Archive for the ‘September 11’ Category

Feast of Anne Houlditch Shepherd (September 11)   Leave a comment

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Above:  The Promenade, Isle of Wight, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-08976

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ANNE HOULDITCH SHEPHERD (SEPTEMBER 11, 1809-JANUARY 7, 1857)

Anglican Novelist and Hymn Writer

Anne Houlditch Shepherd, author of sixty-four hymns, was born at Cowes, Isle of Wight.  She, daughter of the Reverend Edward H. Houlditch, an Anglican rector, married S. Saville Shepherd in 1843.  Before our saint married she published (in 1836) the first edition of Hymns Adapted to the Comprehension of Young Minds (third edition in 1847; fifth edition in 1855).  She also wrote two religious novels, Ellen Seymour (1848) and Reality (1852).

Among our saint’s hymns was “Around the Throne of God in Heaven,” originally six stanzas long.  There is, according to research I have conducted, a tradition (going back to at least the 1850s) of altering the original text, especially the refrain as well as the third line of the penultimate stanza.  The altered refrain is:

Singing, “Glory, glory, glory be to God on high.”

And the altered third line of the penultimate stanza is:

Bathed in that pure and precious flood.”

The original, full text, as printed in Lyra Britannica (1867), in which it appears with other hymns by our saint, follows:

Around the throne of God in heaven,

Thousands of children stand,

Children whose sins are all forgiven,

A holy, happy band,

Singing glory, glory, glory.

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In flowing robes of spotless white

See every one arrayed;

Dwelling in everlasting light

And joys never fade,

Singing glory, glory, glory.

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Once they were little things like you,

And lived on earth below,

And could not praise as how they do

The Lord who loved them so,

Singing glory, glory, glory.

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Because the Saviour shed his blood

To wash away their sin;

Bathed in that precious purple flood,

Behold them white and clean,

Singing glory, glory, glory.

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On earth they sought the Saviour’s grace,

On earth they loved his Name;

So now they see his blessed face,

And stand before the Lamb,

Singing glory, glory, glory.

Our saint died at Blackheath, Kent, England, in 1857.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

FEBRUARY 7, 2014 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT MOSES, APOSTLE TO THE SARACENS

THE FEAST OF SAINT APOLLONIA, MARTYR AT ALEXANDRIA

THE FEAST OF SAINT BLAISE OF SEBASTE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF GREGORIO ALLEGRI, COMPOSER

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring Anne Houlditch Shepherd

and all those who with words have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior, who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 728

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Feast of John Stainer and Walter Galpin Alcock (September 11)   Leave a comment

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Above:  Salisbury Cathedral, Between 1910 and 1920

Publisher and Copyright Claimant = Detroit Publishing Company

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-D4-73193

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SIR JOHN STAINER (JUNE 6, 1840-APRIL 1,1901)

Anglican Church Organist and Composer

taught

SIR WALTER GALPIN ALCOCK (DECEMBER 19, 1861-SEPTEMBER 11, 1947 )

Anglican Church Organist and Composer

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This post is one which falls into a certain pattern:  one saint led me to another.  In this case the pupil led me to the teacher.

John Stainer (1840-1901), born at London, England, was a chorister at St. Paul’s Cathedral there from 1847 to 1856.  At that tender age the prodigy began to compose church music and play the organ.  Aged only fourteen years, our saint became the Organist for St. Benet and St. Peter’s, Paul’s Wharf.  Two years later he left that church for St. Michael’s, Tenbury, where he fulfilled the same duties.  In 1859 Stainer began his studies at Oxford, where he became the Organist at Magdalen College.  From 1863 to 1872 he was the Organist of the University.  Then, from 1872 to 1888, Stainer served as the Organist at St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, where his musical journey had begun.

Stainer also taught the playing of the organ at the National Training School for Music, at which he became the Principal in 1881.  Our saint, knighted in 1888, taught at Oxford from 1889 to 1899.

Stainer edited hymnals, composed music, and wrote about music.  He wrote the Dictionary of Musical Terms and Early Bodleian Music:  Dufay and His Contemporaries, for example.  He composed anthems, an oratorio (Gideon), and cantatas:

  • The Daughter of Jairus (1878);
  • Saint Mary Madgalen (1883); and
  • The Crucifixion (1887).

Walter Galpin Alcock (1861-1947) was among Stainer’s pupils at the National Training School for Music.  Alcock, born  at Edenbridge, Kent, was also a prodigy.  In 1873 he became the Assistant Organist at St. Mary’s Church, Twickenham; he filled the Organist position six years later.  Alcock played the organ at the Church of the Annunciation, Portman Square, from 1887 to 1895, then at Holy Trinity, Sloane Square, from 1895 to 1902.  From 1896 to 1916 Alcock also functioned as the Assistant Organist at Westminster Abbey.  He served also as the Organist at the Chapel Royal from 1902 to 1916.  His final church assignment was at Salisbury Cathedral, where he was the Organist and Choirmaster from 1917 to his death in 1947.

Alcock, knighted in 1933, taught the organ at his alma mater, the National Training School for Music, and composed much church music for the organ.  He also played the organ for three coronations:  those for Edward VIII (reigned 1901-1910), George V (reigned 1910-1936), and George VI (1936-1952).

Good church music is invaluable; may nobody underestimate its worth.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 11, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT BARNABAS THE APOSTLE, COWORKER OF THE APOSTLE PAUL

THE FEAST OF VERNON JOHNS, NATIONAL BAPTIST PASTOR AND CIVIL RIGHTS PIONEER

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Eternal God, light of the world and Creator of all that is good and lovely:

We bless your name for inspiring John Stainer and Walter Galpin Alcock

and all who with music have filled us with desire and love for you;

through Jesus Christ our Savior, who with you and the Holy Spirit

lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 29:14b-19

Psalm 90:14-17

2 Corinthians 3:1-3

John 21:15-17, 24-25

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 728

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Feast of St. Patiens of Lyons (September 11)   Leave a comment

Above:  A Map of Gaul in the Roman Empire

SAINT PATIENS OF LYONS (DIED CIRCA 480)

Roman Catholic Archbishop

The 400s CE (labeled that after that fact) intrigue me.  In Western Europe the Western Roman Empire faded away, the title of Emperor entering the dustbin of history in 476.  The empire had gone away by then; its demise had been gradual.  St. Patiens witnessed the end of the Western Roman Empire; he outlived his country.

St. Patiens functioned as Archbishop of Lyons from circa 450.  He lived simply, led successful missionary efforts, resisted Arianism, and gave his income to help the poor.  He also had to cope with an invasion of Goths and to feed to thousands of people and supervise the rebuilding of many church buildings in the wake thereof.  And he oversaw the construction (as opposed to repair and rebuilding) of other church buildings.  St. Patiens won the approval of St. Sidonius Apollinaris, who wrote a laudatory poem about him.

St. Patiens was also a peacemaker.  The Bishop of Chalon-sur-Saone had died.  For some reason or set of reasons this event had created serious dissension in that diocese.  So St. Euphonius of Autun invited St. Patiens to participate in the reconciliation process.  Our saint accepted, of course.

(Aside:  I found almost no information about St. Euphonius of Autun.  I discovered variations on his name and at least two different years in which he might have died.  In simple terms, I know too little to write about him intelligently.)

St. Patiens also commissioned a priest, Constantius, to write a biography of St. Gemanus of Auxerre.  This work became famous and preserved facts of that saint’s life.

It seems that the main work of St. Patiens was to rebuilt the part of Christ’s Church of which he was shepherd.  And he did it well.  Faithfulness has not guaranteed success, of course.  St. Gregory Thaumaturgus began his episcopate with seventeen Christians, labored faithfully for decades, and died with seventeen Christians.  But tangible results must have bolstered the spirits of St. Patiens.

May we–you, O reader, and I–labor faithfully in the tasks God has appointed for us.  And, whether or not we see tangible results, may we not grow weary.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 20, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS FLAVIAN II OF ANTIOCH AND ELIAS OF JERUSALEM, ROMAN CATHOLIC PATRIARCHS

THE FEAST OF SAINT ANSEGIUS OF FONTANELLE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT

THE FEAST OF ELIZABETH CADY STANTON, AMELIA BLOOMER, SOJOURNER TRUTH, AND HARRIET ROSS TUBMAN, WITNESSES TO CIVIL RIGHTS FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS AND WOMEN

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Almighty God, you have surrounded us with a  great cloud of witnesses:

Grant that we, encouraged by the good example of your servant Saint Patiens of Lyons,

may persevere in running the race that is set before us,

until at last we may with him attain to your eternal joy;

through Jesus Christ, the pioneer and perfecter of our faith,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Micah 6:6-8

Psalm 15

Hebrews 12:1-2

Matthew 25:31-40

Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), page 724

Feast of St. Paphnutius the Great (September 11)   Leave a comment

Above:  A Trinitarian Symbol

SAINT PAPHNUTIUS THE GREAT (DIED CIRCA 350)

Also known as Saint Paphnutius the Confessor and Saint Paphnutius of Thebes

Roman Catholic Bishop of Upper Thebaid

Diocletian‘s Tetrarchy was still in effect in 306, when Constantine I “the Great” (reigned 306-337) became Augustus of the West.  From 310 to 313 his eastern counterpart was Mamiminus II Daia.  Reports of Constantine’s Christianity were greatly exaggerated, but Maximinus Daia was an unapologetic pagan and a severe persecutor of Christianity.  He, for example, required everyone in the eastern part of the Roman Empire to attend public sacrifices and to eat flesh of the sacrificial beasts.  And if one refused….Eusebius, in his great Ecclesiastical History, wrote of some of the faithful who became martyrs.  And others did not die yet suffered severely.  St. Paphnutius, for example was an Egyptian monk (under St. Anthony/Antony) who had become Bishop of Upper Thebaid.  His sentence was blinding in the right eye followed by hard labor in a mine.

In 313 Constantine I, as senior Augustus, pulled rank and ordered Maximinus II Daia to cease the persecution of Christians.  The junior Augustus obeyed reluctantly.  He knew what Constantine I did:  the future lay with the Church.  And although Constantine I was an opportunist who hitched the wagon of the Roman Empire to that star, Maximinus II Daia tried to resist the future.  That same year the junior Augustus died.  And his successor, Licinius, granted religious freedom to Christians in the East.

St. Paphnutius, released from the mine, became an ardent opponent of Arianism.  He also attended the Council of Nicaea (325), persuading the majority of his fellow bishops to permit married men to receive Holy Orders as priests and bishops although he opposed any post-ordination weddings.

Aside:  Follow this link to read my thoughts on sexual continence among the clergy.

I read accounts of saints such as St. Paphnutius and wonder how much I would be willing to suffer for Christ.  I am not nearly as courageous, I suspect.  Yet I have been fortunate, for nobody has put me to the test.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 20, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS FLAVIAN II OF ANTIOCH AND ELIAS OF JERUSALEM, ROMAN CATHOLIC PATRIARCHS

THE FEAST OF SAINT ANSEGIUS OF FONTANELLE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT

THE FEAST OF ELIZABETH CADY STANTON, AMELIA BLOOMER, SOJOURNER TRUTH, AND HARRIET ROSS TUBMAN, WITNESSES TO CIVIL RIGHTS FOR AFRICAN AMERICANS AND WOMEN

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Almighty God, we praise you for your servant Saint Paphnutius the Great,

through whom you have called the church to its tasks and renewed its life.

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your church and proclaim the reality of your reign,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

Saints’ Days and Holy Days for September   Leave a comment

Forget-Me-Nots

Image Source = Wilder Kaiser

1 (Dionysius Exiguus, Roman Catholic Monk and Reformer of the Calendar)

  • David Pendleton Oakerhater, Cheyenne Warrior, Chief, and Holy Man, and Episcopal Deacon and Missionary in Oklahoma
  • Fiacre, Roman Catholic Hermit
  • François Mauriac, French Roman Catholic Novelist, Christian Humanist, and Social Critic

2 (F. Crawford Burkitt, Anglican Scholar, Theologian, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator)

  • David Charles, Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Martyrs of New Guinea, 1942 and 1943
  • William of Roskilde, English-Danish Roman Catholic Bishop

3 (Jedediah Weiss, U.S. Moravian Craftsman, Merchant, and Musician)

  • Arthur Carl Lichtenberger, Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church and Witness for Civil Rights
  • James Bolan Lawrence, Episcopal Priest and Missionary in Southwestern Georgia, U.S.A.
  • Sundar Singh, Indian Christian Evangelist

4 (Paul Jones, Episcopal Bishop of Utah, and Peace Activist; and his colleague, John Nevin Sayre, Episcopal Priest and Peace Activist)

  • E. F. Schumacher, German-British Economist and Social Critic
  • Joseph and Mary Gomer, U.S. United Brethren Missionaries in Sierra Leone
  • William McKane, Scottish Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar

5 (Carl Johannes Sodergren, U.S. Lutheran Minister and Theologian; and his colleague, Claus August Wendell, Swedish-American Lutheran Minister and Theologian)

  • Athol Hill, Australian Baptist Biblical Scholar and Social Prophet
  • Teresa of Calcutta, Foundress of the Congregation of the Missionaries of Charity
  • William Morton Reynolds, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Episcopal Priest, Educator, and Hymn Translator

6 (Charles Fox, Anglican Missionary in Melanesia)

  • Aaron Robarts Wolfe, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Allen Crite, Artist
  • William F. Albright and G. Ernest Wright, U.S. Biblical Scholars and Archaeologists

7 (Beyers Naudé, South African Dutch Reformed Minister and Anti-Apartheid Activist)

  • Elie Naud, Huguenot Witness to the Faith
  • Jane Laurie Borthwick and Sarah Borthwick Findlater, Scottish Presbyterian Translators of Hymns
  • John Duckett and Ralph Corby, Roman Catholic Priests and Martyrs in England, 1644

8 (Nikolai Grundtvig, Danish Lutheran Minister, Bishop, Historian, Philosopher, Poet, Educator, and Hymn Writer)

  • Gottfried Wilhelm Sacer, German Lutheran Attorney and Hymn Writer; and Frances Elizabeth Cox, English Hymn Writer and Translator
  • Shepherd Knapp, U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Søren Kierkegaard, Danish Philosopher and Theologian, and Father of Existentialism

9 (Martyrs of Memphis, Tennessee, 1878)

  • Francis Borgia, “Second Founder of the Society of Jesus;” Peter Faber, Apostle of Germany, and Cofounder of the Society of Jesus; Alphonsus Rodriguez, Spanish Jesuit Lay Brother; and Peter Claver, “Apostle to the Negroes”
  • Lynn Harold Hough, U.S. Methodist Minister, Theologian, and Biblical Scholar
  • William Chatterton Dix, English Hymn Writer and Hymn Translator

10 (Alexander Crummell, U.S. African-American Episcopal Priest, Missionary, and Moral Philosopher)

  • Mordecai Johnson, Educator
  • Nemesian of Sigum and His Companions, Roman Catholic Bishops and Martyrs, 257
  • Salvius of Albi, Roman Catholic Bishop

11 (Paphnutius the Great, Roman Catholic Bishop of Upper Thebaid)

  • Anne Houlditch Shepherd, Anglican Novelist and Hymn Writer
  • John Stainer and Walter Galpin Alcock, Anglican Church Organists and Composers
  • Patiens of Lyons, Roman Catholic Archbishop

12 (Frederick J. Murphy, U.S. Roman Catholic Biblical Scholar)

  • Franciscus Ch’oe Kyong-Hwan, Korean Roman Catholic Catechist and Martyr, 1839; Lawrence Mary Joseph Imbert, Pierre Philibert Maubant, and Jacques Honoré Chastán, French Roman Catholic Priests, Missionaries to Korea, and Martyrs, 1839; Paul Chong Hasang, Korean Roman Catholic Seminarian and Martyr, 1839; and Cecilia Yu Sosa and Jung Hye, Korean Roman Catholic Martyrs, 1839
  • Kaspar Bienemann, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer
  • William Josiah Irons, Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Translator; and his daughter, Genevieve Mary Irons, Roman Catholic Hymn Writer

13 (Peter of Chelcic, Bohemian Hussite Reformer; and Gregory the Patriach, Founder of the Moravian Church)

  • Godfrey Thring, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • Jane Crewdson, English Quaker Poet and Hymn Writer
  • Narayan Seshadri of Jalna, Indian Presbyterian Evangelist and “Apostle to the Mangs”

14 (HOLY CROSS)

15 (Martyrs of Birmingham, Alabama, September 15, 1963)

  • Charles Edward Oakley, Anglican Priest and Hymn Writer
  • James Chisholm, Episcopal Priest
  • Philibert and Aicardus of Jumieges, Roman Catholic Abbots

16 (Cyprian of Carthage, Bishop and Martyr, 258; and Cornelius, Lucius I, and Stephen I, Bishops of Rome)

  • George Henry Trabert, U.S. Lutheran Minister, Missionary, and Hymn Translator and Author
  • James Francis Carney, U.S.-Honduran Roman Catholic Priest, Missionary, Revolutionary, and Martyr, 1983
  • Martin Behm, German Lutheran Minister and Hymn Writer

17 (Jutta of Disibodenberg, Roman Catholic Abbess; and her student, Hildegard of Bingen, Roman Catholic Abbess and Composer)

  • Gerard Moultrie, Anglican Priest, Hymn Writer, and Translator of Hymns
  • Zygmunt Szcesny Felinski, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Warsaw, Titutlar Bishop of Tarsus, and Founder of Recovery for the Poor and the Congregation of the Franciscan Sisters of the Family of Mary
  • Zygmunt Sajna, Polish Roman Catholic Priest and Martyr, 1940

18 (Dag Hammarskjöld, Secretary-General of the United Nations)

  • Edward Bouverie Pusey, Anglican Priest
  • Henry Lascelles Jenner, Anglican Bishop of Dunedin, New Zealand
  • John Campbell Shairp, Scottish Poet and Educator

19 (Theodore of Tarsus, Archbishop of Canterbury)

  • Emily de Rodat, Founder of the Congregation of the Holy Family of Villefranche
  • Walter Chalmers Smith, Scottish Presbyterian Minister and Hymn Writer
  • William Dalrymple Maclagan, Archbishop of York and Hymn Writer

20 (Henri Nouwen, Dutch Roman Catholic Priest and Spiritual Writer)

  • John Coleridge Patteson, Anglican Bishop of Melanesia, and His Companions, Martyrs, 1871
  • Marie Therese of Saint Joseph, Foundress of the Congregation of the Carmelite Sisters of the Divine Heart of Jesus
  • Nelson Wesley Trout, First African-American U.S. Lutheran Bishop

21 (MATTHEW THE EVANGELIST, APOSTLE AND MARTYR)

22 (Philander Chase, Episcopal Bishop of Ohio, and of Illinois; and Presiding Bishop)

  • C. H. Dodd, Welsh Congregationalist Minister, Theologian, and Biblical Scholar
  • Charlotte Elliott, Julia Anne Elliott, and Emily Elliott, Anglican Hymn Writers
  • Justus Falckner, Lutheran Pastor and Hymn Writer

23 (Amos Niven Wilder, U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Poet, Literary Critic, and Biblical Scholar)

  • Bernhard W. Anderson, U.S. United Methodist Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • Elizabeth Kenny, Australian Nurse and Medical Pioneer
  • Francisco de Paula Victor, Brazilian Roman Catholic Priest

24 (Anna Ellison Butler Alexander, African-American Episcopal Deaconess in Georgia, and Educator)

  • Henry Hart Milman, Anglican Dean, Translator, Historian, Theologian, and Hymn Writer
  • Juvenal of Alaska, Russian Orthodox Martyr in Alaska, and First Orthodox Martyr in the Americas, 1796
  • Peter the Aleut, Russian Orthodox Martyr in San Francisco, 1815

25 (Sarah Louise “Sadie” Delany, African-American Educator; her sister, Annie Elizabeth “Bessie” Delany, African-American Dentist; and their brother, Hubert Thomas Delany, African-American Attorney, Judge, and Civil Rights Activist)

  • Euphrosyne and her father, Paphnutius of Alexandria, Monks
  • Herman of Reichenau, Roman Catholic Monk, Liturgist, Poet, and Scholar
  • Sergius of Radonezh, Abbot of the Monastery of the Holy Trinity, Sergiyev Posad, Russia

26 (Paul VI, Bishop of Rome)

  • Frederick William Faber, English Roman Catholic Hymn Writer
  • John Bright, U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Biblical Scholar
  • John Byrom, Anglican then Quaker Poet and Hymn Writer

27 (Francis de Sales, Roman Catholic Bishop of Geneva; Vincent de Paul, “The Apostle of Charity;’ Louise de Marillac, Cofounder of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul; and Charles Fuge Lowder, Founder of the Society of the Holy Cross)

  • Eliza Scudder, U.S. Unitarian then Episcopalian Hymn Writer
  • Martyrs of Melanesia, 1864-2003

28 (Jehu Jones, Jr., African-American Lutheran Minister)

  • Joseph Hoskins, English Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer
  • Lorenzo Ruiz, Roman Catholic Martyr

29 (Mary Ramabai, Prophetic Witness and Evangelist in India)

  • Francis Turner Palgrave, Anglican Poet, Art Critic, and Hymn Writer

30 (Honorius, Archbishop of Canterbury)

Floating

  • Labor Day

 

Lowercase boldface on a date with two or more commemorations indicates a primary feast.