Archive for the ‘Saints of 1870-1879’ Category

Feast of Charles Winfred Douglas (January 19)   1 comment

Above:  Portrait of Charles Winfred Douglas

Scanned from The Hymnal 1940 Companion (1949), a volume dedicated to his “dear and honored memory”

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CHARLES WINFRED DOUGLAS (FEBRUARY 15, 1867-JANUARY 18, 1944)

Episcopal Priest, Liturgist, Musicologist, Linguist, Poet, Hymn Translator, and Arranger

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He [Douglas] began his career dedicated to the Praise of God.  He ended his life with the Praise of God on his mind and pen, and in his heart.

The Hymnal 1940 Companion (1949), 422

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Canon Charles Winfred Douglas comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via two hymnals and their companion volumes.  The hymnals are, in order of publication:

  1. The Hymnal (1941), of the old Evangelical and Reformed Church; and
  2. The Hymnal 1940 (1943), of The Episcopal Church.

Douglas was a native of the State of New York.  He, born in Oswego on February 15, 1867, was a son of Virgil Chittendon Douglas and Caroline Church Douglas.  While an undergraduate at Syracuse University, our saint worked as the assistant organist at St. Paul’s Cathedral, Syracuse.  Douglas, upon graduating with his B.Mus. degree (1891), served as an instructor in vocal music at Syracuse University.  Starting in 1892, our saint worked as the organist and choirmaster of the Church of Zion and St. Timothy, New York, New York.  In 1893, after graduating from St. Andrew’s Divinity School, Syracuse, Douglas joined the Sacred Order of Deacons.  He was the Curate of the Church of the Redeemer, New York, New York, for a few months.  Then our saint became seriously ill.  He went to the West to recover.

Douglas’s base of operations, for a time, was Colorado.  He undertook an outdoors lifestyle, due to lung trouble.  In September 1894, our saint became a minor canon at the Cathedral of St. John in the Wilderness, Denver.  Later, he moved to Evergreen.  There Douglas founded the Mission (now Church) of the Transfiguration.  The first service occurred on December 25, 1897.  In Colorado, our saint’s doctors included Mary Josepha Williams (d. March 9, 1938).  He married her in 1896.  The couple had a son, Frederic Huntington Douglas.  Our saint, who continued his theological education at St. Matthew’s Hall, Denver, became a priest in 1899.  He served at the Mission of the Transfiguration, in an associate capacity, until 1907.  While based in Colorado, Douglas traveled in and studied music in England, France, and Germany (1903-1904, 1905-1906).

Douglas was a fine musician and musicologist.  He, a resident canon at Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin (1907-1911), then an honorary canon there, was an expert on plainsong.  He even served as the President of the American Plainsong Society.  Our saint was also a Fellow and the Chairman of the Department of Music of the American Ecclesiological Society.  Furthermore, he taught at the Summer School of Church Music, Cambridge and Wellesley, Massachusetts (1915-1924).  Nashotah House awarded Douglas a honorary degree in music (1916).  He collaborated with Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943) on Songs of the Church (1920).  Douglas and Rachmaninov helped to popularize music of the Russian Orthodox Church in the United States.  Our saint also worked with Kurt Schinder (1882-1935) on Twelve Old Spanish Motets (1913-1919).

Douglas’s other published works, as author, editor, music editor, composer, or arranger, included:

  1. Cantica Eucharistica:  Choral Devotions to the Blessed Sacrament (1910);
  2. Mission Hymnal (1913);
  3. Ordinary and Canon of the Mass (1913);
  4. The Canticles at Evensong (1915);
  5. The Order of Matins (1916);
  6. The Psalms of David (1917);
  7. The Hymnal 1916 (1919);
  8. The St. Dunstan’s Psalter (1923);
  9. The Ceremonial Noted (1923);
  10. The Choral Service (1927);
  11. The American Psalter (1929);
  12. The American Missal (1931);
  13. The Monastic Diurnal (1932);
  14. The American Plainsong Psalter (1932);
  15. The St. Dunstan’s Kyrial (1933);
  16. The Midnight Mass, and Other Poems (1933);
  17. Selected Hymns and Carols (1936), with its Brief Commentary (1936);
  18. Church Music in History and Practice:  Studies in the Praise of God (1937);
  19. A Missionary Service Book (1937);
  20. The Chorales from the Organ Works of Brahms (1939-1944);
  21. Magnificat (1940); and
  22. The Hymnal 1940 (1943).

Douglas had a relationship to the Community of Saint Mary, which Harriet Starr Cannon (1823-1896) founded in 1865.  He was the director of music to the community at Peekskill, New York (1906-1944) and the chaplain to the western province, based in Kenosha, Wisconsin (1934-1944).

Douglas served in the The Episcopal Church in other capacities, too.  He was a trustee of Nashotah House.  Our saint’s legacy (as a hymn translator, a hymn tune arranger, and a hymn tune composer) enriches the denomination’s hymnals, starting with The Hymnal 1916 (1919), continuing in The Hymnal 1940 (1943), and persisting with The Hymnal 1982 (1985).

Colorado was home.  Douglas, a collector of an expert in indigenous American art, became an honorary canon at the Cathedral of St. John the Wilderness, Denver, in 1934.  Three years later, our saint returned to the Mission of the Transfiguration, Evergreen, as its vicar.  He served through 1943.  He also served as the program annotator of and sat on the governing board of the Denver Symphony Orchestra from 1937 to 1941.  Douglas, widowed in 1938, married Anne Woodward on March 27, 1940.

Douglas’s final projects were The Hymnal 1940 (1943) and The Hymnal 1940 Companion (1949).  Anne worked with him on the companion volume.  At the end of his life, our saint was reviewing corrections for The Hymnal 1940 (1943).  He and Anne were in Santa Rosa, California, working with Father Arthur W. Farlander on the companion volume on January 18, 1944.  There, Douglas, aged 76 years, died.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 4, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF PAUL JONES, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF UTAH, AND PEACE ACTIVIST; AND HIS COLLEAGUE, JOHN NEVIN SAYRE, EPISCOPAL PRIEST AND PEACE ACTIVIST

THE FEAST OF SAINT BIRINUS OF DORCHESTER, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF DORCHESTER, AND THE “APOSTLE OF WESSEX”

THE FEAST OF E. F. SCHUMACHER, GERMAN-BRITISH ECONOMIST AND SOCIAL CRITIC

THE FEAST OF SAINT GORAZD OF PRAGUE, ORTHODOX BISHOP OF MORAVIA AND SILESIA, METROPOLITAN OF THE CZECH LANDS AND SLOVAKIA, HIERARCH OF THE ORTHODOX CHURCH IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA, AND MARTYR, 1942

THE FEAST OF WILLIAM MCKANE, SCOTTISH PRESBYTERIAN MINISTER AND BIBLICAL SCHOLAR

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Charles Winfred Douglas)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Feast of Timothy Richard Matthews (January 16)   Leave a comment

Above:  Timothy Richard Matthews

Image in the Public Domain

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TIMOTHY RICHARD MATTHEWS (NOVEMBER 4, 1826-JANUARY 5, 1910)

Anglican Priest, Organist, and Hymn Writer

Timothy Richard Matthews comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Hymnal (1941), of the old Evangelical and Reformed Church.

Matthews was an Anglican priest and a church musician.  Our saint, born in Colmworth (near Bedford), England, on November 4, 1826, was a son of the Rector of Colmworth.  Young Timothy graduated from Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge (A.B., 1853).  Matthews, ordained that year, took on two positions.  Our saint became the private tutor to the Reverend Lord Wriothesley Russell, a canon of St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle.  That year, Matthews also became the Curate of St. Mary’s, Nottingham (-1859).  While at Nottingham, he founded the Working Men’s Institute.

While tutoring Russell’s family, Matthews met Sir George Job Elvey (1816-1893).  Our saint became one of Elvey’s organ students.  The two men also became lifelong friends.  Matthews’s musical talents extended to composition.  He composed settings of Morning Prayer and Evening Prayer.  He also wrote and edited books:

  1. Tunes for Holy Worship (1859),
  2. The Village-Church Tune-Book (1859),
  3. Congregational Melodies (1862),
  4. Hymn Tunes (1867),
  5. North Coates Supplemental Tune Book (1878), and
  6. The Village Organist (1877).

Furthermore, our saint composed at least one hymn (“The Sanctuary of My Soul“) and more than 100 hymn tunes.

Matthews served as the Rector of North Coates, Lincolnshire (1859-1907).  Then he, a widower, retired and moved into the vicarage at Tetney, where his eldest son was in residence as the vicar.

Our saint, aged 83 years, died at Tetney, Lincolnshire, on January 5, 1910.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF THE MARTYRS OF NEW GUINEA, 1942 AND 1943

THE FEAST OF DAVID CHARLES, WELSH CALVINISTIC METHODIST MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF DIANNA ORTIZ, U.S. ROMAN CATHOLIC NUN AND ANTI-TORTURE ACTIVIST

THE FEAST OF SAINT WILLIAM OF ROSKILDE, ENGLISH-DANISH ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF ROSKILDE

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Timothy Richard Matthews)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Feast of Blessed Juana Maria Condesa Lluch (January 16)   2 comments

Above:  The Flag of Valencia, Spain

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED JUANA MARÍA CONDESA LLUCH (MARCH 30, 1862-JANUARY 16, 1916)

Founder of the Congregation of the Handmaids of the Immaculate Conception, Protectress of Workers

Blessed Juana María Condesa Lluch comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Sainits’ Days and Holy Days, via the Roman Catholic Church.

Blessed Juana, born in Valencia, Spain, on March 30, 1862, came from a wealthy and devout family with a strong sense of social responsibility.  Our saint grew up with a healthy prayer life and a desire to help the poor.

Blessed Juana focused on helping the exploited, dehumanized industrial workers and their children.  These families, most of whom had moved from the countryside and into cities, faced daunting challenges.  Wages were low, work days were long, suitable housing was scarce, and factories were death traps.  Our saint, at the tender age of 18 years, discerned her vocation to found a religious order committed to helping exploited workers and their children.  Ecclesiastical doubts regarding Blessed Juana’s youth delayed her work until 1884.  That year, she opened a shelter for industrial workers and their children, and began to provide spiritual formation programs.  A few months later, our saint opened a school for children of factory workers.  Other young women joined her in this work.  The foundations of the Congregation of the Handmaids of the Immaculate Conception, Protectress of Workers (formally founded in 1892) were coming together.  The sisters made their first vows in 1895 and their perpetual professions in 1911.

Blessed Juana and her sisters performed their good and necessary works.  She, who aspired to become the “handmaid of the Lord,” encouraged the sisters to live in complete confidence in God, and to live the Beatitudes.

Blessed Juana–Mother Juana–died in Valencia, Spain, on January 16, 1916.  She was 54 years old.

Pope John Paul II declared our saint a Venerable in 1997 then beatified her in 2003.

Sadly, the exploitation of workers–for the purpose of maximizing profits–continues.  Therefore, the need for the type of work in which the Congregation of the Handmaids of the Immaculate Conception, Protectress of Workers, persists.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

SEPTEMBER 1, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT DIONYSIUS EXIGUUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK AND REFORMER OF THE CALENDAR

THE FEAST OF DAVID PENDLETON OAKERHATER, CHEYENNE WARRIOR, CHIEF, AND HOLY MAN, AND EPISCOPAL DEACON AND MISSIONARY IN OKLAHOMA

THE FEAST OF SAINT FIACRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC HERMIT

THE FEAST OF FRANÇOIS MAURIAC, FRENCH ROMAN CATHOLIC NOVELIST, CHRISTIAN HUMANIST, AND SOCIAL CRITIC

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served,

and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom

the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 60

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Feast of Edward Bunnett (January 16)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Flag of England

Image in the Public Domain

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EDWARD BUNNETT (JUNE 26, 1834-JANUARY 5, 1923)

Anglican Organist and Composer

Edward Bunnett comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Hymnal (1941), of the old Evangelical and Reformed Church.

Bunnett served God via music.  our saint, born in Shipdham, Norfolk, England, on June 26, 1834, became a chorister at the Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Cathedral, Norwich, when he was eight years old.  When our saint was fifteen years old, he began to study the organ under the tutelage of Dr. Zechariah Buck (1798-1877), organist at Norwich Cathedral (1819-1877).  Bunnett, the assistant organist at Norwich Cathedral (1855-1877), also had a fine singing voice.  In 1849, he performed Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s “Lift Thine Eyes” with opera star Jenny Lind (1820-1887), the “Swedish Nightingale.”  Our saint continued his formal studies at Cambridge, earning a Mus.B. (1857) and Mus.D. (1869).  In 1870, he became a Fellow of the College of Organists.

Bunnett, renowned for his virtuosity, taught, performed, and composed.  He became the organist of St. Peter Mancraft Church, Norwich, in 1877.  As the borough organist (1880f), our saint performed in well-attended concerts.  He also conducted the Norwich Musical Union for 21 years and performed in local musical festivals for more than 20 years.  Bunnett taught many organists, too.  His compositions included works for the organ, liturgical music and at least 21 hymn tunes and Christmas carols.

Links to YouTube videos of some of Bunnett’s compositions follow:

  1. Allegro moderato in G Major,
  2. Concluding Voluntary, and
  3. KIRBY BEDON.

Our saint, aged 88 years, died in Norwich on January 5, 1923.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 30, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT NICODEMUS, DISCIPLE OF JESUS

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Edward Bunnett)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Feast of Blessed Maria Dolores Rodriguez Sopena y Ortega (January 10)   2 comments

Above:  Blessed María Dolores Rodríguez Sopeña y Ortega

Image in the Public Domain

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BLESSED MARÍA DOLORES RODRÍGUEZ SOPEÑA Y ORTEGA

(DECEMBER 30, 1848-JANUARY 10, 1918)

Founder of the Centers of Instruction, the Association of the Sodality of the Virgin Mary, the Ladies of the Catechetical Institute, the Association of the Apostolic Laymen/the Sopeña Lay Movement, the Works of the Doctrines/the Center for the Workers, and the Social and Cultural Work Sopeña/the Sopeña Catechetical Institute

Blessed María Dolores Rodríguez Sopeña y Ortega comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via the Roman Catholic Church.

Blessed María came from a devout Spanish family.  She, born in Velez Rubio on December 30, 1848, was the fourth of seven children of Nicolasa Ortega Salomon and Tomas Rodríguez Sopeña.  He worked as the administrator of the Marqueses de Velez farms before getting a job as a magistrate in 1866.

Blessed María spent most of her life helping the less fortunate.  She, not caring about status and materialism, valued “the least of these.”  In Almeria, where her father was the judge (1866-1869), our saint, who had poor eyesight, helped her sisters, afflicted with typhoid fever.  She also ministered to a leper.  In 1869, Tomas transferred to Puerto Rico and took a son with him.  The rest of the family moved to Madrid.  Blessed María commenced catechetical work with women in prison, patents in the Princess Hospital, and pupils in Sunday Schools.

The family reunited in Puerto Rico in 1872.  There, Blessed María, 24 years old, tried to join the Sisters of Charity the following year.  Her poor eyesight prevented our saint from joining that order.  Blessed María, therefore, struck out on her own.  She began to work in impoverished neighborhoods and founded the Centers for Instruction.  The curriculum consisted of the catechism and general instruction.  Medical assistance was also available.  Blessed María also founded the Association of the Sodality of the Virgin Mary, members of which staffed the Centers for Instruction.

After Nicolasa died in 1877, the family returned to Madrid later that year. Blessed María spent the next six years taking care of her father and tending to the less fortunate.  Then Tomas died in 1883.  Our saint, struggling to find her vocation, joined a Salesian convent in 1883.  Ten days later, she left it.  The contemplative life did not fit our saint.

Blessed María vocation was social work, especially with women.  She formalized community centers for this social work as part of a new organization, Works of the Doctrines, in 1885.  Eventually, this organization took the name “Center for the Workers.”

In Madrid, in 1892, Blessed María founded the Association of the Apostolic Laymen (now the Sopeña Lay Movement).  The work of this order expanded into eight neighborhoods in Madrid the following year.

Our saint expanded her apostolic work across Spain in 1896.  She founded the Ladies of the Catechetical Institute in Toledo in 1901.  The following year, Blessed María founded the Social and Cultural Work Sopeña (now the Sopeña Catechetical Institute.  She became this order’s Superior General in 1910.

The Sopeña Catechetical Institute expanded into the Americas in 1917.

Blessed María, aged 69 years, died in Madrid on January 10, 1918.

Pope John Paul II declared our saint a Venerable in 1992 then beatified her in 2003.

Blessed María’s institutional legacy continues via the Sopeña Catechetical Institute and the Sopeña Lay Movement.

Consider two words, O reader.  Those words are orthodoxy and orthopraxy.  Orthodoxy is right belief.  Orthopraxy is right practice.  The two are properly like two sides of a coin.  One is like what one does, and as one thinks, one does and is.  When I consider elements of conventional Christian orthodoxy in the past and the present, I find a mixed bag of healthy spirituality and spiritual creepy crawlies.  I, as a student of history, know from primary sources that many Americans defended racially-defined, chattel slavery by quoting the Bible, for example.  I also recall reading such arguments recycled, well into the twentieth century, to justify Jim Crow.  I know, from the words of those who made these arguments, that these were matters, partially, of scriptural authority for those advocates.

The standard to follow is love–not vague love, not puppy love, not make-people-feel-good-for-now love.  The standard to follow is love.  Love builds up people.  Love is tangible.  Love is selfless.  Love hurts sometimes, too.  Love is willing to accompany a beloved one through hell.

Blessed María loved “the least of these.”  In doing so, she demonstrated her love of Jesus.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 28, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT AMBROSE OF MILAN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP. SAINT MONICA OF HIPPO, MOTHER OF SAINT AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO; AND SAINT AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP OF HIPPO REGIUS

THE FEAST OF DENIS WORTMAN, U.S. DUTCH REFORMED MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF EDMOND L. BUDRY, SWISS REFORMED, HYMN WRITER, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF LAURA S. COPERHAVER, U.S. LUTHERAN HYMN WRITER AND MISSIONARY LEADER

THE FEAST OF SAINT MOSES THE BLACK, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK, ABBOT, AND MARTYR

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O God, your Son came among us to serve and not to be served,

and to give his life for the life of the world.

Lead us by his love to serve all those to whom

the world offers no comfort and little help.

Through us give hope to the hopeless,

love to the unloved,

peace to the troubled,

and rest to the weary,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), 60

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Feast of Johann Josef Ignaz von Dollinger (January 9)   Leave a comment

Above:  Johann Josef Ignaz von Döllinger

Image in the Public Domain

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JOHANN JOSEF IGNAZ VON DÖLLINGER (FEBRUARY 28, 1799-JANUARY 10, 1890)

Dissident and Excommunicated Roman Catholic Priest, Theologian, and Historian

INTRODUCTION

Father Johann Josef Ignaz von Dõllinger comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via historical accounts.  He also comes here via a pupil, John Dalberg Acton (1834-1902).

I confess readily to my relationship to authority.  I am neither an anarchist nor an unconditional conformist.  I chafe against all forms of authoritarianism.  With the common good (defined by mutuality) and the Golden Rule as my core principles, I evaluate what authority figures say and do.  Theologically, I feel free to ask any question and to harbor any doubt I choose.  I gladly accept the label “heretic” from people.  In fact, I own and wear a T-shirt with “heretic” printed on the front.  Yet I am, compared to many people I know, orthodox.  According to fundamentalists, however, I am a Hellbound heretic.  So be it.  I call myself an Episcopalian.

Sometimes I poke my proverbial fingers into the equally proverbial eyes of authority figures because they deserve no less.  We are all “but dust.”  Even authority figures are mere mortals.  Somebody has to remind some of them of that.

I follow my own interests and march to the beat of my own drum.  Therefore, I am a default contrarian much of the time.  Many of my interests are outside of the mainstream, or at least of little or no interest to most people around me.  I feel no compulsion to keep up with “watercooler” topics of discussion either.  If I wanted to break the ice, I would have joined the crew of a ship with a reinforced hull long ago.

I grew up a Protestant–a United Methodist, mainly.  The rebelliousness hardwired into Protestantism appealed to my personality.  (It still does.)  Yet my sense of history led me toward Holy Mother Church.  Instead of crossing the Tiber River, I became an Episcopalian.  I have turned into an Anglican-Lutheran-Catholic.  (The Middle Way, indeed!)

Given all that, O reader, you may not be surprised to read that Father Döllinger catches and holds my attention.  I like him.  I disagree with him on certain points.  Of course, if agreeing with me on all points were a criteria for inclusion on my Ecumenical Calendar, the project would not exist.  I do agree with Döllinger’s rejection of papal infallibility.  I also conclude that anyone who got on the bad side of the reactionary Pope Pius IX could not have been all bad.

The article about Döllinger in The Catholic Encyclopedia (1907-1912) offers a hardline evaluation, not surprisingly:

Seldom has it been so clearly proven that whenever a man turns completely from a glorious and honourable past, however stormy, his fate is irrevocably sealed.

Consider the source, O reader.

HIS LIFE

Johann Josef Ignaz von Döllinger, born in Bamberg, Electorate of Bavaria, Holy Roman Empire, on February 28, 1799, came from a line of physicians and professors of medicine.  His grandfather had founded the medical faculty at the University of Bamberg.  Our saint’s father taught medicine at the University of Bamberg (-1803) then at the University of Würzberg (1803f).  Döllinger, a bookworm from an early age, mastered French, Italian, and Spanish.  At the University of Würzberg, our saint studied science, theology, philosophy, and law.  Seminary followed in Bamberg (1820-1822).

Döllinger became a priest on April 22, 1822.  This displeased his father, who (a) wanted the son to lead an academic career, and (b) considered leading a celibate life to be physically impossible.  Our saint, briefly a chaplain, led an academic career, with the aid of his father.  Döllinger started teaching canon law in Aschaffenburg from November 1823 to 1827.  During this time, he received his Doctor of Theology degree.  Our saint relocated to Munich, the capital of the Kingdom of Bavaria, in 1827.  He taught canon law and church history.  Döllinger also served as a canon of the royal chapel of St. Cajetan (1839f) and as the provost, or head canon (1847f).

Dollinger’s relatively liberal politics–including support for constitutional government–got him into trouble.  It cost him his professorship in 1847, although he got that position back in 1850.  In 1871, Döllinger’s refusal to accept the new dogma of papal infallibility got him into deep trouble with Rome.  This act of conscience led to excommunication that year and dismissal from the professorship the following year.  Fortunately for our saint, he had the favor of the Kings of Bavaria.  Döllinger held various royal appointments–academic and scientific positions–and continued to research, write, and publish for the rest of his life.

Döllinger was sui generis.  He was too liberal for traditionalists and too traditional for hardcore German Liberals.  Our saint’s church was the ancient Catholic Church, not the Roman Catholic Church with an infallible Supreme Pontiff.  Schism was anathema to Döllinger.  He was unambiguous in criticizing Protestantism (in 1838, 1843, and 1851, in particular).  The excommunicated priest, who influenced the new Old Catholic Church, refused to join it while harboring no hostility toward it.  Our saint’s insistence of academic freedom made him many enemies in ecclesiastical circles, too.

Döllinger, who refused attempts to persuade him to reconcile with Rome, died in Munich, Kingdom of Bavaria, German Empire, on January 10, 1890.  He was 90 years old.

CONCLUSION

Certain issues at play in Döllinger’s life remain pertinent, sadly.

  1. The lack of academic freedom in schools, colleges, and universities in more than one denomination remains problematic.
  2. Dissent has a legitimate role in the Church.  Some limits need to exist, of course; certain standards should apply.  Yet the quest for doctrinal purity is a fool’s errand.  Some of the self-identified pure are purer than others.  The “purer” the tent is, the smaller and more Donatistic it is.
  3. Schism is a matter to approach with extreme caution, and should be a last resort.

Given the ecclesiastical standards that have unfolded and continue to unfold, what did Döllinger do that warranted excommunication?  He apparently honored his vow of celibacy.  He did not disavow the Holy Trinity.  He did not molest anyone.  He did not abuse indigenous children at residential schools in Canada.   Our saint’s alleged offenses seemed to have been asking “too many” questions and refusing to accept a new dogma.

Sola Scriptura, in the narrow definition, holds that nothing outside of scripture is necessary for salvation.  I read about Döllinger and conclude that his refusal to accept papal infallibility did not endanger his salvation.  I conclude that, in the mind of God, the excommunication was irrelevant.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 26, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JOHN PAUL I, BISHOP OF ROME

THE FEAST OF FREDERICK WILLIAM HERZBERGER, U.S. LUTHERAN MINISTER, HUMANITARIAN, AND HYMN TRANSLATOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT LEVKADIA HARASYMIV, UKRAINIAN GREEK CATHOLIC NUN, AND MARTYR, 1952

THE FEAST OF SAINTS LUIGI BELTRAME QUATTROCCHI AND MARIA CORSINI BELTRAME QUATTROCCHI, ITALIAN ROMAN CATHOLIC HUMANITARIANS

THE FEAST OF SAINT TERESA OF JESUS, JORNET Y IBARS, CATALAN CATHOLIC NUN AND CO-FOUNDER OF THE LITTLE SISTERS OF THE ABANDONED ELDERLY

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Almighty God, you gave to your servant Johann Josef Ignaz von Döllinger

special gifts of grace to understand and teach the truth as it in Christ Jesus:

Grant that by this teaching we may know you,

the one true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

Proverbs 3:1-7

Psalm 119:89-96

1 Corinthians 3:5-11

Matthew 13:47-52

–Adapted from Holy Women, Holy Men:  Celebrating the Saints (2010), 721

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Feast of Josiah Booth (December 30)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Flag of England

Image in the Public Domain

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JOSIAH BOOTH (MARCH 27, 1852-DECEMBER 29, 1929)

English Organist, Hymn Writer, and Hymn Tune Composer

Josiah Booth comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Hymnal (1941), of the old Evangelical and Reformed Church.

Booth made a strong musical contribution to the Church.  He, born in Coventry, England, on March 27, 1852, studied music under composer and organist Edward Simms (1800-1893).  Then our saint studied under composers Henry Brinley Richards (1817-1885) and George Alexander Macfarren (1813-1887) at the Royal Academy of Music.  Booth served as the organist of Marlborough Road Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (now Methodist Church), Banbury, from 1868 to 1877.  Then Booth served as the organist at Park Chapel (Congregational), Crough End, London, from 1877 to 1918.

Park Chapel (Congregational) amalgamated with Ferme Park Baptist Church to form the Union Church and Community Centre in 1974.

Booth composed chants, hymn tunes, church services, anthems, school operettas, a cantata (The Day of Rest), an oratorio (Nehemiah, 1885), at least one hymn text (“Jesus Can keep Little Children“), and hymn tunes.  The hymn tunes included:

  1. COMMONWEALTH,
  2. HOLY WAR, and
  3. NORTHREPPS.

Booth’s published works included:

  1. Part II of the Congregational Church Hymnal (1888), as Musical Editor;
  2. Everybody’s Guide to Music (1893);
  3. A Selection of One Hundred Tunes (1909); and
  4. The Congregational Hymnal (1916), as musical consultant.

Booth, elected an Associate of the Royal Academy of Music (1904), died in Crouch End, London, on December 29, 1929.  He was 77 years old.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 23, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS MARTIN DE PORRES AND JUAN MACIAS, HUMANITARIANS AND DOMINICAN LAY BROTHERS; SAINT ROSE OF LIMA, HUMANITARIAN AND DOMINICAN SISTER; AND SAINT TURIBIUS OF MOGROVEJO, ROMAN CATHOLIC ARCHBISHOP OF LIMA

THE FEAST OF SAINT FRANCISZEK DACHTERA, POLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND MARTYR, 1944

THE FEAST OF GEERT GROOTE, FOUNDER OF THE BRETHREN OF THE COMMON LIFE

THE FEAST OF THEODORE O. WEDEL, EPISCOPAL PRIEST AND BIBLICAL SCHOLAR; AND HIS WIFE, CYNTHIA CLARKE WEDEL, U.S. PSYCHOLOGIST AND EPISCOPAL ECUMENIST

THE FEAST OF THOMAS AUGUSTINE JUDGE, U.S. ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST; FOUNDER OF THE MISSIONARY SERVANTS OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY, THE MISSIONARY SERVANTS OF THE MOST BLESSED TRINITY, AND THE MISSIONARY CENACLE APOSTOLATE

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Josiah Booth)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Feast of Henry Schwing (December 23)   Leave a comment

Above:  The Flag of Maryland

Image in the Public Domain

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HENRY SCHWING (DECEMBER 26, 1825-JANUARY 19, 1907)

U.S. Organist and Music Editor

“The Grand Old Man of Maryland Music”

Henry Schwing comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Hymnal (1941), of the old Evangelical and Reformed Church.

Above:  Mount Vernon Place Methodist Episcopal Church, Baltimore, Maryland

Image Source = Matthew Simpson, Cyclopaedia of Methodism (1878), 81

Schwing was a church musician and a music educator.  He, born in Germany on December 26, 1825, relocated to Baltimore, Maryland, in 1848.  He served as the organist first at St. John’s Episcopal Church, Baltimore.  Then, for 25 years, he served as the organist at Mount Vernon Place Methodist Episcopal (now United Methodist) Church, “the Cathedral of Methodism,” completed in 1872.  Our saint joined the faculty of the Woman’s College of Baltimore (now Goucher College, Towson) in 1896.  He was an instructor in the theory of music (1891-1892) then the Director of the School of Music (1892-1894).

Schwing, husband of Sophia Wagner (1827-1910) and father of three daughters, all of whom survived him, left a published legacy, too.  His published works included:

  1. Margaret Polka (1849);
  2. Cantate Domino (1859), with co-compiler Lewis H. Steiner, M.D.;
  3. The Musical Philosopher’s Stone, or Amateur’s Test in Judging Music (1862);
  4. The First Instruction on the Piano (1880);
  5. Tunes for Worship (1884);
  6. The Hymnal of the Reformed Church in the United States (1890), as the Musical Editor;
  7. The Woman’s Hymnal:  A Collection of Sacred Lyrics Set to Music and Arranged as Duets for Soprano and Alto (Tenor and Bass Ad Libitium) for the Use of the Woman’s College of Baltimore (1892); and
  8. A Practical Guide in Improvisation and Modulation (1902).

Schwing also arranged hymn tunes.  For example, he arranged DU MEINER SEELEN (#276 in The Hymnal, 1941), by George Joseph/Georg Joseph/George Josephi.

Schwing, aged 81 years, died in Baltimore on January 19, 1907.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 21, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT BRUNO ZEMBOL, POLISH ROMAN CATHOLIC FRIAR AND MARTYR, 1942

THE FEAST OF SAINTS CAMERIUS, CISELLUS, AND LUXORIUS OF SARDINIA, MARTYRS, 303

THE FEAST OF SAINT MAXIMILIAN OF ANTIOCH, MARTYR, CIRCA 353; AND SAINTS BONOSUS AND MAXIAMINUS THE SOLDIER, MATYRS, 362

THE FEAST OF SAINT VICTOIRE RASOAMANARIVO, MALAGASY ROMAN CATHOLIC LAYWOMAN

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Henry Schwing)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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Feast of Benjamin Tucker Tanner (December 20)   3 comments

Above:  Bishop Benjamin Tucker Tanner

Image in the Public Domain

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BENJAMIN TUCKER TANNER (DECEMBER 25, 1835-JANUARY 14, 1923)

African Methodist Episcopal Bishop and Renewer of Society

Bishop Benjamin Tucker Tanner comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via G. Scott Cady and Christopher L. Webber, A Year with American Saints (2006).

Tanner, born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on December 25, 1835, was a son of Hugh Tanner and Isabella Tanner.  Our saint, a student at Avery College, Pittsburgh, paid his way by working as a barber.  Then he spent three years as a student at Western Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh.

Tanner, ordained in the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church, served in A.M.E. and Presbyterian churches.  He organized a Presbyterian Sunday school for former slaves in Washington, D.C..  Then, in 1863, our saint, back in the embrace of the A.M.E. Church, began to serve a church in Georgetown.  He transferred to Baltimore, Maryland, in 1886.  Subsequent posts included:

  1. Pastor of an A.M.E. church, Fredericktown, Maryland;
  2. Organizer of a Freedmen’s Bureau school;
  3. Chief Secretary of the General Conference of the A.M.E. Church (1868f);
  4. Editor, The Christian Recorder (1872f);
  5. Editor, The A.M.E. Review (1884f); and
  6. Bishop (1888f).

Tanner, who, as an ecclesiastical journalist, strove to build up African-American families, wrote books, too.  These were:

  1. Paul Versus Paul Ninth (1865);
  2. An Apology for African Methodism (1867);
  3. The Negro’s Origin:  And Is the Negro Cursed? (1869);
  4. An Outline of Our History and Government for African Methodist Churchmen, Ministerial and Lay, in Catechetical Form (1884); and
  5. The Color of Solomon–What?  “My Beloved is White and Ruddy”:  A Monograph (1895).

Tanner, with Alexander Crummell (1819-1898) and W. E. B. DuBois (1868-1963), founded the American Negro Academy, in memory of Frederick Douglass (1817-1895).  The American Negro Academy refuted racist White academic claims.

Tanner was also a family man.  He married Sarah, an escaped slave who reached freedom via the Underground Railroad.  The couple had nine children, seven of whom lived to adulthood.  The most notable offspring were trailblazers.  Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937) became an internationally acclaimed painter.  Halle Tanner Dillon Johnston, M.D. (1864-1901), became a pioneering physician in the Jim Crow Deep South.

Tanner, aged 87 years, died of chronic myocarditis in Washington, D.C,

Sadly, our saint’s legacy of refuting racism remains relevant.  Talk (from just a few years ago) of the “death of racism” has proven false.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 18, 2018 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ARTEMISIA BOWDEN, AFRICAN-AMERICAN EDUCATOR AND CIVIL RIGHTS ACTIVIST

THE FEAST OF ERDMANN NEUMEISTER, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF FRANCIS JOHN MCCONNELL, U.S. METHODIST BISHOP AND SOCIAL REFORMER

THE FEAST OF JONATHAN FRIEDRICH BAHNMAIER, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF PETTER DASS, NORWEGIAN LUTHERAN MINISTER, POET, AND HYMN WRITER

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Holy and righteous God, you created us in your image.

Grant us grace to contend fearlessly against evil and to make no peace with oppression.

Help us [like your servant Benjamin Tucker Tanner]

to use our freedom to bring justice among people and nations,

to the glory of your name;

through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-14

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

–Adapted from the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978), 37

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Feast of Horatio William Parker (December 18)   Leave a comment

Above:  Horatio William Parker

Image in the Public Domain

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HORATIO WILLIAM PARKER (SEPTEMBER 15, 1863-DECEMBER 18, 1919)

Episcopal Composer, Organist, and Music Educator

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Music is an art which comes nearest to the people, and the one to which they can get nearest themselves.  This art has been the faithful handmaid of Church from the beginning of the Church’s history and has shown itself worthy of care and respect at the hands of the Church authorities; but the Church has recently treated the art something like a stepchild, or, perhaps, like a pretty stranger–nice to have in the house, but to be sternly suppressed at the first sign of independence.

–Horatio William Parker, Before the Episcopal Club of Massachusetts, 1899; quoted in Armin Haeussler, The Story of Our Hymns:  The Handbook of the Hymnal of the Evangelical and Reformed Church (1952), 842

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Parker’s example should be an inspiration to us.  He verily sang the organ’s songs with his whole heart, sparing himself not at all that God’s temple might sound with fitting praise.  Nor must we forget that the very considerable body of organ music well suited to church taste with which he has enriched the repertory of the parish organist.  In his numerous anthems and choral settings of the service Parker speaks, and will long speak, to a larger public.  The worthiness of God’s praise could be more needed by the young church composer of our time.

–Canon Charles Winfred Douglas, 1919; quoted in Haeussler, The Story of Our Hymns (1952), 842-843

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Horatio William Parker, who maintained high standards of church music, comes to this, A Great Cloud of Witnesses:  An Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days, via The Hymnal (1941), of the old Evangelical and Reformed Church.

Parker, born in Auburndale, Massachusetts, on September 15, 1863, came from a devout and artistic family.  Our saint’s mother, Isabella Graham Jennings Parker (1836-1904), was a translator of texts and a daughter of a Baptist minister.  Horatio’s father was Charles Edward Parker (1826-1890), an architect.  Our saint, who studied music from an early age, attended a private school in Newton, Massachusetts.

Parker made his career in music.  He became the organist at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Dedham, Massachusetts, when he was 16 years old.  Later, our saint served as the organist at St. John’s Episcopal Church, Roxbury, Massachusetts.  Parker studied under Josef Rheinberger (1839-1901) at the Hochschule für Musik, Munich, from 1882 to 1885.  Our saint, upon returning to the United States of America, joined the faculty of the Cathedral Schools of St. Mary’s and St. Paul’s, Garden City, Long Island, New York.

Parker returned to Germany long enough to reunite with his love, Anna Poessl (1866-1950), in 1886.  The couple married.  They had five children:

  1. Charlotte Frances Parker Matthai (1887-1957);
  2. William Parker (1891), who died after one day;
  3. Charles Edward Parker (1891), who died after thirty-three weeks;
  4. Isabel Parker Semler (1894-1967); and
  5. Grace Parker Semler (1895-1972).

Parker remained active in music for the rest of his life.  He served as the organist of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Brooklyn; St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Harlem; and Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, New York City; through 1893.  In 1892, Antonín Dvorák (1841-1904) became the Director of the National Conservatory of Music of America, New York City.  Parker served on the faculty.  Our saint served as the organist of Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Boston, Massachusetts, from 1893 to 1901.  He maintained this appointment for years after becoming a professor at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (1894).  In 1901, Parker went to work as the organist at the Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas, New York City, while remaining at Yale.  Our saint, Dean of the School of Music at Yale University (1904-1919), received honorary doctorates from various institutions, in addition to the M.A. he had earned from Yale in 1894.  He also conducted choral groups in Philadelphia and New York City, and organized the New Haven Symphony Orchestra.

One of Parker’s students at Yale was Charles Ives (1874-1954).

Parker was a prolific composer.  His compositions included cantatas, oratorios, operas, orchestral works, orchestral songs, works for the organ, works for the piano, chamber music, and hymn tunes.

A partial list of Parker’s compositions follows:

  1. King Trojan (1886);
  2. A Northern Ballad (1889);
  3. Four Compositions for the Organ (1890);
  4. Hora Novissima:  The Rhythm of Bernard de Morlaix on the Celestial Country (1893), sheet music, recording;
  5. The Holy Child:  A Cantata for Christmastide (1893), with a text by his mother;
  6. The Legend of St. Christopher (1898), with a text by his mother;
  7. Adstant Angelorum Chori (1899);
  8. A Wanderer’s Psalm (Cantus Peregrinus) (1900);
  9. Greek Festival Hymn (1901), with a text by his mother;
  10. Love in May (1901), sheet music, recording;
  11. A Star Song (1902);
  12. Organ Concerto in E Flat Major (1902);
  13. Vathek (1903);
  14. Suite for Piano Trio in A (1904);
  15. The Shepherd’s Vision (1906), with a translation by Alice C. Jennings, perhaps a relative on his mother’s side;
  16. Mona (1911), Prelude, Interlude;
  17. Fairyland (1915);
  18. Fairyland Suite (1915); and
  19. A.D. 1919 (1919).

Parker also edited an edition (with a translation by Alice C. Jennings) of Rheinberger’s (Das Tal des Espingo, 1869 (as The Valley of the Espingo) in 1908.

Our saint wrote The Progressive Music Series for Basal Use in Primary, Intermediate, and Grammar Grades, with the accompanying Teacher’s Manuals:

  1. Book One (1914);
  2. Book Two (1914);
  3. Book Three (1915);
  4. Teacher’s Manual, Volume One (1915);
  5. Teacher’s Manual, Volume Two (1916); and
  6. Teacher’s Manual, Volume Three (1916).

Parker edited hymnals, too.  He edited one of the five musical editions of The Hymnal:  Revised and Enlarged (1892), of The Episcopal Church.  He also edited University Hymns:  With Tunes Arranged for Men’s Voices (1907).

Some written sources criticize Parker for his musical elitism.  These authors cite our saint’s low opinion of congregational hymn singing.  Historical context is crucial in this matter, as it is in all matters.  Consider the following facts, O reader:

  1. Within Anglicanism, the traditional repertoire was metered Psalmody.
  2. Bishop William White (1747-1836) spoke for himself and many others when he dismissed the singing of hymns as too Evangelical, prone to enthusiasm, and indicative of “animal sensibility.”
  3. The earliest Episcopal Prayer Books contained some hymns, despite White’s opinion.
  4. The Hymnal (1826), also known as the Prayer Book Collection because it came bound with The Book of Common Prayer (1789), contained 212 texts.
  5. Unofficial Expansions of the Prayer Book Collection debuted in 1858 and 1860.
  6. The first official Episcopal hymnal not bound with the Prayer Book was The Hymnal (1874).  It contained 532 hymns, plus liturgical texts.
  7. This volume’s two immediate successors were The Hymnal:  Revised and Enlarged (1892) and The Hymnal 1916 (1919).

Louis FitzGerald Benson (1855-1930), the great U.S. Presbyterian hymnodist and hymnal editor, spoke with Parker.  Benson recalled:

He had no instinctive sympathy for congregational singing, which he found inartistic; and he had an idealist’s contempt for the common level and for popularity.  One of his earliest tunes, GARDEN CITY, that attained wide vogue, became an offense to him.  He told me he would recall this tune if he could.

–Quoted in Haeussler, The Story of Our Hymns (1952), 842

Parker, still on the faculty of Yale University, died in Cedarhurst, New York, on December 18, 1919.  He was 61 years old.

Archive.org offers three books about our saint:

  1. Horatio Parker (1921), by George W. Chadwick;
  2. Horatio Parker:  A Memoir for His Grandchildren (1942), by Isabel Parker Semler; and
  3. Horatio Parker, 1863-1919:  His Life, Music, and Ideas (1990), by William K. Kearns.

Parker understood the importance of reverence in church music.  He, enamored of the English cathedral musical tradition, grasped the beauty therein.

As in Parker’s time, much of church music today appeals to the lowest common denominator and indicates little or no artistry.  Bishop White’s comment about “animal sensibility” still applies to much content.  One may derive spiritual benefit from the good singing of quality hymns and still acknowledge that Parker and Bishop White made valid points.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 18, 2021 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF ARTEMISIA BOWDEN, AFRICAN-AMERICAN EDUCATOR AND CIVIL RIGHTS ACTIVIST

THE FEAST OF ERDMANN NEUMEISTER, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF FRANCIS JOHN MCCONNELL, U.S. METHODIST BISHOP AND SOCIAL REFORMER

THE FEAST OF JONATHAN FRIEDRICH BAHNMAIER, GERMAN LUTHERAN MINISTER AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF PETTER DASS, NORWEGIAN LUTHERAN MINISTER, POET, AND HYMN WRITER

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Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Horatio William Parker)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

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