21-23

Mark 4:21-29

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 736

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Feast of Danny Thomas (February 9)   1 comment

Above:  Danny Thomas

Image in the Public Domain

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AMOS MUZYAD YAQOOB KAIROUZ (JANUARY 6, 1912-FEBRUARY 6, 1991)

U.S. Roman Catholic Entertainer and Humanitarian

Founder of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Also known as Amos Jacobs

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No child should die in the dawn of life.

–Danny Thomas

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Danny Thomas brought joy to many people and saved the lives of a host of children.

Amos Muzyad Yaqoob Kairouz, born in Deerfield, Michigan, on January 6, 1912, was a Maronite Catholic.  His parents, Margaret Taouk and Charles Yaqoob Kairouz, were Lebanese immigrants.  Raised in Toledo, Ohio, our saint graduated from the University of Toledo.  On January 15, 1936, when our saint was 24 years, he married Rose Marie Cassaniti (d. July 12, 2000).

Our saint anglicized his name and became Amos Jacobs then Danny Thomas.  He began performing on radio in Detroit in 1932 then settled in Detroit in 1940.  He worked on radio in various programs, including The Danny Thomas Show (1942-1943 and 1947-1948).  Thomas made the transition to film in the late 1940s.  He starred opposite Doris Day in I’ll See You in My Dreams (1951) and opposite Peggy Lee in The Jazz Singer (1952).  In the early 1950s, Thomas found success in television.  He starred in Make Room for Daddy, a.k.a. The Danny Thomas Show (1953-1965).  He starred in subsequent series and appeared in various televisions specials, also.  Furthermore, Thomas as an actor and a producer, helped other actors get their big breaks.  These thespians included Mary Tyler Moore, Bill Bixby, and Angela Cartwright.  Series Thomas produced included The Andy Griffith Show, The Dick Van Dyke Show, and The Mod Squad.

Thomas was a family man.  He and Rose Marie had three children:

  1. Margaret Julia “Marlo” (1937-), an actress;
  2. Theresa “Terre” (1942-), an actress and singer; and
  3. Charles Anthony “Tony” (1948-), a producer.

When Thomas was a young man with a daughter (Marlo) on the way, our saint prayed to St. Jude, patron of hopeless and lost causes,

Show me my way in life and I will build you a shrine.

After becoming successful, Thomas began to raise funds for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, in the early 1950s.  The hospital opened in 1962.

Thomas began a great work, for which he became a Knight Commander of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre and received the Congressional Gold Medal.  The hospital has never changed any of the patients or patients’ families.

Our saint died of heart failure on February 6, 1991.  He was 79 years old.

The hospital he founded continues as a site at which dedicated medical professionals save lives.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 16, 2019 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CYPRIAN OF CARTHAGE, BISHOP AND MARTYR, 258; AND SAINTS CORNELIUS, LUCIUS I, AND STEPHEN I, BISHOPS OF ROME

THE FEAST OF GEORGE HENRY TRABERT, U.S. LUTHERAN MINISTER, MISSIONARY, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR AND AUTHOR

THE FEAST OF JAMES FRANCES CARNEY, U.S.-HONDURAN ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST, MISSIONARY, REVOLUTIONARY, AND MARTYR, 1983

THE FEAST OF MARTIN BEHM, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served, and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us, give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 60

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