Archive for August 2013

Feast of Donald S. Armentrout (April 22)   10 comments

3b44251v

Above:  The University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee, Circa 1910

Copyright by W. Y. Littig & Company

G34958 U.S. Copyright Office

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-USZ62-98163

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

DONALD SMITH ARMENTROUT (APRIL 22, 1939-MARCH 30, 2013)

U.S. Lutheran Minister and Scholar

Seldom do I have the opportunity to add to the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days someone I have met.  Usually the saints lived some time ago and/or some distance from me.  But, over a decade ago, I had the privilege of attending a Lay Ministries Conference in the Episcopal Diocese of Georgia with Donald S. Armentrout as the speaker.  To this day his influence remains with me.  Whenever I say, for example, that I read the rest of the Bible through the Gospel glasses, I channel Armentrout.

Armentrout, born in 1939, had a long academic career.  He graduated from Roanoke College in 1961.  Then our saint departed for Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, where he graduated with his Master of Divinity degree in 1964.  Three years later he joined the faculty of the University of the South, Sewanee , Tennessee, as an Instructor in ecclesiastical history.  Armentrout, minted a Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University in 1970 and ordained a minister of the Lutheran Church in America (LCA) in 1972, rose through the ranks at the University of the South.  From 1974 to 1984 he directed the joint Doctor of Ministry program with Vanderbilt University.  Then our saint directed the Advanced Degrees Program at Sewanee.  In 1989 Armentrout became the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs.  Two years later he became the Charles Quintard Professor of Dogmatic Theology.  And twice he served as the Interim Dean of the School of Theology.  He retired from the University of the South at the end of 2008.

Armentrout contributed to religious scholarship.  A very partial list of publications follows:

  • The Quest for the Informed Priest:  A History of the School of Theology (1979);
  • A DuBose Reader:  Selections from the Writings of William Porcher DuBose (1984), with Robert B. Slocum;
  • Documents of Witness:  A History of the Episcopal Church, 1782-1985 (1994); and
  • An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church (1999), with Robert B. Slocum.

In 2008 the Very Reverend William S. Stafford, Dean of the School of Theology, wrote of our saint:

In his scholarly work and teaching, Don Armentrout shined light upon the history of the Episcopal Church, as well as the church catholic.  As pastor and preacher, his faith in Jesus Christ crucified has deepened the ministries of many hundreds of graduates of the School of Theology.  He has been more than a pillar of the School of Theology.  He has been a wall to hold us up, and a window to let light in.  No substitute for Don will ever be found, but we are glad that Sewanee gets to keep him and Sue [Ellen Gray Armentrout, his wife] for the coming years in the flexibility and freedom that retirement promises.  We thank Don for his services, and we thank God for Don. (http://news.sewanee.edu/people/2008/12/18/don-armentrout-retires-after-42-years-at-school-of-theology)

I have felt Armentrout’s indirect influence via various priests in Georgia.  That indirect influence in many dioceses might be our saint’s most enduring legacy.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 30, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF CHARLES CHAPMAN GRAFTON, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF FOND DU LAC

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Donald S. Armentrout and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Advertisements

Feast of Calvin Weiss Laufer (April 16)   2 comments

Handbook to the Hymnal (1935) August 28, 2013

Above:  Part of the Title Page of a Germane Volume from my Library

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

CALVIN WEISS LAUFER (APRIL 16, 1874-SEPTEMBER 21, 1938)

U.S. Presbyterian Minister and Hymnodist

Using The Hymnal (1933) has proven to be quite a boon to the Ecumenical Calendar of Saints’ Days and Holy Days.  This source has yielded many wonderful discoveries already.  And I have eight months’ worth of saints yet to go!

Among those discoveries (from my perspective) is the Reverend Calvin Weiss Laufer (1874-1938), a native of Brodheadsville, Pennsylvania.  He attended Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania (B.A., 1897; M.A., 1900) then Union Theological Seminary.  Our saint, ordained in 1900s, served at two churches:

  • Steinway Reformed Church, Long Island City, New York (1901-1905), and
  • First Presbyterian Church, West Hoboken, New Jersey (1905-1915).

Then Laufer worked for arms of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. for the rest of his life.  From 1915 to 1924 he labored for the Presbyterian Board of Publication and Sabbath-School Work.  Then, from 1925 until his death, he worked for the Presbyterian Board of Christian Education, focusing on musical publications.  Our saint, in his official capacity, was partially responsible for the following books:

  • The Church School Hymnal for Youth (1927);
  • Junior Church School Hymnal (1928);
  • Songs for Men (1928);
  • Primary Music and Worship (1930); and
  • Hymn Lore (1932);
  • The Hymnal (1933);
  • Handbook to the Hymnal (1935); and
  • When  the Little Child Wants to Sing (1935).

Laufer, a protege of Lewis Fitzgerald Benson, produced other volumes:

Our saint wrote hymns, some of which I have added to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  He wrote “We Thank Thee, Lord, Thy Paths of Service” (1919) for use in the Flatbush Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, New York, New York, in September 1919.  The pastor, Herbert H. Field, was a dear friend with whom Laufer dined weekly.  Laufer wrote the triumphant “Thee, Holy Father, We Adore” (1931) in the midst of grief.  Our saint wrote of those circumstances in the Handbook to The Hymnal (1935):

This triumphant and joyous hymn of faith was born out of a great domestic sorrow that left the author’s heart and home bereft of an inspiring companionship.  The experience of God’s grace, in its ministry of comfort and a sense of victory in this soul crisis, not only illumined the darkness that fell but revealed the majesty and greatness of God in unforgettable glory.

–Page 19

And Laufer wrote “O Thou Eternal Christ of God” (1933) after an especially memorable Palm Sunday service.

Robert Guy McCutchan, editor of Our Hymnody:  A Manual of The Methodist Hymnal, 2d. Ed. (Nashville, TN:  Abingdon Press, 1937), wrote of our saint:

A writer of hymns, a devotional poet, and a musician of attainment, Doctor Laufer has made a notable contribution to the Church at large.

–Page 164

Yes, Dr. Laufer did.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 30, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF CHARLES CHAPMAN GRAFTON, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF FOND DU LAC

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Calvin Weiss Laufer)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of Jay Thomas Stocking (April 9)   1 comment

4a19636v

Above:  Yale Divinity School, Between 1900 and 1915

Publisher = Detroit Publishing Company

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-D4-39339

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

JAY THOMAS STOCKING (APRIL 7, 1870-JANUARY 27, 1936)

U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

Jay Thomas Stocking, a native of Lisbon, New York, was another minister who did much good during his lifetime yet whose reputation postmortem depends mainly on one hymn.

Stocking, an alumnus of Amherst College (Class of 1895), taught at Lawrenceville, New Jersey, for three years before returning to school as a student.  He graduated from Yale Divinity School in 1901 then attended the University of Berlin.  He, ordained a Congregationalist minister in 1903, served at the following churches:

  • First Church, Bellows Falls, Vermont (1903-1905);
  • Central Church, Newtonville, Newton, Massachusetts (1905-1914);
  • First Church, Washington, DC (1914-1915);
  • Union Church, Upper Montclair, New Jersey (1915-1927);
  • Pilgrim Church, St. Louis, Missouri (1927-1935); and
  • First Church, Newton Centre, Newton, Massachusetts (1935-1936).

A partial list of Stocking’s published works follows:

  • The City That Never Was Reached (1911);
  • The Golden Goblet (1914);
  • Mr. Friend O’Man (1920);
  • Queery Queer (1926); and
  • Stocking Tales (1937);

Stocking, the 1934-1935 Moderator of the National Council of Congregational Christian Churches, was active in the Federal Council of Churches, serving on its Commission on International Justice and Goodwill.

As impressive as all those accomplishments were, one hymn, “O Master Workman of the Race,” has become the postmortem foundation of Stocking’s reputation.  He was on vacation at his summer camp in the Adirondack Mountains in 1912.  The Pilgrim Press had asked our saint to write a hymn for a forthcoming book.  One day, as Stocking watched carpenters repair his summer camp, he had an idea:

The figure of the carpenters, as applied to Jesus, flashed on me as never before, and I sat down and wrote the hymn, almost, if not quite, in the exact form in which it now appears.

–Quoted in Robert Guy McCutchan, Our Hymnody:  A Manual of The Methodist Hymnal, 2d. Ed. (Nashville, TN:  Abingdon Press, 1937), page 151.

As Stocking wrote in his great hymn,

Give us a conscience bold and good,

Give us a purpose true,

That it may be our highest joy

Our Father’s work to do.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 30, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF CHARLES CHAPMAN GRAFTON, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF FOND DU LAC

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Almighty God, we praise you for your servant Jay Thomas Stocking,

through whom you have called the church to its tasks and renewed its life.

Raise up in our own day teachers and prophets inspired by your Spirit,

whose voices will give strength to your church and proclaim the reality of your reign,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns

with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Jeremiah 1:4-10

Psalm 46

1 Corinthians 3:11-23

Mark 10:35-45

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

Feast of Ernest W. Shurtleff (April 4)   1 comment

4a11522v

Above:  Andover Theological Seminary, Andover, Massachusetts

Publisher and Copyright Claimant = Detroit Publishing Company

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-D4-17218

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

ERNEST WARBURTON SHURTLEFF (APRIL 4, 1862-AUGUST 29, 1917)

U.S. Congregationalist Minister and Hymn Writer

Ernest W. Shurtleff, an alumnus of Boston Latin School and Harvard University, attended the Swedenborgian New School Theological Seminary, Cambridge, Massachusetts, before attending then graduating from Andover Theological Seminary.  For his graduating class (that of 1887) our saint wrote the great hymn, “Lead On, O King Eternal.”

Shurtleff, ordained into the Congregationalist ministry, had a varied career.  He served at the First Congregational Church, San Buenaventura (Ventura), California, from 1887 to 1891.  Then he ministered at Plymouth, Massachusetts, for seven years before transferring to the First Congregational Church, Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1898.  Seven years later our saint moved to Frankfurt, Germany, where he founded the American Church.  In 1906 Shurtleff and his wife, Helen, moved to Paris, France, where they remained.  They coordinated student activities at the Academy Vitti in the Latin Quarter.  And,during World War I, they were relief workers.

Shurtleff was an amateur musician and a published poet.  His works included the following:

Shurtleff’s legacy seems to depend primarily on one great hymn yet he did much more for which people ought to remember him.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 30, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF CHARLES CHAPMAN GRAFTON, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF FOND DU LAC

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Dear God of beauty,

you have granted literary ability and spiritual sensitivity to

Ernest W. Shurtleff and others, who have composed hymn texts.

May we, as you guide us,

find worthy hymn texts to be icons,

through which we see you.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Sirach/Ecclesiasticus 44:1-3a, 5-15

Psalm 147

Revelation 5:11-14

Luke 2:8-20

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

APRIL 20, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINTS AMATOR OF AUXERRE AND GERMANUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOPS; SAINT MAMERTINUS OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC ABBOT; AND SAINT MARCIAN OF AUXERRE, ROMAN CATHOLIC MONK

THE FEAST OF JOHANNES BUGENHAGEN, GERMAN LUTHERAN PASTOR

THE FEAST OF SAINT MARCELLINUS OF EMBRUN, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF OLAVUS AND LAURENTIUS PETRI, RENEWERS OF THE CHURCH

Feast of Henry Hallam Tweedy (April 11)   1 comment

4a19636v

Above:  Yale Divinity School, Between 1900 and 1915

Publisher = Detroit Publishing Company

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-D4-39339

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

HENRY HALLAM TWEEDY (AUGUST 5, 1868-APRIL 11, 1953)

U.S. Congregationalist Minister, Liturgist, and Hymn Writer

I launch this, the next wave of new saints, with the Reverend Henry Hallam Tweedy, an impressive person.  He earned his B.A. and M.A. from Yale University and continued his education at Union Theological Seminary and the University of Berlin.  Our saint, ordained in 1898, pastored two Congregational churches–Plymouth Church, Utica, New York (1898-1902), and South Church, Bridgeport, Connecticut (1902-1909).  From 1909 to 1937 he was Professor of Practical Theology at Yale Divinity School.

Tweedy, fascinated by church architecture, was especially interested in matters of liturgy, art, and music–all overlapping pursuits.  His written works reflected the union of the liturgical, artistic, and mundane.  His credits included the following:

Our saint also wrote hymn texts, three of which I have added to my GATHERED PRAYERS weblog.  “O Gracious Father of Mankind” (1925) won first place in a hymn competition which the Homiletic Review sponsored.  Tweedy, dissatisfied with barely singable hymns, set out to write a very singable hymn with substance.  He succeeded.  “Eternal God, Whose Power Upholds” (1929), a missionary hymn, won another contest.  And “O Spirit of the Living God”  is another lovely, meaningful text.

The native of Binghamton, New York, died at Brattleburg, Vermont.

In 1942 Albert W. Palmer, President of The Chicago Theological Seminary, wrote the following in the Introduction to The Art of Conducting Public Worship:

The real miracle of worship is the actual spiritual communion with the divine which may take place, the imparting of transforming peace and power to jangled, beaten, discouraged lives.

–page 2

Henry Hallam Tweedy understood this well and wrote accordingly.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 30, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF CHARLES CHAPMAN GRAFTON, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF FOND DU LAC

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Holy God, whose majesty surpasses all human definitions and capacity to grasp,

thank you for those (especially Henry Hallam Tweedy)

who have nurtured and encouraged the reverent worship of you.

May their work inspire us to worship you in knowledge, truth, and beauty.

In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

1 Chronicles 25:1-8

Psalm 145

Revelation 15:1-4

John 4:19-26

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

NOVEMBER 27, 2012 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT JAMES INTERCISUS, ROMAN CATHOLIC MARTYR

THE FEAST OF HENRY SLOANE COFFIN, U.S. PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGIAN

Feast of Richard Chevenix Trench (March 21)   2 comments

09874v

Above:  St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin, Ireland, Between 1890 and 1900

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-DIG-ppmsc-09874

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RICHARD CHEVENIX TRENCH (SEPTEMBER 9, 1807-MARCH 28, 1886)

Anglican Archbishop of Dublin

I, for the sake of brevity, have listed Richard Chevenix Trench simply as the Archbishop of Dublin.  Yet I wrote seven other descriptins in my notes as I prepared this post:

  1. Bible Translator;
  2. Scholar;
  3. Linguist;
  4. Theologian;
  5. Poet;
  6. Historian; and
  7. Hymn Writer.

Trench, born in Dublin, Ireland, graduated from Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1829.  Among his school friends was Alfred, Lord Tennyson.  Trench, ordained a Deacon in 1832, served as the Curate of Hadleigh (1832-1833) then as the Curate of Suffolk (1833-1835).  Trench’s career as a priest (from 1835) was quite interesting.  He was:

  1. Curate of Curdridge, Hampshire (1835-1841);
  2. Curate of Alverstoke, Hants (1841-1844);
  3. Rector of Itchenstoke (1844-1845);
  4. Examining Chaplain to Samuel Wilberforce, Bishop of Oxford (1845-1846);
  5. Professor of Divinity, King’s College, London (1846-1858);
  6. Dean of Westminster (1856-1863); and
  7. Archbishop of Dublin (1864-1884), succeeding Richard Whately.

During this time Trench’s output was astounding.  A partial list follows:

Trench also served on the committee that produced the Revised Version of the Bible (1881).  And one of his sonnets became a hymn, “Lord What a Change Within Us One Short Hour.”

Richard Chevenix Trench was a scholar, a cleric, and a man of letters–an impressive saint indeed.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 23, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT ROSE OF LIMA, ROMAN CATHOLIC MYSTIC

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

O God, you have endowed us with memory, reason, and skill.

We thank you for the faithful legacy of [Richard Chevenix Trench and all others]

who have dedicated their lives to you and to the intellectual pursuits.

May we, like them, respect your gift of intelligence fully and to your glory.

In the Name of God:  Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.  Amen.

Deuteronomy 6:4-9

Psalm 103

Philippians 4:8-9

Mark 12:28-34

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 6, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT CHRODEGANG OF METZ, ROMAN CATHOLIC BISHOP

THE FEAST OF EDMUND KING, ANGLICAN BISHOP OF LINCOLN

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Revised on December 24, 2016

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Feast of William Edward Hickson (March 21)   1 comment

Octave Clef

Above:  Octave Clef

Image Source = The New Mikemoral

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

WILLIAM EDWARD HICKSON (JANUARY 7, 1803-MARCH 22, 1870)

English Social Reformer and Music Educator

William Edward Hickson, born in London, England, retired from business as a boot manufacturer in 1840 and moved to Sevenoaks, Kent, to become a full-time philanthropist, writer, and composer.  He served on a Royal Commission which investigated the working conditions of hand-loom weavers.  Hickson, from 1840 to 1852 the Editor of The Westminster Review, a publication devoted to social reform, researched foreign educational systems and wrote of their lessons for British national education.

Hickson also composed music and wrote about singing.  His books on the subject included the following:

I was disappointed to read, in Hickson’s own words, an 1867 defense of restricting voting rights so as to exclude “inferior classes”–those who do not own property–so I have a nuanced opinion of the man.  Yet I prefer to focus on the positive–to think about the Hickson who, in 1836, wrote an extra verse to a German patriotic song translated into English as “God Bless Our Native Land:”

Not for this land alone,

But be God’s mercies shown

From shore to shore;

And may the nations see

That men should brothers be,

And form one family

The wide world o’er.

Even if they do not own property.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

AUGUST 23, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT ROSE OF LIMA, ROMAN CATHOLIC MYSTIC

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Holy and righteous God, you created us in your image.

Grant us grace to contend fearlessly against evil and to make no peace with oppression.

Help us, like your servant William Edward Hickson, to work for justice among people and nations,

to the glory of your name, through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord,

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Hosea 2:18-23

Psalm 94:1-15

Romans 12:9-21

Luke 6:20-36

–Adapted from Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 60

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Revised on December 24, 2016

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++